Dark Souls and Hollow Hearts
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The emotionally charged end.

  • Jun 23, 2011
Rating:
+3
*** out of ****

It's been a long three nights. In this time, I watched a "Godfather" film per night. I was blown away by "The Godfather" and astounded by "The Godfather: Part II", which as I mentioned in my review, is inferior to the first, but still, in my opinion, a very good piece of film. Perhaps I should say the same for the concluding chapter of this epic trilogy. It is often considered the worst film of the three. Some even think it's a bad movie all-together. But in a world where there are mediocre and even bad film trilogies, I am pretty forgiving.

"The Godfather: Part III" is a film that all devote fans of the first two "Godfather" films will want to see. If you're hooked, then you need to reel it all in and finish the trilogy. I don't know what to say about the grand finale. It doesn't exactly go out with a bang, it's not as good as the first two installments, and it's not amongst the best films that Francis Ford Coppola has directed. It left me with different emotions, and maybe that is the film's fatal flaw.

Michael Corleone (Al Pacino) is regretting the things he did in "Part II". He killed many, and he is grieving over that fact. He even goes as far as to consult religious authorities on the matter. What can I say: the man is a killer, and I sympathize for his need for redemption. Since the second installment in this trilogy, Michael has grown older, and so have his children. And now we get to meet them as their older, wiser, more important selves; particularly Mary (Sofia Coppola, daughter of Francis Ford Coppola). Mary takes a liking to Vincent (Andy Garcia), the son of Sonny, if you remember the bastard (he was portrayed wonderfully by the always delightful James Caan).

Vincent has the kind of loyalty and spirit required to impress a man such as Michael. Our pal Mike agrees to take Vince "under his wing", as a possible successor. However, one thing I should mention is one of the story's conflicts: a man named Altobello, a Don. He feels mistreated and cheated at one moment in the film, and this feeling leads to the desire to murder Michael. Let's just say that this creates a lot of opportunities for the plot, most of which are used wisely.

The film has the kind of ending that begs for an emotional response. For those who loved both "The Godfather" and "The Godfather: Part II", a tear might just be shed. But for me, the ending is a hit-or-a-miss. I felt something, but it wasn't personal emotions that would provoke the waterworks. It was a sad ending, and my love for the Michael character is almost as undying as my love for any movie character portrayed so well, but I don't know...I didn't feel what I wanted to feel.

The film is directed well by Coppola to the point where it's still quite good. I enjoyed the film, and it paces itself differently than the other films. Coming out nearly fifteen years after "Part II", the audience may have been the sole cause for the change in pace. However, Coppola knows what people want to see out of these films; and he really does deliver. The acting is still quite good, except for the extremely decent Sofia Coppola, who isn't bad, but serves as a problem. I wouldn't call her "mis-cast", as others would, but I wouldn't defend her either.

The film looks and feels good, or at least good enough to impress me. At the end of the day, "The Godfather: Part III" contains impressive and mighty fine directorial work, backed up by strong editing, great cinematography, and solid ambitions. I liked the film, it was entertaining and absorbing enough to keep my interest for most of those 170 minutes, but I just wish I could have felt more when it finished. However, I suppose nothing can compare to what the first film did for me. That is great cinema, and "Part III" is merely "good cinema", which is enough for most people, and enough for me. I'm in a good mood as I write this review, because I know that I have just finished a fascinating trilogy. When you've run out of things to praise, you must turn to realization, and "Part III" benefits greatly from my ability to understand, appreciate, and realize film.

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June 25, 2011
yes! a review of the trilogy! featuring them all in Movie Hype!
 
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More The Godfather: Part III reviews
review by . April 15, 2005
posted in Movie Hype
I have seen this film several times, all the way through or in parts. Frankly, I have mixed emotions about it because, when discussing it, I want to be fair and focus on it as a discrete film, judging it on its own terms; however, for me at least, that is impossible because it is the third of three Godfather films and its two predecessors are masterpieces. I cannot exclude vivid memories of scenes and even comments from films I first saw 18 and then 14 years before seeing this one for the first …
review by . July 25, 2003
posted in Movie Hype
I have seen this film several times, all the way through or in parts. Frankly, I have mixed emotions about it because, when discussing it, I want to be fair and focus on it as a discrete film, judging it on its own terms; however, that is so difficult for me because it is the third of three Godfather films and its two predecessors are masterpieces. I cannot exclude vivid memories of scenes and even comments from films I first saw 18 and then 14 years before seeing this one in 1990. OK, that's my …
review by . August 24, 2001
posted in Movie Hype
. . .feeling that it was a significant "comedown" after the first two. I differ in that opinion. I much preferred "Part III" to "Part II", feeling that the theme of attempted redemption and reconciliation was extremely powerful. Michael is again trying to keep his family intact, while coming under increasing fire from other organized crime figures (literally). He is consumed with guilt over the "hit" he had ordered on his brother. He is trying to remain connected with his children, and to make amends …
About the reviewer
Ryan J. Marshall ()
It's very likely that the only kind of reviews I'll ever post here are movie reviews. I'm very passionate about film; and at this point, it pretty much controls my life. Film gives us a purpose; … more
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About this movie

Wiki

Sixteen years after Francis Ford Coppola won his second Oscar forThe Godfather II (his first was for the 1972 Godfather), the director and star Al Pacino attempted to revive the concept one more time. Despite an elaborate plot that involves Michael Corleone seeking redemption through the Vatican while simultaneously preparing his nephew (Andy Garcia) to take over the Corleone family, the film fails to take shape as a truly meaningful experience in the way the preceding movies do. Still, Pacino is very moving as an elder Michael, filled with regret and trying hard to make amends with his wife (Diane Keaton) and grown children (one of whom is played, and not all that well, by the director's daughter, Sofia Coppola).--Tom Keogh
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Details

Genre: Action, Adventure, Drama
Release Date: December 25, 1990
MPAA Rating: R
Screen Writer: Francis Ford Coppola
Runtime: 170 minutes
Studio: Paramount Pictures
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