Dark Shadows A Lunch Community http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows <![CDATA[ Dark Shadows is wild, goofy, and colorful but it kinda feels like an asthma crisis.]]>
There's no miracle that Tim Burton knows how to create dark cartoonish worlds in which wild colors and vivid characters battle for the enchanted ground of these fantastic universes. Dark Shadows is wild, goofy, and colorful but it kinda feels like an asthma crisis. You know you have this urgency and impatience to watch the next Tim Burton film but even as a fan of him it does nothing in the end but providing you sudden gasps time after time. It's an interesting thing because Burton films usually have a really well developed emotional core. Here he probably wanted to pay an expensive, comical, and glossy homage to the more classic TV show but he didn't manage to give the film it's own identity, it's own soul. Sure it looks fantastic but that's a really slutty compliment you can give Burton considering that he's a master of that and we're already used with his rich vision of the fantastic.

I admire Burton because I respect his guts and his obvious love for film. He's passionate, he's paying a lot of attention to details, and usually he delivers great films on their own. He has his misses like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory or Alice In Wonderland but you can't deny this guy's incredible taste for the mythical and the surreal. He's like the Mad Hatter of cinema. He does nothing short than record dreams on film.



Walking into Dark Shadows with high expectations was a bit disappointing not because the movie ended up being bad but because the movie failed to be a great Tim Burton film. If this film was directed by someone else it would have been probably praised for it's design and considered a decent tribute to a classic TV show. However, since we have to deal with the fact that this is a Tim Burton film, we also have to deal with the fact that we're expecting something a bit more different even if executed by the same recipe. 

This is probably one of Burton's most lazy story executions and is not a great follow-up to Alice in Wonderland. Not only did he missed the soul in this film, he missed a great amount of the expected dark humor, he missed avoiding making the gothic cliches so obvious, he missed the excitement button, and on top of that he also missed a huge portion of the character development. The one character we should root for, Barnabas Collins, played in a goofy, spooky, but already tiresome manner by Johnny Depp, is not at all that accessible and pleasant. All the other characters are far more interesting than him. There's no awesomeness in his own senile and campy behavior. I found myself enjoying a lot more characters like the drunk and sleepy Willie Loomis (Jackie Earle Haley), the stuck-up Roger Collins (Jonny Lee Miller) or the distressed, bored, and impatient doctor Julia Hoffman (Helena Bonham Carter), and even Barnabas' nemesis, Angelique Bouchard, played in a very erotic but manly way by Eva Green. Michelle Pfeiffer as Elizabeth Collins Stoddard and Chloe Moretz as Carolyn Stoddard are the most forgettable characters in the film not only because of their irrelevant and unimportant actions, but also because of the less cartoonish approach. The contrast between these characters is way too broken and dispersed.



The concept behind this story of this cursed man to be a vampire, getting lost in time, and fighting love, adapting to new a new world and new situations is much bigger and interesting than it is presented here. We have a typical, really sketchy and kitschy "from A to B" way of storytelling. And it is wrong because it becomes not only predictable but stale and bland. Visual luxury is not a luxury in a Burton film anymore. We need much more than that. We need Edward Scissorhands, Ed Wood, Sweeney Todd or something completely different but don't treat your audience with the typical. The typical annoys us, frustrates us, and forces us to sigh instead of cheer. 



The soundtrack is really great and matches a lot of the scenes and the aura of the '70s. It's one one of the things that I completely enjoyed in this film. Also the score provided by Danny Elfman, though not a standout, really subtle and well orchestrated. Burton does a pretty good job at this, making the transition from the gothic, old, rusty world to the fresh, modern, and hippy period of the '70s. The cinematography, the lightning, the set-design, the costume-design, the make-up, and everything else is top notch but that doesn't really count for a great experience. It's the heart and the bold attitude of a filmmaker that makes his film entertaining at a high value and today wasn't the best day for Burton. 

Story: 6.0
Acting: 7.5
Technical Execution: 9.1
Replay Value: 6.0
====================
OVERALL: 7.3
he soundtrack is really great and matches a lot of the scenes and the aura of the '70s. It's one one of the things that I completely enjoyed in this film. Also the score provided by Danny Elfman, though not a standout, really subtle and well orchestrated. Burton does a pretty good job at this, making the transition from the gothic, old, rusty world to the fresh, modern, and hippy period of the '70s. The cinematography, the lightning, the set-design, the costume-design, the make-up, and everything else is top notch but that doesn't really count for a great experience. It's the heart and the bold attitude of a filmmaker that makes his film entertaining at a high value and today wasn't the best day for Burton. There's no miracle that Tim Burton knows how to create dark cartoonish worlds in which wild colors and vivid characters battle for the enchanted ground of these fantastic universes. Dark Shadows is wild, goofy, and colorful but it kinda feels like an asthma crisis. You know you have this urgency and impatience to watch the next Tim Burton film but even as a fan of him it does nothing in the end but providing you sudden gasps time after time. It's an interesting thing because Burton films usually have a really well developed emotional core. Here he probably wanted to pay an expensive, comical, and glossy homage to the more classic TV show but he didn't manage to give the film it's own identity, it's own soul. Sure it looks fantastic but that's a really slutty compliment you can give Burton considering that he's a master of that and we're already used with his rich vision of the fantastic.
 
I admire Burton because I respect his guts and his obvious love for film. He's passionate, he's paying a lot of attention to details, and usually he delivers great films on their own. He has his misses like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory or Alice In Wonderland but you can't deny this guy's incredible taste for the mythical and the surreal. He's like the Mad Hatter of cinema. He does nothing short than record dreams on film.
 
Walking into Dark Shadows with high expectations was a bit disappointing not because the movie ended up being bad but because the movie failed to be a great Tim Burton film. If this film was directed by someone else it would have been probably praised for it's design and considered a decent tribute to a classic TV show. However, since we have to deal with the fact that this is a Tim Burton film, we also have to deal with the fact that we're expecting something a bit more different even if executed by the same recipe. 
 
This is probably one of Burton's most lazy story executions and is not a great follow-up to Alice in Wonderland. Not only did he missed the soul in this film, he missed a great amount of the expected dark humor, he missed avoiding making the gothic cliches so obvious, he missed the excitement button, and on top of that he also missed a huge portion of the character development. The one character we should root for, Barnabas Collins, played in a goofy, spooky, but already tiresome manner by Johnny Depp, is not at all that accessible and pleasant. All the other characters are far more interesting than him. There's no awesomeness in his own senile and campy behavior. I found myself enjoying a lot more characters like the drunk and sleepy Willie Loomis (Jackie Earle Haley), the stuck-up Roger Collins (Jonny Lee Miller) or the distressed, bored, and impatient doctor Julia Hoffman (Helena Bonham Carter), and even Barnabas' nemesis, Angelique Bouchard, played in a very erotic but manly way by Eva Green. Michelle Pfeiffer as Elizabeth Collins Stoddard and Chloe Moretz as Carolyn Stoddard are the most forgettable characters in the film not only because of their irrelevant and unimportant actions, but also because of the less cartoonish approach. The contrast between these characters is way too broken and dispersed. 
 
The concept behind this story of this cursed man to be a vampire, getting lost in time, and fighting love, adapting to new a new world and new situations is much bigger and interesting than it is presented here. We have a typical, really sketchy and kitschy "from A to B" way of storytelling. And it is wrong because it becomes not only predictable but stale and bland. Visual luxury is not a luxury in a Burton film anymore. We need much more than that. We need Edward Scissorhands, Ed Wood, Sweeney Todd or something completely different but don't treat your audience with the typical. The typical annoys us, frustrates us, and forces us to sigh instead of cheer.  
 
The soundtrack is really great and matches a lot of the scenes and the aura of the '70s. It's one one of the things that I completely enjoyed in this film. Also the score provided by Danny Elfman, though not a standout, really subtle and well orchestrated. Burton does a pretty good job at this, making the transition from the gothic, old, rusty world to the fresh, modern, and hippy period of the '70s. The cinematography, the lightning, the set-design, the costume-design, the make-up, and everything else is top notch but that doesn't really count for a great experience. It's the heart and the bold attitude of a filmmaker that makes his film entertaining at a high value and today wasn't the best day for Burton. 
]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-228084-Dark_Shadows_is_wild_goofy_and_colorful_but_it.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-228084-Dark_Shadows_is_wild_goofy_and_colorful_but_it.html Wed, 5 Sep 2012 10:29:20 +0000
<![CDATA[ Nice Job of Breathing New Life Into This Franchise]]>
This one left off the time travel and had Barnabas freed from his coffin into a present where Collinwood is in ruins and the family is far more disfunctional than there were in any of the previous incantaions. Victoria Winters (changed her name from Maggie Evans) is drawn to a position to take care of a supposedly mad David Collins. Shortly after Barnabas arrives and lets Elizabeth Collins-Stoddard know exactly who he is. He convinces her by showing her nuances of the mansion that only the original Barnabas Collins would know.

