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Step Up 3D

A movie directed by Jon Chu

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Step down, please.

  • Aug 5, 2010
Rating:
-2
STEP UP 3D
Written by Amy Andelson and Emily Meyer
Directed by Jon Chu
Starring Rick Malambri, Adam G. Sevani, Sharni Vinson and Alyson Stoner
 
“Maybe we’re all plugged in to the same song”
 
I am not a dancer but I know enough about them and I’ve seen enough episodes of “So You Think You Can Dance” at this point to know that they are some of the hardest working and most passionate artists out there.  Like one of the greatest dancers in history once sang jubilantly while he kicked his heels in the air, dancers just gotta dance.  (That would be Gene Kelly in case you weren’t aware.)  The street kids of Jon Chu’s STEP UP 3D start their journey with us by expressing this passion in testimonials to the camera and I thought for a moment that this might be something unique that captures that particular passion perfectly.  It took about two minutes though to see that this was going to be just another dance movie after all.
 
I have also seen enough dance movies to know that they don’t change that much from one to the next.  Before a single move is busted, we meet Moose (Adam G. Sevani), a scrawny engineering geek who is just starting college and has to leave his passion for dance behind him.  It’s time to be a man and get with the real world of course.  He ends up in some NYC park dance-off, as I’m sure those happen daily, when Luke (Rick Malambri), the leader of a group of mismatched dancers called The Pirates, plucks him up as if he is his own personal fairy god-dancer, and makes him the newest member of his troupe.  Moose doesn’t really have a say in the matter.  He does have school but this is the dance capital of the world; this is New York City! (Naturally, I know this because Alicia Keys is singing “Empire State of Mind” as we montage over the city.)  Luke and company now have to win some major dance contest in order to keep the house they call home from being repossessed, forcing them on to the street.  You knew that already though; that’s how they always go.
 
Having seen enough dance movies, I also know that ultimately, it is about the dancing.  With routines ranging from breaking and hip-hop to tango and parkour, STEP UP 3 definitely steps up the dance factor.  (I’ve not caught the first two films in the series so I cannot say if it is any better this time out.)  It is also the first film to be originally shot in 3D since all those blue people ran amok last year.  Some of the dancing pops a little harder but today’s dance films need to be so choppy in order for the intended demo to grab on to them, that the dancing itself sometimes gets lost in the editing.  The “Mickey Mouse” 3D here barely seems able to keep up with the dancer’s movements and seems to be ringing in a new wave of extremely commercialized 3D films.  Sloppy college kids walking off the screen and toward me in packs is not cool; it’s a frightening sign of things to come.  But damn those new Nikes look good on all those young people’s feet.
STEP UP 3D
Written by Amy Andelson and Emily Meyer
Directed by Jon Chu
Starring Rick Malambri, Adam G. Sevani, Sharni Vinson and Alyson Stoner


“Maybe we’re all plugged in to the same song”

I am not a dancer but I know enough about them and I’ve seen enough episodes of “So You Think You Can Dance” at this point to know that they are some of the hardest working and most passionate artists out there.  Like one of the greatest dancers in history once sang jubilantly while he kicked his heels in the air, dancers just gotta dance.  (That would be Gene Kelly in case you weren’t aware.)  The street kids of Jon Chu’s STEP UP 3D start their journey with us by expressing this passion in testimonials to the camera and I thought for a moment that this might be something unique that captures that particular passion perfectly.  It took about two minutes though to see that this was going to be just another dance movie after all.

I have also seen enough dance movies to know that they don’t change that much from one to the next.  Before a single move is busted, we meet Moose (Adam G. Sevani), a scrawny engineering geek who is just starting college and has to leave his passion for dance behind him.  It’s time to be a man and get with the real world of course.  He ends up in some NYC park dance-off, as I’m sure those happen daily, when Luke (Rick Malambri), the leader of a group of mismatched dancers called The Pirates, plucks him up as if he is his own personal fairy god-dancer, and makes him the newest member of his troupe.  Moose doesn’t really have a say in the matter.  He does have school but this is the dance capital of the world; this is New York City! (Naturally, I know this because Alicia Keys is singing “Empire State of Mind” as we montage over the city.)  Luke and company now have to win some major dance contest in order to keep the house they call home from being repossessed, forcing them on to the street.  You knew that already though; that’s how they always go.

Having seen enough dance movies, I also know that ultimately, it is about the dancing.  With routines ranging from breaking and hip-hop to tango and parkour, STEP UP 3 definitely steps up the dance factor.  (I’ve not caught the first two films in the series so I cannot say if it is any better this time out.)  It is also the first film to be originally shot in 3D since all those blue people ran amok last year.  Some of the dancing pops a little harder but today’s dance films need to be so choppy in order for the intended demo to grab on to them, that the dancing itself sometimes gets lost in the editing.  The “Mickey Mouse” 3D here barely seems able to keep up with the dancer’s movements and seems to be ringing in a new wave of extremely commercialized 3D films.  Sloppy college kids walking off the screen and toward me in packs is not cool; it’s a frightening sign of things to come.  But damn those new Nikes look good on all those young people’s feet.

Thanks for reading.  Rating is out of 10.

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August 06, 2010
I've never really been into these types of films, but the previews for it made this one look extra cheesetacular. Looks like it really is. Thanks for sharing, Joseph!
 
August 06, 2010
meh. Never saw the previous movies in this franchise and I don't think I ever will. Maybe if it's on cable for free I'll give it a shot. Thanks for your reviews on the newest releases, Joseph!
 
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More Step Up 3D reviews
review by . August 09, 2010
posted in Movie Hype
"Step Up" taught us about the redemptive and freeing power of dance. It wasn't a particularly good or original lesson, nor was it a particularly good or original film, but at least what it had to say was clearly stated. "Step Up 2: The Streets" taught us the exact same thing, despite shifting the location from the studios and auditoriums of the Maryland School of the Arts to the streets of Baltimore, where, miraculously, street dancing was at the last minute accepted as a legitimate art form. Now …
About the reviewer
Joseph Belanger ()
Ranked #8
Hello Lunchers. I am a thirty-something guy making his way in Toronto. I am a banker by day and a film critic the rest of the time. Sensitive, sharp and sarcastic are just a few words that start with … more
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Wiki

Step Up 3D is the third installment in the Step Up film series. The film was directed by Jon Chu, who also worked on the previous film Step Up 2: The Streets. Step Up 3D was released in conventional 2-D, Real D 3D, XpanD 3D and Dolby 3D formats on August 6, 2010. It is also the second movie which features the 7.1 Surround Sound audio format, the first was Toy Story 3.
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Details

Director: Jon Chu
Genre: Music, Musical
Release Date: August 06, 2010
MPAA Rating: Unrated
First to Review

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