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Sara Gruen on Ape House

Right before I went on tour for Water for Elephants, my mother sent me an email about a place in Des Moines, Iowa, that was studying language acquisition and cognition in great apes. I had been fascinated by human-ape discourse ever since I first heard about Koko the gorilla (which was longer ago than I care to admit) so I spent close to a day poking around the Great Ape Trust’s Web site. I was doubly fascinated--not only with the work they’re doing, but also by the fact that there was an entire species of great ape I had never heard of. Although I had no idea what I was getting into, I was hooked.

During the course of my research for Ape House, I was fortunate enough to be invited to the Great Ape Trust--not that that didn’t take some doing. I was assigned masses of homework, including a trip to York University in Toronto for a crash course on linguistics. Even after I received the coveted invitation to the Trust, that didn’t necessarily mean I was going to get to meet the apes: that part was up to them. Like John, I tried to stack my odds by getting backpacks and filling them with everything I thought an ape might find fun or tasty--bouncy balls, fleece blankets, M&M’s, xylophones, Mr. Potato Heads, etc.--and then emailed the scientists, asking them to please let the apes know I was bringing “surprises.” At the end of my orientation with the humans, I asked, with some trepidation, whether the apes were going to let me come in. The response was that not only were they letting me come in, they were insisting.

The experience was astonishing--to this day I cannot think about it without getting goose bumps. You cannot have a two-way conversation with a great ape, or even just look one straight in the eye, close up, without coming away changed. I stayed until the end of the day, when I practically had to be dragged out, because I was having so much fun. I was told that the next day Panbanisha said to one of the scientists, “Where’s Sara? Build her nest. When’s she coming back?”

Most of the conversations between the bonobos and humans in Ape House are based on actual conversations with great apes, including Koko, Washoe, Booey, Kanzi, and Panbanisha. Many of the ape-based scenes in this book are also based on fact, although I have taken the fiction writer’s liberty of fudging names, dates, and places.

One of the places I did not disguise or rename is the Lola ya Bonobo sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. They take in orphaned infants, nurse them back to health, and when they’re ready, release them back into the jungle. This, combined with ongoing education of the local people, is one of the wild bonobos’ best hopes for survival.

One day, I’m going to be brave enough to visit Lola ya Bonobo. In the meantime, in response to Panbanisha’s question, I’m coming back soon. Very soon. I hope you have my nest ready!

(Photo © Lynne Harty Photography)

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Details

ISBN-10:  0385523211
ISBN-13:  978-0385523219
Author:  Sara Gruen
Publisher:  Spiegel & Grau
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review by . November 03, 2010
When you have a book as widely read and beloved as Water for Elephants, there is the expectation that the next book is going to bring the same magic to the reader. While I enjoyed Ape House and had little problem staying interested in it, it definitely did not bring the Water for Elephants magic for me (personal opinion!).      Like Water for Elephants, Ape House is a story largely about animals--this time Great Apes (specifically bonobos); and also like the previous book, abuse …
review by . February 02, 2011
Scientist Isabel Duncan is employed at the Great Ape Language Lab, a university research facility where the communication skills between bonobo apes and humans are studied.      Isabel developed her love for the bonobo apes when she was a student. Now she shows reporter, John Thigpen, how the apes respond to the ASL (American Sign Language). John is appreciative and immediately becomes fond of the apes.      The university didn't want the protesters or …
review by . November 03, 2010
When you have a book as widely read and beloved as Water for Elephants, there is the expectation that the next book is going to bring the same magic to the reader. While I enjoyed Ape House and had little problem staying interested in it, it definitely did not bring the Water for Elephants magic for me (personal opinion!).    Like Water for Elephants, Ape House is a story largely about animals--this time Great Apes (specifically bonobos); and also like the previous book, abuse …
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