Elizabeth introduces Barnabas to the family as Barnabas III a descendent of the original Barnabas who left to live in England. Nobody really cares but David's psychiatrist Julia Hoffman finds out everything about Barnabas through hypnosis. She then starts giving him tranfusions so he can appear outside during the day.

The Collins chief rival is Angelique Bouchard, who happens to be the witch that put the curse on Barnabas and caused his beloved Josette to jump to her death. Angelique owns the main fishing businesses of Collinsport and does everything she can to keep the Collins' family down.

Barnabas is determined to restore the Collins family to greatness again and to defeat Angelique once and for all. She still wants Barnabas to love her and will destroy him and his family if she can't have him.

Johnny Depp is so likeable and funny in this role and Eva Green makes a wonderful Angelique.. Michelle Pfeiffer is excellent as Elizabelth. I felt they could have had a stronger actress as Victoria. I totally enyoyed this film and hope that Tim Burton has a sequel in him.!]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-224350-Nice_Job_of_Breathing_New_Life_Into_This_Franchise.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-224350-Nice_Job_of_Breathing_New_Life_Into_This_Franchise.html Sat, 26 May 2012 01:34:30 +0000
<![CDATA[ Now for Burton to break from the restraints of the coffin.]]>
"Dark Shadows" does well to give us just about everything we've come to expect from a director-and-star collaboration between the highly imaginative Tim Burton and the illusive character actor Johnny Depp. There's a heart and it's always beating; illuminated by Burton's colorful, visionary sets and camerawork. The man knows what he wants, what we want, and what the studio wants in return. He's out to please. Sometimes, this is a problem, and other times, it is not. I honestly don't know whether it's really an issue here, all I know is that I was never bothered to the point where my enjoyment of the material was lost in the ruins of Burton's own uncontrollable mind. Even if Burton kills the head and the movie doesn't work, the body thrives somehow and entertains, if only momentarily. So in this sense, "Dark Shadows" is neither a step down nor a step up for the acclaimed American filmmaker. Those seeking either new highs or new lows will be disappointed, as the film gives us more of the norm; but surprisingly, I find myself quite alright with that. After all, it's certainly more fun to watch a respected and beloved artist have at least some control on his vision and provide a good time than to watch the entire project crumble right onto he or she who conceived it.

The film is adapted from the black-and-white Gothic soap opera of the same name. Enter Barnabas Collins (Johnny Depp), a rich and arrogant heir to the throne of a family that rightfully founded and owns Collinport, a fictional town in Maine. Barnabas was raised a man ignorant to the horrors of the supernatural; and unknowingly trespasses into such territories when he breaks the heart of a witch named Angelique (Eva Green), a servant for the Collins family who worked in their mansion, Collinwood Manor. She kills Barnabas's parents and curses his family forever, so that a dark fate lies ahead for anyone who is to fall in love with Barnabas in the future. The curse also turns him into a vampire. Fancy that. After the first attempt fails to convince Barnabas into taking her back, Angelique turns the villagers against him after telling them of his true identity. They whisk him away, place him in a coffin, and there he stays for two hundred years. That was in 1760. Barnabas escapes from the coffin in 1972.

Naturally, he returns home after absorbing the necessary amount of blood that he's been craving all these long years, and realizes just how much it has changed. The members of the house now include: Elizabeth Collins (Michelle Pfeiffer), her brother Roger (Jonny Lee Miller), teenage daughter Carolyn (Chloe Grace Moretz), the creepy caretaker (Jackie Earle Haley), disturbed 10 year old son David, and his new governess Victoria Winters (Bella Heathcoate). They've all heard stories of Barnabas, and they've also been reluctant to believe all of them. Big mistake on their part, methinks. Barnabas's arrival disturbs and intrigues the members of the household. He piques the interest of the family doctor (Helena Bonham Carter) in particular, who wants nothing more than to study him. Or is that really all? During his stay, Barnabas attempts to revive the family business that has since died; but Angelique also lives amongst the mortals, and she isn't about to let Barnabas take back the position that he once upheld.

Burton's world comes alive, and we're given yet another solid opportunity to share the fun he had in not only making the film, but coming up with the situations that take place within it. The problem is, some scenes work best as individual vignettes, which of course means that the story doesn't really hold a candle to the visual wonders that appear on-screen. This is typical of Burton, but I wish he would return to more personal and emotionally engaging works rather than just do a bunch of needless Hollywood cake walks. But it's like I said; there's still a lot of excitement. The film is weird and full of energy for the most part, with Burton able to collaborate with a lot of people that he has done work with in the past, as well as some newcomers (Alice Cooper has a small but scenery-chewing role). Also, it helps to have some of the members of the original television series' cast make cameo appearances. I don't know if that will be enough to satisfy fans of the source material, but nonetheless, I think anyone associated with the brilliance of Burton will be more than willing to appreciate what he's done to respect one of his biggest inspirations.

At the end of the day, "Dark Shadows" is kind of a mess, but I'm still pretty darn glad that it is...whatever it is, instead of a celebration of sheer style over substance. I enjoyed myself as much as I possibly could, and it was never boring. That's more than I can say for "Alice in Wonderland", Burton's last feature, to be sure. But I still have my gripes. Burton seems anxious to tackle darker emotional themes, but his eagerness wasn't enough and he clearly follows the path of the studio. So what we've got is some damn good looking visuals in search of a proper, compelling story to tell. The characters are quirky and fun to watch, but what else do we expect from ol' Tim? He does make a decent attempt to staple his flare on the whole vampire narrative - with some unique and amusing scenes involving philosophical life discussions with pot-smoking hippies and comically messy love scenes with sexy witches - and yet it still lacks the depth that it would have required to truly take off. See it, don't see it; I don't suppose it matters. Burton has done better but he has also done worse. "Dark Shadows" is reduced to great sights and sounds, absolutely beautiful women, and another off-kilter performance from Depp; but most movies nowadays still walk away with much, much less for me to talk about.]]>
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<![CDATA[ A Visually Beautiful Gothic-Like And Delightful Film]]>   


Tim Burton and Johnny Depp come together again in this wonderfully delightful film.  Depp proves again that he is capable of successfully portraying any type of character - his talent seems to reach out to the viewer in a huge way - every role he has played he always manages to convince me he really is the character he's playing; it's almost hypnotic, and his role as Barnabas Collins was no exception.

The film starts out as Collins being a child with his parents; they move from Liverpool to America, in Maine, and the family builds a fishing empire and is called Collinsport.  A grown up Collins is the master of Collinwood; he is rich, successful and has been taught that family is the most important treasure in the world.  He falls in love with Josette (Bella Heathcote) but makes the mistake of pissing off the witch Angelique (fabulously played by Eva Green) - she dooms him to be a vampire, then buries him alive.  Almost 200 years later, he is accidentally dug up during a construction renovation - he is so grateful that he kills the construction crew - well geez, wouldn't you be thirsty after 200 years?

The year is now 1972 and Collins then sets out to go back to Collinswood - his beautiful mansion awaits him - alas though, he can not seem to figure out what he sees on his way there - a road (he timidly puts his feet on this strange thing on the ground), a vehicle (what the hell is this moving thing with giant eyes?) and by the time he gets to Collinswood, he is a little stunned, to put it mildly, to see that it is not what he remembered; a once grand mansion has fallen into ruin and he is greeted by the remains of the Collin family - a very dysfunctional family.  Elizabeth (Michelle Pfiffer) is the one member he trusts his true identity with.  Then there is the live-in drunken psychiatrist, Dr. Julia Hoffman (Helena Bonham Carter) who learns soon enough not to ever cross Collins (he never forgives), Elizabeth's rebellious teen daughter Carolyn (Chloe Grace Mortez), Elizabeth's no good brother Roger (Jonny Lee Miller) and Roger's young son David (Gully McGrath) who so badly needs to be understood and believed.  A new governess has been hired named Victoria and she looks exactly like his love Josette from 200 years ago.  To make matters worse, the town has been taken over by Angie, who bears a striking resemblance to the evil witch Angelique.

As the story goes on, Collins deals with his family's dark secrets, making his grand mansion beautiful again, trying to learn about the newfangled things he sees; lava lamps, television, Alice Cooper ("she is the ugliest woman I have ever seen") - (you can imagine how confused you would be if you woke up 200 years later after a deep sleep), wanting to be with and save his true love all the while doing his best to avoid the intimidating and forceful Angelique so he can possess his fishing empire again.  He even meets up with some hippies so he can learn a thing or two. The seriousness of his problems were lightened by subtle humor.   Depp plays his character perfectly - a wonderfully graceful, prim and proper gentleman with a hypnotic and smooth voice - he adds a delightful humor to his role while keeping the viewer fully aware that he is never to be crossed.  He adds a gentle touch to his character and his facial expressions are priceless.  I was amazed at the performance of Angelique; Eva Green was marvelous and convincing in her role as an evil witch - and there seemed to be a nice chemistry between her and Depp.  

