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a question by Dec 5, 2010
My rotten dog has suddenly started peeing on the carpet in one area and I can't seem to get her to stop. She is potty trained and knows better, but she also think she owns us and not the other way around. I've tried carpet cleaners, but that does not deter her. Any ideas on what I can do to break this bad habit?
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CampingDog's Answer
answered:    December 05, 2010
I've got two thoughts on this.

First, if this behavior has suddenly started, getting her checked by a vet might be a really good idea. If she's got some kind of infection, it's entirely possible that she doesn't have control.

Then, If she checks out, the next thing would be to determine what caused her to start this. Has something changed in the environment that has upset her? Is there anything particular about her chosen pee spot that is special -- i.e., another dog was there, etc.

If you can identify the trigger, then you can take appropriate action, ya know? Without having at least some idea of what has caused her to start this, it'll be hard to identify the best method of dealing with it.

Cleaning the carpet won't stop the behavior. Dogs have a sense of smell that makes them aware of a single scent molecule for long, long, long time after the spot has been marked.

The other thing to consider is taking her to obedience training (which is a hugely fun thing to do, anyway) or having someone come to your home.  A good trainer can give you tips and suggestions for how to retrain her.  If it is true that she thinks she's the alpha dog, then obedience training is critical so you can recognize how you might accidentally be reinforcing her bad behaviors and learn how to get to do what you want her to do -- and gave her love doing it.

Hope this helps -- good luck!
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January 03, 2011
I have two different answers--behavioral and practical: 1) Behavioral: Removing a health issue from the equation if you've already had your pup checked out, it could be an emotional/behavioral issue as many have mentioned. Dogs are SUCH routinized creatures and get upset if you don't keep to the routine. I have tried both Cesar Millan's techniques and Victoria Stillwell's (the female dog trainer from England mentioned in another post). The primary difference between them (as I see it) is that Victoria is more focused not on catching the dog doing something WRONG but catching him/her doing something RIGHT and then rewarding him/her for it....eventually the dog realized "Oh THAT's what she wants me to do...alrighty then." For a while, my pup was pooping in the house, esp. on raining days (she is such a princess about getting her feet wet!). I attacked the problem in two ways: First, when outside, when she did do a poopie, I really poured on the praise and even gave her a treat when we came back inside after showing her the poopie bag to create the association...that's thankfully no longer necessary. Second, when inside, I put down a couple of peepee pads used for puppy training...I told her if she HAD to do poopies inside it had to be ON the paper. I stepped on the paper so it made a crinkly noise...and then said ON the paper...and then put her on the paper so she knew what it felt like under her feet. God bless her, she really tried...I could tell from where the poop was that she WAS standing on the paper but her butt was hanging off. LOLOL Anyhow, we have VERY few incidents inside the house anymore as a result of both of those approaches. 2) Practical: If the dog is just gonna pee in the house until you can figure out WHY he/she is doing it...then try your best to get as much of the odor up so that he/she is not continually drawn back to that spot. I found the Bissell Pet Stain and Odor spray to be GREAT, though I was using it more on spit-up or on poo, as we don't have much of a pee problem. Good luck! Sheri
 
December 15, 2010
She actually did have a problem but that has been resolved. The only thing I can think of that made her start doing this is she like to sit on the couch next to where she has started peeing and is too lazy to go outside. I saw her one day see me, sneak behind the couch, and go pee. She is a little devil.
 
December 07, 2010
FYI: obedience training CAN be fun. It all depends on the trainer and how well the trainee (meaning the human) interfaces with the dog. A bad trainer will generally only exacerbate any behaviorial problems b/c it generates a level of nervousness in the dog.
 
December 07, 2010
Having your dog checked by the vet is a necessity. You don't mention the dog's age which could be a factor. You have a female, right? We once had a cocker spaniel who developed that problem when she got older as a result of complications from her spay, and she had to be euthanized due to uremic poisoning. Have you heard of Cesar Milan, the dog whisperer? If not you should check out his tapes, they're loaded with info that should help you with your problem one way or another. There's also a show on the Animal Planet called It's Me or the Dog that features a British dog trainer. The two use totally different methods but you've got options. With Milan you establish yourself as the alpha which releases a lot of stress that even an alpha dog may be suffering--it makes them feel more secure. You didn't mention whether or not there was a new member of the family, human or otherwise...although it would be hard to be alpha dog unless there was another one around. Kids or any new person in the house can make a dog feel insecure and insecurity can manifest itself in this sort of thing. If there is a new dog one thing that will help is to make sure that she gets everything first--everthing. Petted first, fed first, even called first when're outside.
 
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answered:    December 07, 2010
If it's a "she," then I'd recommend you get her checked. Female dogs don't usually 'spot' urinate -- certainly, not the way males do -- so it's a bit unusual. She could have something going on in her girly areas that gives her the impression that she needs to urinate, like swollen anal glands or something of that variety. My female dog, Tasha, has lotsa troubles back in her yonder area, so she tends to tinkle quite a bit outside in small squirts instead of one long leak. If it is anal glands needing to discharged, you may even want to step outta the room and let the vet and the techs take care of that b/c it's very stinky. (Trust me, I was a tech for about six months when I was in-between jobs.) Let the vet give you some tips and tricks if he doesn't find anything of notice. Of course, the dog owns you. That's a dog's life. Get used to it.
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answered:    December 30, 2010
This is a losing battle. I would suggest getting a cheap rug where hopefully she will pee when she misbehaves. I am on my third dog and you can never fully stop them from occasionly peeing in the house. Remember that dogs are emotional animals and no matter how much you train them, sometimes their emotions go against their training and they will pee to make a point.
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