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Great Primer on Genetics

  • Jul 30, 2001
Rating:
+5
Written so the layperson (like me) can understand it, Ridley has provided a tremendous overview of the status of genetic research. With the mapping of the Human Genome, scientific advances in genetics will certainly skyrocket and this is a great place to start if you want some underlying knowledge and understanding about where we're headed in this field.

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More Genome: The Autobiography of a... reviews
review by . June 05, 2010
It is hard to underestimate the importance that genes play in determining who we as a species are. At the very fundamental level it can be argued that it is exactly our genome that determines which species we are to begin with. Ever since the work of Mendel we have known that hereditary information comes in discrete units, and when the structure of DNA had been deciphered we finally understood what those units are. Essentially, all genes are long strands of genetic code written with four "letters" …
review by . April 06, 2009
British science writer, Matt Ridley tells the story of the human genome by concentrating on one gene per chromosome and taking his readers from the beginning of life on Earth to the possible future of humanity. If you are interested in the advances in genetics, "Genome" is a quick, interesting overview, although it was published in 1999 and is already slightly out-of-date.    For instance, the 'final' human genome sequence wasn't published until 2003 (the 'draft' was published …
review by . February 22, 2006
In this book Matt Ridley breaks the human genome down into 23 chapters, one for each chromosome in the human body. In each chapter, he discusses the chromosome and the genes thereon, finding something unique and relevant to the human experience on each. This book was released about a year before the Human Genome Project released its report, and it was a good preview of what was to come.    Ridley has a real gift for taking complex subjects such as transposition and making them …
review by . April 09, 2005
British science writer, Matt Ridley tells the story of the human genome by concentrating on one gene per chromosome and taking his readers from the beginning of life on Earth to the possible future of humanity. If you are interested in the advances in genetics, "Genome" is a quick, interesting overview, although it was published in 1999 and is already slightly out-of-date.    For instance, the 'final' human genome sequence wasn't published until 2003 (the 'draft' was published …
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Wiki

Science writer Matt Ridley has found a way to tell someone else's story without being accused of plagiarism.Genome: The Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters delves deep within your body (and, to be fair, Ridley's too) looking for dirt dug up by the Human Genome Project. Each chapter pries one gene out of its chromosome and focuses on its role in our development and adult life, but also goes further, exploring the implications of genetic research and our quickly changing social attitudes toward this information. Genome shies away from the "tedious biochemical middle managers" that only a nerd could love and instead goes for the A-material: genes associated with cancer, intelligence, sex (of course), and more.

Readers unfamiliar with the jargon of genetic research needn't fear; Ridley provides a quick, clear guide to the few words and concepts he must use to translate hard science into English. His writing is informal, relaxed, and playful, guiding the reader so effortlessly through our 23 chromosomes that by the end we wish we had more. He believes that the Human Genome Project will be as world-changing as the splitting of the atom; if so, he is helping us prepare for exciting times--the hope of a cure for cancer contrasts starkly with the horrors of newly empowered eugenicists. Anyone interested in the future of the body should get a head start with the clever, engrossing Genome. -- Rob Lightner

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Details

ISBN-10: 0060194979
ISBN-13: 978-0060194970
Author: Matt Ridley
Genre: Science
Publisher: HarperCollins
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