It seemed that the other character's roles may have been a little incomplete at times - it was impossible to really get into the full disclosure of the dysfunctional family simply because there were so many characters. I could not quite grasp the feelings between Collins and Victoria (his love) as their scenes together were short and far between, so any chemistry between them was non-existent. The scenery was absolutely gorgeous and there was a genuine gothic feel to the atmosphere, so this made up for the lack of characterization for me.  It truly is a beautifully mastered visual film.


All in all, this was enjoyable for me, despite the emptiness I felt with the characters.  Depp's accent and classy wardrobe along with his debonair mannerisms are convincing, and the gothic feel of the entire movie was wonderful.  Green's performance as Angelique was also convincing and delightful - you could practically feel her wrath.  Pfiffer's role as Elizabeth was also nice though it seemed incomplete at times.  The ending of the movie actually leaves you with more information about the family, so do not be dismayed during the film and wonder what the hell is going on in the minds of this bizarre family!

I give this 3 1/2 out of 5 - if you want to really get the feel of the gothic atmosphere and appreciate the beautiful scenery as well as the fabulous grander of the Collinwood mansion,  I would suggest you see it in the theater.  The 1970's music also was a nice addition to the authentic feel of the movie.




 

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http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-224111-A_Visually_Beautiful_Gothic_Like_And_Delightful.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-224111-A_Visually_Beautiful_Gothic_Like_And_Delightful.html Tue, 15 May 2012 09:40:04 +0000
<![CDATA[ A Devisive Film]]>
Camp A will love this movie because they are fans of the Burton/Depp team. In their eyes, B/D can do no wrong, because the source material is immaterial. They go in expecting only to be entertained by a certain kind of shtick...and in this particular case, they received it in spades, and therefore went home from the theater quite pleased from having their expectations met.

Camp B will be disappointed in this movie, because they are Dark Shadows fans, first. They went in hoping to see a sensitive, definitive handling of their favorite TV show on the big screen, made by pros who claimed to be fans. All they got for their ticket price was evidence that the producers either don't get what Dark Shadows was really about, or don't care, in yet another effort made to pander to the lowest common denominator to boost box office receipts. (Whether or not this strategy will financially work for them is still anybody's guess at the time I write this.)

I, personally, fall into Camp B, so Camp A people might as well stop reading right here, because what I have to say will not interest you in the least.
The film begins almost like the second episode of a nighttime TV drama. "Previously on Dark Shadows...," as it were. A short, quite condensed, teaser-like preamble about Barnabas spurning the wrong woman, and getting punished for it by having to watch his beloved Josette plummet to her death, then he, himself, is buried in vampire form for 200 years. Jump to the 1970's, where we meet a young woman riding a train to her destination. She is rehearsing her introduction out loud to her soon-to-be employers. Inspired by a nearby Olympics poster, she assumes the fake name of "Victoria Winters," and smooth-talks her way into being the new governess at Collinwood (depicted here as the only home the family ever had in the New World). She also bears a strong resemblance to Josette.
The first hour of the film shows quite a lot of promise, as some things unfold expectedly. But other story points, it seems, are zigged merely to surprise the audience's zag expectation. One case in point being the true motivation of Julia Hoffman's attempt at curing Barnabas' affliction. This, I have no problem with, as this sort of thing is done in many of the big-name anime franchises (I happen to be a huge anime fan, too, btw). Dark Shadows, in particular, has a tradition of incorporating changes to its plot, both small and great, in every incarnation it has had. Why, it even gave us parallel world stories during its maiden run.
No, my problem with this movie is in its false premises. Firstly, Dark Shadows, is supposed to be Vicky's story. Because it was deemed more important for it to be a Johnny Depp vehicle, this means Barnabas dominates most of the screentime, reducing the rest of the A-list cast into supporting players. Mrs. Johnson and Willie are particularly wasted here. 
Secondly, Dark Shadows was never ABOUT the horror elements within it. It was about a dreamlike romance, and it relied on the supernatural for its intrigue. NONE of which was the focus in this film. Instead, Burton repeatedly bashes the audience over the head with the concept of making fun of the seventies. Alice Cooper, The Carpenters, lava lamps, disco "happenings," none of which played ANY part in the timelessness of Dark Shadows.
I wonder why he didn't throw in a black guy with an afro, while he was at it?
Another awful mistake was in the character of Barnabas, himself. He is supposed to be a tortured man, who hates what he has become. His obsession is to recreate the image of his lost love. Depp's interpretation shows us a fool who doesn't understand modern-day technology, and feels no pain from the lives he ends, because he conveniently passes all of that blame on to Angelique! This Barnabas' motivation is, in fact, to have more guiltless sex with her, then drive her out of business. It's a sin that he has more on-screen chemistry with his nemesis than his supposed lady love.
The alleged humor of the film mostly fell like lead balloons with me and the audience I saw it with. The low point was Julia giving Barnabas oral sex. And it wasn't enough to disrespect the original characters. It extends to a handful of the original actors, as well, who cameo for all of three seconds. Hardly the "passing of the torch" I had been led to expect. Actually, veteran horror actor Christopher Lee fared much better as a loyal Angelique employee. He actually had some real dialogue with Depp in one scene.
The final hour of the film has all the fireworks. Literally. It is left up to the SFX to save the movie. Another thing that classic Dark Shadows would never do, because, as you know, it wasn't about the SFX, either.

So, Camp A people, enjoy! This movie was made for you. And it will dazzle other moviegoers who are not Dark Shadows aficionados, too, most likely, even if it isn't to the same extent that "The Avengers (2012)" has.
The rest of us? Better luck next time, assuming there is one.
Walt]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-224089-A_Devisive_Film.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-224089-A_Devisive_Film.html Sun, 13 May 2012 22:38:42 +0000
<![CDATA[ Tim Burton Brings Barnabas Collins in the Swinging, Hip 70's....]]> Nightmare Before Christmas”, “Beetlejuice” and “Edward Scissorhands”. I even liked “Cabin Boy” but I had mixed feelings about his re-interpretation of “Batman” and disliked his “Planet of the Apes”. Burton always had a resume that was mixed with me. However, when he is in his element, it cannot be denied that he comes out with something clever and creative most of the time.

                  Helena Bonham Carter as Dr. Julia Hoffman, Chloe Grace Moretz as Carolyn Stoddard, Eva Green as Angelique Bouchard, Gulliver Mcgrath as David Collins, Bella Heathcote as Victoria Winters, Johnny Depp as Barnabas Collins, Ray Shirley as Mrs. Johnson, Jackie Earle Haley as Willie Loomis, Jonny Lee Miller as Roger Collins and Michelle Pfeiffer as Elizabeth Collins Stoddard in "Dark Shadows."

In 1760, Barnabas Collins (Johnny Depp) grew up to be a young aristocrat after his parents had built a fishing empire in a town which is now called “Collinfort”. Barnabas becomes the master of the Collins estate and as such he unintentionally broke the heart of a woman called Angelique (played by stunning Eva Green) who turns out to be a witch. Angered, Angelique causes the family a lot of grief and suffering, and causes Barnabas to lose the woman he loved (Bella Heathcote) before she finally curses him to become a vampire. Fast forward 198 years into the hip 1972, Barnabas is accidentally freed from his prison and finds that his once treasured manor is in near shambles and his descendants led by Elizabeth (beauteous Michelle Pfeiffer) are in near disarray. Barnabas must teach his family what it means to be a Collins and redeem the family name. But Angelique stands firm to defy him, as her obsession with Barnabas drives her to vengeance and perhaps win him back….

                Johnny Depp as Barnabas Collins in "Dark Shadows."

               Johnny Depp as Barnabas Collins in "Dark Shadows."

“Dark Shadows” is a gothic comedy horror film that is based on a script by Seth Grahame Smith which seeks to re-interpret the gothic soap opera for more modern viewers. It is to be expected that purists of the beloved vampire soap opera may be turned off, since why do directors always seem to ‘modernize’ such a number of iconic series into what passes these days for comedy? Myself, my memory of the original series is fuzzy since I’ve seen it many years ago. Burton does try to do whatever he can to include as many characters from the series as he could, which then subjects the film to certain limitations to keep its footing. The direction is pretty credible and Burton does not lose a step in keeping the flow of the film dark, moody and impishly funny. Yes, despite the limitations of the script, Burton and the cast did manage to pull off an entertaining film.

To like 2012’s “Dark Shadows”, one may need to forget about the intricacies of the original series or what had been established before. Admittedly, the film is your standard dark fantasy about family curses, vampires, ghosts and werewolves, with some commentary about how human society changes with the way it sees the world and how immortality can be so seductive. This film is more about a man out of place and out of time. Barnabas may indeed represent the nobility and tragedy of the past and how one can work pass those things to find peace in a new time. Burton does touch on themes that is about ‘looking forward’ and forgetting what had transpired. It does not go too deep into the core of its plot and several things in the script may appear underdeveloped. There are a lot of characters in the film, and Burton tries to touch on as many of them as possible. However, it feels that he had barely scratched its surface, and despite his directorial skills, there were several things that I would’ve wished to have been more fleshed out and some scenes felt more of a montage than an opportunity for drama. Perhaps there will be a sequel that any complaints may be answered?

