Do It Yourself!
Do It Yourself!
Welcome to the land of How-To's and D.I.Y!

Wiki

Amazon.com Review
Mark Bittman, award-winning author of such fundamental books as Fish and Leafy Greens and food columnist for the New York Times ("The Minimalist"), has turned in what has to be the weightiest tome of the year. There are more than 900 pages in this sucker--over 1,500 recipes! This isn't just the big top of cookbooks: it's the entire three-ring circus. This isn't just how to cook everything: it's how to cook everything you have ever wanted to have in your mouth. And then some.

Bittman starts with Roasted Buttered Nuts and Real Buttered Popcorn, and moves right along, section by section, from the likes of Black Bean Soup (eight different ways), to Beet and Fennel Salad, to Mussels (Portuguese-style over Pasta), to Cream Scones--and he hasn't even reached seafood, poultry, meat, or vegetables yet, let alone desserts. There are 23 sections in this cookbook (!) that reflect directly on the how-to of cooking, be that equipment, technique, or recipe.

Every inch of the way the reader finds Bittman's calm, helpful, encouraging voice. "Anyone can cook," he says at the beginning, "and most everyone should." More than a few college kids are going to head off to their first apartments with Bittman's book under arm. More than a few marriages will benefit with this book on the shelf. And anyone who loves cooking and the sound of a great food voice is going to enjoy letting this book fall open where it may. No matter what the page, it's bound to be a tasty and rewarding experience. --Schuyler Ingle --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

 


From Publishers Weekly
There's a millennial ring to the title of Bittman's massive opus of more than 1000 basic recipes and variations as the widely known food writer ("The Minimalist" is a weekly column in the New York Times) and author (Fish) contributes to the list of recently published authoritative, encyclopedic cookbooks. He concedes that most accomplished cooks will find little new here, and indeed the recipes can be as simple as how to pop corn. His voice is a comfortable one, however, so the tone is less tutorial than, say, that of the newly revised Joy of Cooking. While much of the ground covered is familiar, Bittman offers inventive fare (Kale Soup with Soy and Lime) and reclaims formerly abandoned territory?his Creamy Vinaigrette calls for heavy cream. Pastas range from Spaghetti and Meatballs to Pad Thai. Similarly, sandwiches include both old favorites and fresh combinations, e.g., Curried Pork Tenderloin Sandwich with Chutney and Arugula. Bittman's friends, he says, praise his Chicken Adobo as the best chicken dish in the world. He doesn't linger too long with beef because Americans are eating less of it; he remarks that a well-done hamburger is not worth eating. Vegetables are comprehensively addressed from Artichokes to Yuca, with attention paid to buying, storing and cooking methods well suited to each. Desserts are mostly homey, like Apple Brown Betty and Peaches with Fresh Blueberry Sauce, but there is also a Death-by-Chocolate Torte. The enormous breadth of recipes, the unusually modest price and Bittman's engaging, straightforward prose will appeal to many cooks looking for reliable help with?or reference to?kitchen fundamentals. Illustrations not seen by PW. 250,000 first printing; $250,000 ad/promo; simultaneous CD-ROM; 15-city author tour.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
 
edit this info

Details

ISBN-10:  0471789186
ISBN-13:  9780471789185
Author:  Mark Bittman
Publisher:  John Wiley & Sons Inc
Date Published:  2006
Format:  Book; English
What's your opinion on How To Cook Everything: Simple Recipes f...?
rate
2 Ratings: +1.5
You have exceeded the maximum length.
More How To Cook Everything: Simple... reviews
review by . October 11, 2010
Lets say you don't know how to cook, or you know how to do a limited number of dishes.  (What I call the amateur with the "specialty."  I-can-cook-I-make-great-spaghetti-sauce syndrome.)  Lets say you've been faking it, but you really are not sure how to make poached eggs or good roast chicken.  What's your first step?       I have a suggestion.  Get yourself at least one good general cookbook that assumes you know absolutely …
Quick Tip by . June 16, 2010
A comprehensive resource. If you have one cookbook this should be it!
review by . December 27, 2009
How To Cook Everything: Simple Recipes for Great Food
This book really does have everything! This cookbook never fails. I can always find a basic how to in this cookbook. And then I can elaborate on the recipe to make it my own. Great ideas!
review by . February 27, 2009
I recently picked up Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything on EBay.  I have a pretty decent cookbook collection, but I don't own a definitive resource on, well, how to cook everything. I normally utilize my former-chef husband to be my "phone a friend" when I'm stuck in the kitchen at 3 p.m. trying out some new dish and not sure if I should really be doing what the recipe says I should be doing!    So, to allow my husband the pleasure of focusing on his day job, I welcomed …
© 2014 Lunch.com, LLC All Rights Reserved
Lunch.com - Relevant reviews by real people.
Do It Yourself! is part of the Lunch.com Network - Get this on your site
()
This is you!
Ranked #
Last login
Member since
reviews
comments
ratings
questions
compliments
lists