                       Johnny Depp as Barnabas Collins and Jonny Lee Miller as Roger Collins in "Dark Shadows."

                       Johnny Depp as Barnabas Collins and Eva Green as Angelique Bouchard in "Dark Shadows."

                      Jonny Lee Miller as Roger Collins and Helena Bonham Carter as Dr. Julia Hoffman in "Dark Shadows."

To keep up the film’s pace and momentum Burton employs wit, clever macabre humor and charm to keep his viewers entertained and distracted. Burton instead focuses on the chemistry between Barnabas and Angelique which was the right thing to do. Depp and Evan Green (her scene in that red dress is worth the price of admission) form a certain chemistry that is sexy, erotic and devilishly alluring that it was hard to keep my eyes away from them. It was the “Rip Van Winkle” persona who meets someone familiar and this person is the one thing that ruined his life. The main supporting characters Elizabeth and Dr. Huffman (played by Michelle Pfeiffer and Helena Bonham Carter respectively) does offer dimensions to the development of the Barnabas character. I do have to admit that I wasn’t totally convinced how the spark between Barnabas and Victoria took place, it felt a little too convenient for my tastes. The rest of the cast did feel like they were having fun with their roles; Chloe Grace Moretz (plays Carolyn), Jackie Earley Haley (plays Willie Loomis) and Gulliver McGrath (as David) had their moments to shine despite the limited screen time.

The set designs, make up, visual effects and costumes were all exemplary. The atmosphere and the camera work were impressive in delivering a gothic horror. Burton never lost a step in the way the film was made, as he even remembered to use muted colors and near sepia-like tones to express the mood and contrast between each scene. Shadows are used in a manner that fit its tempo and there is just something so handsome in the way Burton manages each sequence. It is a film very easy to enjoy, despite its flaws and lack of ambition with the script.

                         Bella Heathcote as Victoria Winters in "Dark Shadows."

                         Eva Green as Angelique Bouchard in "Dark Shadows."

2012’s “Dark Shadows” is not a film to write home about, but it is a competent adaptation of the soap opera if a little too different to its purists. Johnny Depp is a magnificent and versatile actor that he commanded the screen as Barnabas Collins. The acting and the flow of the direction was enough to cover up the rough spots in its script. It feels more like a gothic horror fable driven by the performances and clever interactions. No, it may not be the “Dark Shadows” that we hoped for, but Burton did a good job in giving his audience entertainment.

Recommended! [3 ½ Out of 5 Stars]

Poster art for "Dark Shadows." Poster art for "Dark Shadows."]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-224079-Tim_Burton_Brings_Barnabas_Collins_in_the.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-224079-Tim_Burton_Brings_Barnabas_Collins_in_the.html Sat, 12 May 2012 23:52:50 +0000
<![CDATA[ Depp Finally Lands His Dream Role]]> Star Rating:


In a 2007 interview with Entertainment Weekly, Johnny Depp proudly stated that, as he grew up watching Dark Shadows, he wanted to be the vampire Barnabas Collins. “I think lots of kids did,” he said. “He was super-mysterious, with that really weird hairdo and the wolf’s-head cane. Good stuff.” Depp is now luckier than ever to be dear friends with Tim Burton; apart from the fact that he helmed this year’s film adaptation of the gothic soap opera, he gave Depp the chance to live his dream by casting him as Barnabas Collins. I grant you that this is nepotism, but you’d be hard pressed to convince me that any living actor would have been better suited for this role. Depp is of an elite group of actors who can disappear into a role so thoroughly that it’s difficult to tell where the real person ends and the character begins.
 
Dark Shadowsis just plain fun, simultaneously an homage to and a parody of the original soap opera. In much the same way as Burton’s own Beetlejuice, it represents a delicate balancing act between comedy and horror. Unlike Beetlejuice, the comedy has a bit more bite, and the horror is more elegant and brooding, as if it was taken straight from the pages of a Victorian gothic novel. As is the case with all Tim Burton movies, it’s also a triumph of art direction and set decoration. Praise must be given to production designer Rick Heinrichs, whose vision for Collinwood Manor playfully blends whimsy with authentic period architecture. Here is a man who knows how to create the right atmosphere for a story like this. Surely he and Burton have influenced each other, given the fact that the two have now collaborated on thirteen projects.

                                               
                                                 
A prologue sequence serves as an expository introduction to Barnabas Collins. When he was a boy in 1752, he and his parents sailed from Liverpool to Maine to expand their family-run fishing business. The city of Collinsport was established, and over the course of fifteen years, Collinwood Manor was built. As a young man, Barnabas made the mistake of spurning an infatuated servant girl named Angelique Bouchard (Eva Green), who also happened to be a witch. Enraged, she took her revenge on Barnabas by killing his parents and hypnotizing every young woman he fell in love with into jumping off a cliff. The last of them was his true love, Josette du Pres (Bella Heathcote). Barnabas attempted to join her in death, but was instead cursed by Angelique into becoming a vampire (an interesting new twist on the vampire mythos, to say the least). She then turned the townspeople against him. Ultimately, he was buried in a chained coffin the middle of the forest.
 
We then flash forward 196 years to 1972, at which point a young woman named Victoria Winters (also played by Heathcote) travels by train up to Collinsport, where she hopes to become the new governess for the remaining descendants of the Collins family. She arrives at a now dilapidated Collinwood and meets: The matriarchal Elizabeth Collins Stoddard (Michelle Pfeiffer); her moody and rebellious teenage daughter Carolyn (Chloë Grace Moretz); her stodgy and greedy brother Roger (Jonny Lee Miller); her ten-year-old nephew David (Gulliver McGrath), who lost his mother and claims he can still speak to her; David’s live-in psychiatrist Dr. Julia Hoffman (Helena Bonham Carter), who is herself in desperate need of counseling; and the manor’s caretaker Willie Loomis (Jackie Earl Haley), a perpetually drunk goofball.

                                               
                                                 
Barnabas is accidentally liberated from his prison by a construction crew, most of whom are unfortunately sucked dry of their blood. Despite the astronomical generation gap – he’s understandably bewildered by a McDonald’s sign, a TV set, car headlights, asphalt, a lava lamp, a mirror ball, and the fact that women are allowed to be doctors – he returns to Collinwood determined to revamp his once thriving fishing business and in turn restore his family’s honor. The competition, and this should not surprise anyone, is presided over by none other than Angelique, who now calls herself Angie. When she learns that Barnabas has escaped, she simultaneously vows to win him back and to destroy his business and family for good.
 
The film is obviously supposed to in part be funny. Much of the humor stems from Barnabas’ difficultly in adapting to late twentieth-century American culture. This includes having to contend with a group of pot-smoking hippies and an appearance by Alice Cooper, who Barnabas declares is the ugliest woman he has ever seen. But it’s also supposed to be gothic and melodramatic, ghosts, werewolves, black magic, and even a romance between Barnabas and the secretive Victoria all finding their way into the plot. I’ve heard complaints about the meandering storyline and sudden shifts in tone, which I find strange given that the beloved original series frequently made use of overly dramatic plot twists. You cannot expect Dark Shadows to be anything more than what it is.

                                                    ]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-224063-Depp_Finally_Lands_His_Dream_Role.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-224063-Depp_Finally_Lands_His_Dream_Role.html Sat, 12 May 2012 06:33:59 +0000
<![CDATA[ Semi-Dark]]> DARK SHADOWS

Written by Seth Grahame-Smith

Directed by Tim Burton

Starring Johnny Depp, Michelle Pfeiffer and Eva Green

 

Barnabas Collins: Of all the servants I could have spurned, I got the witch.

 

The original soap opera television series, DARK SHADOWS, is before my time, I’m afraid. I’ve never seen the show but from what I understand, it was a bizarre endeavor that, about six months into its roughly 5-year and 1225 episode run, introduced ghosts and other supernatural elements into its world, a first for daytime television for sure. About a year in, the show reached its height of popularity with the introduction of a vampire character by the name of Barnabas Collins. Boys everywhere wanted to be this debonair creature, who is both heroic and flawed. One of those boys was Johnny Depp.

 

Depp’s boyhood dream of being Barnabas has finally come true. These kind of dreams can happen when you have enough money and clout to resurrect a cult classic such as DARK SHADOWS by convincing Hollywood that you can sell it to the masses. And not surprisingly, Depp brought on his long time director buddy, Tim Burton, to helm the project, a seemingly natural choice. After all, Burton is the director of BEETLEJUICE and EDWARD SCISSORHANDS. If there is any director out there that can capture that kooky, yet sometimes scary, but still human deep down, tone needed to pull this film off, it’s this guy, right? Unfortunately, as of late, Burton is more often than not the director Hollywood goes to when you need a vividly colorful and imaginative film that plays so broad it loses all its actual character. DARK SHADOWS falls somewhere in between the two Burton’s.

 

Burton does his best to keep these particular shadows pretty darn dark. Barnabas loses his parents at a young age, at the hand of a scorned lover, Angelique (Eva Green), and then watched his girlfriend plummet to her death off a cliff while under the influence of a magic spell (also administered by Angelique). When he reemerges in 1972, nearly 200 years after he was buried alive - well, more like buried undead - he rejoins his family, now led by a lovely Michelle Pfeiffer, and insists that they work together to reclaim the power and glory the Collins name once commanded. Any steam Burton musters in the setup though is lost once Barnabas is distracted by things like lava lamps and televisions. And then this epic, century-spanning, cursed feud is reduced to a corporate competition between fishing companies. Depp is delightful as Barnabas, which salvages DARK SHADOWS from disaster, but it would be nice to see Burton’s once unbound vision become boundless again, rather than see it consistently watered down for mass consumption. The worst part is that Burton is doing this all to himself.

Thanks for reading.
LUNCH rating is out of 10.

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http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-224030-Semi_Dark.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-224030-Semi_Dark.html Thu, 10 May 2012 13:21:46 +0000
<![CDATA[ Dark Shadows]]>

Remember when Tim Burton had some indie cred, and his emo movies were something new that brought credibility and something different to the movies.  Remember seeing his remake of Planet of the Apes, how he had them wear those stupid hats, just how upset you got seeing it, and wishing things could go back to the way they were.  It hasn't.  You would think a movie based on a sixties vampire soap opera would be right up his alley.  And maybe it was.  And Burton just had so many ideas for his new movie; he couldn't bear cutting any of them out.  That is probably what happened to Tim Burton's most recent passion project. Dark Shadows suffers under the weight of having too many ideas with no idea how to bring them together.

This is the eighth time Johnny Depp and Tim Burton have teamed up and by now there really is nothing left the duo can do to surprise their audience.  Burton goes for a Gothic look while trying to provide a balance of horror and comedy; while Depp rocks a ridiculous wardrobe and a funny accent.  Nothing we haven't seen these two try before.  And just as predictable is Burton shifting his tone as often as he changes his scenes.

No doubt feeling the need to pay homage to the series, Burton tries to include too much with his story and doesn't give enough attention to any of his many subplots.  He does fine with the first act of the movie, and setting up the story.  Even once we get to 1972 the movie has some solid jokes delivered by Depp who always does so well as the fish out of water.  To no surprise Depp was the one of the few bright spots of the movie, and did very well in the roll, but nothing we hadn't seen countless times before.  The movie gets lost in itself once we meet the rest of the family.

While it looks like a large cast really there are only two players in this production.  Johnny Depp as Barnabas Collins and his immortal rival the witch, Angelique Bouchard, played by Eva Green.  Their lust/hate relationship is the main plot line throughout the movie and the only one given any real attention.  Both characters are fully realized and play well off each other.  The only other character that possesses any semblance of depth is Michelle Pfeiffer's matriarchal, Elizabeth Stollard Collins.  All the other characters seem thrown into the mix just to honor the source material of the sixties soap opera.  It wouldn't surprise me if Alice Cooper in a brief cameo had more lines than the rest of the family including a completely underused Chloe Moretz and Jonny Lee Miller who probably should have just been written out of the story entirely to better develop the young son played by Gulliver McGrath.  Even Burton's muse Helena Bonham Carter couldn't gather any real screen time as she would appear briefly as the live-in psychologist and then be completely forgotten about for chunks as a time.

Not only that, but the movie flip flops from comedy to horror at the drop of a hat.  Becoming lighthearted and cheery underscored by some classic hits from the early seventies and then almost immediately shifting gears to murder and death.  While the Burton look to the movie helps reflect whatever mood the audience should feel he shifts too many times, and doesn't do great with either the comedy or the horror.

The movie really loses its momentum by introducing too many characters with too many story lines.  Burton seemed to have a very distinct idea of how he wanted the movie to begin and end but no real road map on how to get there.  By the end of the movie you could almost see Burton throwing his hands in the air and just tossing in ideas that he meant to build towards but never actually mentioned.  And just as I'm sure the production crew was getting frustrated with their ending, the audience did as well, with people in the screening walking out at the end already knowing how the movie was going to end but not caring to see it themselves.  D

]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-224028-Dark_Shadows.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-224028-Dark_Shadows.html Thu, 10 May 2012 12:04:22 +0000
<![CDATA[ 'Dark Shadows' 'Two Jews On Film' Show Their Teeth Over Johnny Depp's Campy Performance (Video)]]>

By Joan Alperin Schwartz

For those of you, like myself, who aren't familiar with the television series 'Dark Shadows' which ran from 1966-1971, here are the film's cliff notes...
The year...1750 (give or take)

A wealthy young man named Barnabus Collins (Johnny Depp) gets it on with his maid, Angelique (Eva Green) who just happens to be a witch...She feels the love...He...not so much.  Witch gets pissed...Turns Barnabus into a vampire, locks him in a coffin, which she then buries deep in the ground.

 Still not satisfied, Angelique kills Barnabus's one true love, as well as his parents, and then, she spends the next two centuries destroying the rest of his family.  This is one witch with major anger issues.

Now, let's fast forward to 1972. For those of you, too lazy to do the math...two hundred years have past....Thanks to a group of construction workers, Barnabas is released from his coffin.  He thanks the workers by eating them...


After quenching his appetite, Barnabus makes his way back home...But his super sized mansion known as Collingswood, is not exactly as he remembers.

 The once grandly estate is now dilapated filled with old furniture in need of a good dusting, a dirty chandelier and...the Collins descendents...who are in no particular order...

Matariarch, Elizabeth (Michelle Pfeiffer)...her rebellious teenage daughter, Carolyn (Chloe Grace Moretz), Roger, (Jonny Lee Miller), Lizzie's bum of a brother,  his precocious 10 year old son, David (Gully McGrath) who has conversations with his dead mother. 

This unhappy little group also shares their home with victoria, the nanny (Bella Heathcote) who happens to look exactly like Barnabas's dead soul mate, a caretaker, Willie (Jackie Earle Haley) and a live in psychiatrist, Dr. Julie Hoffman (the fantastic Helena Bonham Carter).

Okay, so Barnabus arrives home, meets the clan, shares his secret identity with Elizabeth and gets to work restoring the family to its former glory.

 Of course along the way, he must deal with televisions, lava lamps, women doctors, mini skirts, pot smoking hippies, and everything else that was part of the 70's culture...including a Alice Cooper and a happening.

Oh, there's one other small thing...Angelica, the love sick witch, is not only alive and well and running the town of Collinsport, but she still has the hots for Barnabus and will do everything and anything to make him hers.  

'Dark Shadows' directed by Tim Burton and written by Seth Grahame-Smith (Abraham Lincoln Vampire Slayer) is a  fun, campy and visually beautiful film.

 Does it have some problems?...Yes...I felt Johnny Depp's performance was one note and at times, the film felt stuck between two or three different genres.  But having said that, I still enjoyed it and  gave it 3 1/2 bagels out of 5.

John, on the other hand...did not share my opinion.  Check out our video to see his throughts.
'Dark Shadows' opens in theatres Friday, May 11, 2012.   ]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-224023-_Dark_Shadows_Two_Jews_On_Film_Show_Their_Teeth.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-1161-1813898-224023-_Dark_Shadows_Two_Jews_On_Film_Show_Their_Teeth.html Thu, 10 May 2012 03:53:02 +0000
<![CDATA[Jonathan Frid Quick Tip by MichaelN]]> http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/actor/UserReview-Jonathan_Frid-1161-1500849-222791.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/actor/UserReview-Jonathan_Frid-1161-1500849-222791.html Fri, 20 Apr 2012 00:53:35 +0000 <![CDATA[ A Beautiful Revival]]>
The story is basically the same to its analogue in the soap, minus the fillers and plus some interesting alterations to the plot and a few of the characters. For instance, there is no Professor Stokes this time around. However, there is a similar character who is loaded with as much potential -- but, sadly, he is quickly killed off. Willie Loomis is not a punk looking for trouble, but a barely literate slack-jawed relative of the Collins family housekeeper.
Altered to the point of non-recognition is Maggie Evans. She's still a waitress in town, but she smokes and secretly sexually carries on with Roger. She bares no resemblance to Josette DuPres, and she is a talented portrait painter (this was the character's father's role in the original). We also learn that she has certain psychic abilities.

Adding to the realism of the show, is how some of the locals speak with authentic-sounding Maine accents. When Angelique appears, she also speaks with a French accent, as one might logically expect of her. 

Unquestionably, the acting has improved. This is not to cast aspersions upon the classic cast; they were told to ham it up, even against their better judgment. Plus, taking into account the pressure to learn lines quickly every day coupled with the knowledge that there would be no do-overs if they flubbed, it becomes quite understandable. The new production was able to take some time in this department.

In the black and white episodes of the soap, it wasn't unusual to see the characters in outdoor settings. The ghost of Josette is shown dancing outside of the Old House; Roger is seen walking up to the entrance of the Blue Whale. At about the time production switched to color, outdoor scenes, for the most part, became nonexistant. Even where it was unavoidable (such as a scene taking place in a graveyard), it was painfully clear that it was still a dressed up indoor set. Old photographs were used for external establishing shots of Collinwood, or the Old House.

In the new production, they returned to shooting outside scenes outside, but instead of filming the outside of a real mansion for Collinwood, the producers went for a scale model and used that. And that's exactly what it looks like. However, Collinwood's interior looks appropriately lavish, and I cannot tell whether it is real or a set.

A wise decision was made to bring composer Robert Cobert back to score the new series. His music has become iconic and inseparable from the series. His new arrangement for the main title gives me goosebumps.

Dan Curtis said in an interview that DS was not a horror story (tho it obviously had those elements in it). It was a romantic drama with an almost dreamlike quality to it. Which is why, he said, others who tried to copy it never got it right. I would add that it created a new subgenre: supernatural intrigue. This idea that everything that you know about the legendary things that go bump in the night is a given, then how it could all intertwine in a plot so gripping that you just have to tune in again to see what happens next.

The '91 DS could have been a glorified rerun. But instead it used the original plot as a guide, to improve upon it and begin taking some roads that the old show didn't choose to go down. From a viewer perspective, those are the only two legitimate reasons to do a remake. And that is why I praise it.

When MPI had the rights, they released all of the episodes (with restored footage in the first and final ones) on VHS. They never did get the chance to release it on DVD. That right somehow went to MGM, and their DVD release is substandard, to put it mildly. Please see the YouTube video in the link below to get an accurate assessment of why that is so.
Walt
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6f-TKWuTYg ]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/d/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_1991-1161-1681894-222357-A_Beautiful_Revival.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/d/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_1991-1161-1681894-222357-A_Beautiful_Revival.html Sun, 1 Apr 2012 18:51:29 +0000
<![CDATA[ Great Reboot, Unfortunately It Ran Into a War]]>
The story highlighted Barnabas being let of his imprisonment in the family mausoleum by Willie Loomis.  Barnabas pretended to be the descendent of the original Barnabas Collins (though he was one of the same) and took up residence on the Collins estate at the Old House.

Barnabas will later meet and be smitten with Victoria Winters, governess of David Collins who bears a striking resemblence to his long ago love, Josette DuPres.  Through a seance, Victoria is sent back in time to Collinwood in the late 1700's and we learn how Barnabas became a vampire and imprisoned in his coffin.

This series used great special effects as compared to the original series and the new cast seemed to spark a new energy into the series.  Unfortunately NBC refused to move it from its timeslot of Friday night (which had been a ratings deathslot for such shows as the original Star Trek) and the Gulf War broke out which interrupted several of the episodes.  The cost of an episode was extremely high at the time.  To top it off the president of NBC, Brandon Tartakov passed away and the executives that inherited the show didn't know its value.  So, ignoring the protests of the loyal fans (including yours truely) outside its offices, the clueless executives cancelled the show at the cliffhanger conclusion to the first season.

There was an attempt to continue the series through comic books but that too died after about 12 issues.  Overall this series was a glimpse as to what a great series could be and was quite enjoyable when it airred.  I wish it could have gone on for several more seasons as it was rumored that the second season would have introduced Quentin Collins.]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/d/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_1991-1161-1681894-222230-Great_Reboot_Unfortunately_It_Ran_Into_a_War.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/d/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_1991-1161-1681894-222230-Great_Reboot_Unfortunately_It_Ran_Into_a_War.html Mon, 26 Mar 2012 15:35:49 +0000
<![CDATA[Angelique Bouchard Quick Tip by MichaelN]]> http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/d/UserReview-Angelique_Bouchard-1161-1805633-222185.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/d/UserReview-Angelique_Bouchard-1161-1805633-222185.html Sun, 25 Mar 2012 01:43:37 +0000 <![CDATA[ This will keep the reader very interested]]> This is a novel about an Internet romance that starts off very innocently. It quickly enters the realm of weird and bizarre.
 
Alex Rommel is a young, hotshot attorney in present-day Charleston, South Carolina, with a large hole in his heart. Not only did Shannon, his long-time love, break up with him, but she also moved to Brazil, with the intention of never being found by Alex. One day, he runs into an old college buddy with his new girlfriend, who he met on the Internet. They seem totally compatible and happy, so Alex, the last of the Internet dating skeptics, joins a dating site.
 
He gets an e-mail from Hope, a twenty-something French photojournalist who is living in Atlanta, and studying for her doctorate in international relations. She is a bit of a traditionalist, insisting that Alex come to Atlanta for their first date. The fact that she is gorgeous makes the travel very much worth it. She also lets Alex know that she is a virgin, and will stay that way until her wedding night. Hope does and says several things that, individually mean nothing, but when put together, mean that something is not right.
 
After their second date, Alex gets a phone call from Charity, Hope’s mother. First, she demands Alex be tested for HIV, in Atlanta, by a doctor of her choosing. Then, she wants to know when Alex is going to marry Hope. Right after that, she implies that Alex doesn't know how to satisfy a woman. In the meantime, Alex owns a piece of ocean front property in Hawaii, that a shadowy corporation named Xanadu Holdings wants very, very much. Alex learns that Xanadu is having him followed, because they know about him seeing Hope in Atlanta. Things are getting more and more bizarre, so Alex's friends encourage him to get out now, before it is too late. Does he listen to them, or does Alex see things through to the bitter end?
 
This is a really good cautionary tale about Internet dating. That person with whom you have a blind date could be just a jerk. He or she could also have ulterior motives of a very different sort. This one will keep the reader very interested
]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/book/UserReview-The_House_of_Dark_Shadows-1161-1792328-218848-This_will_keep_the_reader_very_interested.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/book/UserReview-The_House_of_Dark_Shadows-1161-1792328-218848-This_will_keep_the_reader_very_interested.html Fri, 6 Jan 2012 00:59:26 +0000
<![CDATA[Dark Shadows (2012 Film) Quick Tip by MichaelN]]> http://www.lunch.com/MovieHype/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-13-1813898-213311.html http://www.lunch.com/MovieHype/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_2012_Film_-13-1813898-213311.html Wed, 14 Sep 2011 20:33:32 +0000 <![CDATA[Johnny Depp Quick Tip by BaronSamedi3]]> http://www.lunch.com/MovieHype/reviews/actor/UserReview-Johnny_Depp-13-1008812-208515.html http://www.lunch.com/MovieHype/reviews/actor/UserReview-Johnny_Depp-13-1008812-208515.html Fri, 10 Jun 2011 00:11:48 +0000 <![CDATA[ Long Before "Fatal Attraction" There Was Barnabas Collins]]>
When Barnabas in his new form tried to reclaim his beloved Josette, she committed suicide by throwing herself off Widow's Peak onto the rocks below the high cliff.  When Barnabas' father learned what he had become, he chained Barnabas in his coffin where he was to remain prisoner for more than 150 years.

Having been released from his chained prison by Willie Loomis, a fortune hunter looking to steal Collins family jewels, Barnabas seeks to reunite with the present day Collins family.  He shows up at the Collins mansion, Collinwood, claiming to be the descendent of the original Barnabas Collins who had supposedly gone to England to start a family.

As part of the central plotline of the 1960's soap opera Dark Shadows, the character of Barnabas Collins soon became the most well-known character of daytime television.  Through the series he was constantly looking for someone to recreate his beloved Josette and would always be disappointed.  He would be aided by a blood specialist, Dr. Julia Hoffman who would help find ways to change his blood that would allow him to function during daytime hours. 

Audiences knew that Julia was madly in love with Barnabas but he never seemed to consider her any more than a dear friend.   When the show ended abruptly in 1971, the Barnabas story was never properly resolved.  Barnabas and Julia made a trip from the past back to present day Collinwood with Barnabas still a creature of the undead.  Many fans speculate that had the storyline continued, Barnabas would have eventually come to love Julia and they would have married. 

There was a movie version of the Dark Shadows series with Frid playing a very evil Barnabas called House of Dark Shadows.  That was the last we saw of Frid playing the role.

Frid had a small role as a mute in a made for tv movie during the 1970's but that was the last time tv audiences would see him.  He went on to doing one-man Shakesphere shows around the country and would sometimes do these performances at Dark Shadows conventions.

The show was reborn in 1991 many fans hoped that the show would have a more complete telling of the Barnabas tale with Ben Cross now donning the Barnabas cloak, black onyz ring and wolf's head cane.  That was not to be as the show was canceled after a half a season. 

Dan Curtis the creator of the series tried making a pilot of a new iteration of the series in 2004 with yet a third actor (Alec Newman) as Barnabas but no network would pick up the show so it never got beyond the pilot.  Shortly thereafter Curtis died and the Dark Shadows franchise was sold to Johnny Depp, who plans to take on the Barnabas role himself for a new Dark Shadows film planned for 2013.

Depp doing Barnabas is very intriguing and maybe he can make a new version of Barnabas that could rival his Captain Jack Sparrow in popularity.  Only time will tell.]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/d/UserReview-Barnabas_Collins-1161-1548592-115520-Long_Before_Fatal_Attraction_There_Was_Barnabas.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/d/UserReview-Barnabas_Collins-1161-1548592-115520-Long_Before_Fatal_Attraction_There_Was_Barnabas.html Thu, 19 Aug 2010 18:42:38 +0000
<![CDATA[ One of the best television programs to come out of the 1960's]]>
One of the best television programs to come out of the 1960's, the brainchild of Dan Curtis was a revolutionary break from what daytime television was and changed the way the soap opera was considered!  It focused around the mysterious, wealthy Collins family.   A family that housed many dark secrets.  An innocent young lady named Victoria Winters arrived to be a governess for a spoiled brat rich kid named David Collins.

His Aunt, Elizabeth is the patriarch of the family and she has her own secrets, forbidding Victoria to enter the Collinwood (the name of the family mansion) basement.  The audience seems to suspect that Elizabeth may have murdered her husband and buried him in the basement and that Victoria may be Elizabeth's illegitimate child.  As the show moved along we have David playing with his father's (Roger) brakes, which almost kills him.  Roger has his own issues and has been blackmailing Burke Devlin.

Curtis was ready to dump the show because at the beginning the ratings were not too good.  He decided to add a ghost to the story (what's and old mansion without a ghost?).  This immediately caused the ratings to go up.  Then Curtis came up with one of the most inovative ideas to daytime tv and that was to introduce a vampire to the plot.  The vampire arrives mysteriously and bears an amazing resemblence to one of the Collins' ancestors as well as the same eerie name of Barnabas Collins. 

This stroke of genious shot up the ratings and with the later introduction of Quentin Collins the show became number one and not only had older people watching but many school kids would rush home from classes everyday so they could follow the show.  The show later became the first tv show to reach the big screen with the movie House of Dark Shadows followed by Night of Dark Shadows. 

In 1991 there was a revival series launched with Ben Cross as Barnabas with a good supporting cast: Jeanne Simmons, Roy Thinnes, and a then unknown Joseph Gordon-Levitt.  This show premiered when the Iraq war started and was constantly pre-empted and its Friday night timeslot was less than ideal.    Needless to say it was cancelled after a half season even though mobs of fans (including yours truly) protested outside of NBC Headquarters in New York and LA.

All told, along with Star Trek, Dark Shadows went on to change what was expected of television and spawned legions of fans and fan conventions many years after the show was cancelled.  Today, Johnny Depp owns the Dark Shadows franchise and it is expected that he will launch a new film with himself as Barnabas Collins soon!
]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/tv_show/UserReview-Dark_Shadows-1161-1224928-19949-One_of_the_best_television_programs_to_come_out_of.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/tv_show/UserReview-Dark_Shadows-1161-1224928-19949-One_of_the_best_television_programs_to_come_out_of.html Wed, 17 Mar 2010 22:18:44 +0000
<![CDATA[ He might just be one of the best actors of this era]]>
I just saw the  "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" remake last week, and was amazed at what a great job Johnny Depp did as Willy Wonka (again, not thinking that the movie was the greatest thing in the world either, but I can still justify using it to evaluate Johnny Depp's acting abilities).  Thinking about his roles over the last 15 years ("Sweeny Todd", "Pirates...", "Ed Wood", "Sleepy Hollow", etc) I have to say I think that he is possibly this era's Tom Hanks or Harrison Ford, where you just forget about the actor in the role and know what a fine job the guy did in the performance.  I have to stop and say to myself, "oh yeah, that's Johnny Depp, the same guy who played Captain Jack in the 'Pirates of the Carribean' movies."

Yeah, he's the same guy who claimed years ago that an armadillo trashed his hotel room, but he's been hiding out and laying low in Paris.  So forget the personal celebrity stuff, and think about his acting.

]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/actor/UserReview-Johnny_Depp-1161-1008812-10225-He_might_just_be_one_of_the_best_actors_of_this.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/actor/UserReview-Johnny_Depp-1161-1008812-10225-He_might_just_be_one_of_the_best_actors_of_this.html Sat, 30 May 2009 19:12:38 +0000
<![CDATA[ Revolutionary and Classic!]]>
His Aunt, Elizabeth is the patriarch of the family and she has her own secrets, forbidding Victoria to enter the Collinwood (the name of the family mansion) basement.  The audience seems to suspect that Elizabeth may have murdered her husband and buried him in the basement and that Victoria may be Elizabeth's illegitimate child.  As the show moved along we have David playing with his father's (Roger) brakes, which almost kills him.  Roger has his own issues and has been blackmailing Burke Devlin.

Curtis was ready to dump the show because at the beginning the ratings were not too good.  He decided to add a ghost to the story (what's and old mansion without a ghost?).  This immediately caused the ratings to go up.  Then Curtis came up with one of the most inovative ideas to daytime tv and that was to introduce a vampire to the plot.  The vampire arrives mysteriously and bears an amazing resemblence to one of the Collins' ancestors as well as the same eerie name of Barnabas Collins. 

This stroke of genious shot up the ratings and with the later introduction of Quentin Collins the show became number one and not only had older people watching but many school kids would rush home from classes everyday so they could follow the show.  The show later became the first tv show to reach the big screen with the movie House of Dark Shadows followed by Night of Dark Shadows. 

In 1991 there was a revival series launched with Ben Cross as Barnabas with a good supporting cast: Jeanne Simmons, Roy Thinnes, and a then unknown Joseph Gordon-Levitt.  This show premiered when the Iraq war started and was constantly pre-empted and its Friday night timeslot was less than ideal.    Needless to say it was cancelled after a half season even though mobs of fans (including yours truly) protested outside of NBC Headquarters in New York and LA.

All told, along with Star Trek, Dark Shadows went on to change what was expected of television and spawned legions of fans and fan conventions many years after the show was cancelled.  Today, Johnny Depp owns the Dark Shadows franchise and it is expected that he will launch a new film with himself as Barnabas Collins soon!]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/tv_show/UserReview-Dark_Shadows-1161-1224928-9900-Revolutionary_and_Classic_.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/tv_show/UserReview-Dark_Shadows-1161-1224928-9900-Revolutionary_and_Classic_.html Fri, 22 May 2009 17:24:38 +0000
<![CDATA[ The Start of One of the Most Revolutionary TV Programs Ever!]]>
His Aunt, Elizabeth is the patriarch of the family and she has her own secrets, forbidding Victoria to enter the Collinwood (the name of the family mansion) basement. The audience seems to suspect that Elizabeth may have murdered her husband and buried him in the basement and that Victoria may be Elizabeth's illegitimate child. As the show moved along we have David playing with his father's (Roger) brakes, which almost kills him. Roger has his own issues and has been blackmailing Burke Devlin.

Curtis was ready to dump the show because at the beginning the ratings were not too good. He decided to add a ghost to the story (what's and old mansion without a ghost?). This immediately caused the ratings to go up. Then Curtis came up with one of the most inovative ideas to daytime tv and that was to introduce a vampire to the plot. The vampire arrives mysteriously and bears an amazing resemblence to one of the Collins' ancestors as well as the same eerie name of Barnabas Collins.

This stroke of genious shot up the ratings and with the later introduction of Quentin Collins the show became number one and not only had older people watching but many school kids would rush home from classes everyday so they could follow the show. The show later became the first tv show to reach the big screen with the movie House of Dark Shadows followed by Night of Dark Shadows.

All told, along with Star Trek, Dark Shadows went on to change what was expected of television and spawned legions of fans and fan conventions many years after the show was cancelled. Today, Johnny Depp owns the Dark Shadows franchise and it is expected that he will launch a new film with himself as Barnabas Collins soon!]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_The_Beginning_Collection_1-1161-1547348-103570-The_Start_of_One_of_the_Most_Revolutionary_TV.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_The_Beginning_Collection_1-1161-1547348-103570-The_Start_of_One_of_the_Most_Revolutionary_TV.html Fri, 22 May 2009 12:00:00 +0000
<![CDATA[ A Must for Dark Shadows Fans!]]> Ms. Lara Parker (who played to role of Angelique in the series) does a fairly surprising good job with what I assume is her first novel.

]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/book/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_Angelique_s_Descent-1161-1389844-9614-A_Must_for_Dark_Shadows_Fans_.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/book/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_Angelique_s_Descent-1161-1389844-9614-A_Must_for_Dark_Shadows_Fans_.html Sat, 16 May 2009 16:14:04 +0000
<![CDATA[ A Really Good Horror Film]]> The movie is complete by itself and it is not necessary to have every watched the tv series to understand and enjoy this film.

Some very eerie and tense scenes. Excellent directing and great mood music. The acting also far exceeds what we saw on the tv series!

]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-House_of_Dark_Shadows-1161-1389664-9363-A_Really_Good_Horror_Film.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-House_of_Dark_Shadows-1161-1389664-9363-A_Really_Good_Horror_Film.html Wed, 13 May 2009 18:07:46 +0000
<![CDATA[ A great new series!]]>
Xander's parents instantly fall in love with the old house and set to work trying to make it livable. Xander and his brother, David, begin exploring and make startling discoveries. It seems one of the closets is some sort of gateway to a locker in their new school. If that wasn't strange enough, they also discover a secret passageway that is full of rooms that are portals to other worlds. After a couple of exploring adventures gone bad, the boys soon realize that this house is much more dangerous than they could have ever imagined. Unfortunately, the King's are about to discover just how real that danger is.

Robert Liparulo is known for pulse-pounding thrillers. With winners like Comes a Horseman, Germ, and Deadfall under his belt, he has truly left his mark on the genre. Now Liparulo graces his fans with a new young adult series that has everything we've come to expect from him and more. House of Dark Shadows is a fun story that is full of thrills and chills that never feel watered down for the young adult audience. Xander and David's mini adventures and discoveries are laced with just the right amount of action and intrigue to keep you nervously flying through the pages. The house itself is one of the strongest characters in the book, bringing a delightfully creepy tone to this well crafted tale.

As always, Liparulo's writing carries deeper meaning beyond the action and thrills. At its heart this story is about the bond of family and love, and the power therein. With every new novel Liparulo continues to prove what an incredible storyteller he is and this new series is no exception. The end will leave you begging for more and loving every moment. This is Robert Liparulo at his best!
]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/book/UserReview-House_of_Dark_Shadows-1161-1379875-4924-A_great_new_series_.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/book/UserReview-House_of_Dark_Shadows-1161-1379875-4924-A_great_new_series_.html Thu, 12 Feb 2009 21:39:49 +0000
<![CDATA[ "I think the thing to do is to enjoy the ride while you're on it."]]> Pirates of the Carribean came out, and I will continue to be a loyal follower years from now. Not only is he one of the most attractive actors on the scene today, he is himself in all of his movies. He only plays roles that he feels comfortable in, and it shows in his work. That is the way all actors should take their jobs, if it were a perfect world.

For me, it all started with the 1990 movie Crybaby. Depp played Wade "Crybaby" Walker, and I thought he was cute, and that he fit the role perfectly. While the movie itself wasn't much to talk about, I followed his career because of it. I didn't really care for Edward Scissorhands, but again, the role fit Depp well. Portraying Raul Duke (Hunter S. Thompson) in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, you could tell Johnny had spent a lot of time with the man he was pretending to be. I, as with millions of others, felt that his part as Captain Jack Sparrow in Disney's Pirates of the Carribean was flawless. I loved his character in Charlie & The Chocolate Factory, where he played the wacky & crazy factory owner, Willy Wonka. My latest favorite by him would be his main character role in the Tim Burton's musical Sweeney Todd.]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/actor/UserReview-Johnny_Depp-1161-1008812-3284-_I_think_the_thing_to_do_is_to_enjoy_the_ride.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/actor/UserReview-Johnny_Depp-1161-1008812-3284-_I_think_the_thing_to_do_is_to_enjoy_the_ride.html Fri, 19 Dec 2008 06:02:42 +0000
<![CDATA[ Engrossing Read]]>
When the Kings move from L.A. to a secluded small town, fifteen-year-old Xander is beyond disappointed. He and his friends loved to create amateur films . . . but the tiny town of Pinedale is the last place a movie buff and future filmmaker wants to land.

But he, David, and Toria are captivated by the many rooms in the old Victorian fixer-upper they moved into--as well as the heavy woods surrounding the house.

They soon discover there's something odd about the house. Sounds come from the wrong directions. Prints of giant, bare feet appear in the dust. And when David tries to hide in the linen closet, he winds up in locker 119 at his new school.

Then the really weird stuff kicks in: they find a hidden hallway with portals leading off to far-off places--in long-ago times. Xander is starting to wonder if this kind of travel is a teen's dream come true . . . or his worst nightmare.

This was a great start to what seems like a great series. The book was suspenseful, a bit creepy, and just wonderful.

Everything was so vividly described; it was as if you were watching a movie or in the character's head. It transported you into the book and made it seem as if you were in the story.

Sometimes it was hard to differentiate the characters from each other since they weren't that well-developed, but hopefully that it'll change in future books. I did like that Xander was a horror movie fan because whenever something creepy happened he used examples from movies to describe what was happening.

This book is so engrossing that it makes it hard for you to put it down. Since it's fast-paced as well, it's a fast read. The rooms that transport you to different places, or to different times, were original (at least for me).

The creepy or suspenseful things that happened in the book were well-written and interesting. You get so caught up in what's happening that you don't really complain about how the characters aren't developed enough.

The ending was surprising but if you pay close attention to small details it could be predictable. It ended in a cliffhanger and I just want to rush and buy the sequel (out now), to find out what happens next with the King family. I was mad at the father for reasons I cannot say (it's a spoiler) but I kind of understand his reason for doing what he did.

Overall, this a great new series that I recommend to reluctant readers, guys, and fans of suspenseful novels. Plus, it would make a great Christmas gift to an older/younger brother or a male cousin!
-Carol
www.bookluver-carol.blogspot.com]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/book/UserReview-House_of_Dark_Shadows-1161-1379875-139117-Engrossing_Read.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/book/UserReview-House_of_Dark_Shadows-1161-1379875-139117-Engrossing_Read.html Mon, 8 Dec 2008 12:00:00 +0000
<![CDATA[ Write Faster, Bob]]>
Robert Liparulo respects the YA genre by refusing to dumb down his storytelling mastery. House of Dark Shadows delivers rich characters, intense action and crisp setting along with a strong vocabulary. Adults are going to love these books as much as the teens they're written for.

Centered around a family that has "no secrets," the story starts with foreboding and provides bang after wham after sucker-punch as the reader discovers one secret after another along with the characters. More questions are left than are answered.

Shadows introduces the King family, all named after royalty, as they are moving from city to country...make that backwoods. Not only does Xander, the 15-year-old point-of-view character have to deal with leaving friends and a girlfriend, his dad is now his principal in the smallest school he's ever attended.

Xander's folks then find a house they fall in love with. Lots of room, and full of character, creepy noises, shadows and odd acoustics. What's not to love?

Xander discovers how very strange the house is as the entire family is plunged into the truth of the secrets.

The intensity of the themes may be too much for younger or easily frightened readers.]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/book/UserReview-House_of_Dark_Shadows-1161-1379875-157728-Write_Faster_Bob.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/book/UserReview-House_of_Dark_Shadows-1161-1379875-157728-Write_Faster_Bob.html Fri, 6 Jun 2008 12:00:00 +0000
<![CDATA[ Not just for young adults]]>
I've been looking forward to this series. I had some concerns going in, mainly in relation to the amount of blood shed and high body count in Liparulo's adult novels. However, this really isn't like his other books. While Comes a Horseman had some mystery, it was still predominately a thriller. House of Dark Shadows is more of a suspense/mystery/thriller. There's always more questions than answers, and not a lot is revealed at a time. There's still a descent amount of blood and gore, but not to the extent of his other books. I feel quite comfortable letting my 9 year old read this one and anticipate that he will love it.

The first half is very slow. It has a lot of character development, but very little story progression. Some uneasy things are discovered about their new home, but really nothing of surprise. However, once the action does start, the rest of the book flows very nicely, grabbing the reader's attention and keeping it.

I'm very impressed with the way Liparulo wrote this book. While it's marketed to young adults, it's equally enjoyable to older adults. The story is written at an adult level and once the action starts, it's quite gripping. While the end is a bit of a cliff hanger, it's not unsatisfying. Overall, a very good book and a great addition to the young adult market.]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/book/UserReview-House_of_Dark_Shadows-1161-1379875-139894-Not_just_for_young_adults.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/book/UserReview-House_of_Dark_Shadows-1161-1379875-139894-Not_just_for_young_adults.html Wed, 21 May 2008 12:00:00 +0000
<![CDATA[ A Good Horror Film]]> The movie is complete by itself and it is not necessary to have every watched the tv series to understand and enjoy this film.

Some very eerie and tense scenes. Excellent directing and great mood music. The acting also far exceeds what we saw on the tv series!

]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-House_of_Dark_Shadows_1970_-1161-1547982-104141-A_Good_Horror_Film.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/movie/UserReview-House_of_Dark_Shadows_1970_-1161-1547982-104141-A_Good_Horror_Film.html Wed, 26 Nov 2003 12:00:00 +0000
<![CDATA[ A Must for Dark Shadows Fans]]> Ms. Lara Parker (who played to role of Angelique in the series) does a fairly surprising good job with what I assume is her first novel.

]]>
http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/book/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_Ang_lique_s_Descent-1161-1548116-104262-A_Must_for_Dark_Shadows_Fans.html http://www.lunch.com/DarkShadows/reviews/book/UserReview-Dark_Shadows_Ang_lique_s_Descent-1161-1548116-104262-A_Must_for_Dark_Shadows_Fans.html Mon, 20 May 2002 12:00:00 +0000