|
Movies Books Music Food Tv Shows Technology Politics Video Games Parenting Fashion Green Living more >

Wiki

In her first novel, award-winning Indian screenwriter Arundhati Roy conjures a whoosh of wordplay that rises from the pages like a brilliant jazz improvisation.The God of Small Thingsis nominally the story of young twins Rahel and Estha and the rest of their family, but the book feels like a million stories spinning out indefinitely; it is the product of a genius child-mind that takes everything in and transforms it in an alchemy of poetry.The God of Small Thingsis at once exotic and familiar to the Western reader, written in an English that's completely new and invigorated by the Asian Indian influences of culture and language.--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

***

From Publishers Weekly With sensuous prose, a dreamlike style infused with breathtakingly beautiful images and keen insight into human nature, Roy's debut novel charts fresh territory in the genre of magical, prismatic literature. Set in Kerala, India, during the late 1960s when Communism rattled the age-old caste system, the story begins with the funeral of young Sophie Mol, the cousin of the novel's protagonists, Rahel and her fraternal twin brother, Estha. In a circuitous and suspenseful narrative, Roy reveals the family tensions that led to the twins' behavior on the fateful night that Sophie drowned. Beneath the drama of a family tragedy lies a background of local politics, social taboos and the tide of history?all of which come together in a slip of fate, after which a family is irreparably shattered. Roy captures the children's candid observations but clouded understanding of adults' complex emotional lives. Rahel notices that "at times like these, only the Small Things are ever said. The Big Things lurk unsaid inside." Plangent with a sad wisdom, the children's view is never oversimplified, and the adult characters reveal their frailties?and in one case, a repulsively evil power?in subtle and complex ways. While Roy's powers of description are formidable, she sometimes succumbs to overwriting, forcing every minute detail to symbolize something bigger, and the pace of the story slows. But these lapses are few, and her powers coalesce magnificently in the book's second half. Roy's clarity of vision is remarkable, her voice original, her story beautifully constructed and masterfully told. First serial to Granta; foreign rights sold in France, Spain, Portugal, Germany, Italy, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Estonia, Holland, India, Greece, Canada and the U.K.

Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
edit this info

Details

ISBN-10:  0060977493
ISBN-13:  978-0060977498
Author:  Arundhati Roy
Genre:  Literature & Fiction
Publisher:  Harper Perennial
What's your opinion on The God of Small Things?
rate
8 Ratings: +2.5
You have exceeded the maximum length.
More The God of Small Things reviews
review by . May 10, 2011
Reads like Poetry
Click here to read the book quotes. I highly recommend reading the book quotes for a small insight into the beauty of The God of Small Things.       I debated a long time over whether or not The God of Small Things deserved a +4 or a +5 rating. The difference between the two ratings seems rather arbitrary, but it's really not. Giving a read a +5 rating means it was perfectly written, and that it is a must read. Upon many days of reflection, …
Quick Tip by . July 18, 2010
Without rehashing the plot -- I am a bit shocked this book won The Booker Prize. It's a haunting and sad tale told in an almost too cute, sing songy, back and forth in time way from the point of view of child -- but told in third person. It is a clever novel and does explore cultural elements, but never really digs deeply enough into the pathos she explores.
review by . March 29, 2001
This unique tale of childhood in India is written in the lyrical prose of an artist, whose vivid childhood scenes set the stage for a lifetime of heartbreak. The child's perception is beautifully wrought from the experience of Rahel, two-egg twin of her brother, Estha. Living on the outside edge of family acceptance, the children attempt to divine a cohesive explanation for the circumstances of their young lives and that of their mother, Ammu. Roy writes compelling dialogue, skillfully rendering …
review by . August 19, 2000
Without rehashing the plot -- I am a bit shocked this book won The Booker Prize. It's a haunting and sad tale told in an almost too cute, sing songy, back and forth in time way from the point of view of child -- but told in third person. It is a clever novel and does explore cultural elements, but never really digs deeply enough in the pathos she explores.
review by . February 26, 1999
You may be curious to read this award winner which has sold so well. But it is mostly all hype, and ultimately it is a difficult to read, disjointed novel. For anyone who is interested in India, Rohinton Mistry's "A Fine Balance" is a far superior novel, also an award winner, but delightfully readable.
Photos
The God of Small Things
God of small things
Related Topics
A Fine Balance

A book by Rohinton Mistry

Vernon God Little

A book by D.B.C. Pierre

First to Review
© 2014 Lunch.com, LLC All Rights Reserved
Lunch.com - Relevant reviews by real people.
()
This is you!
Ranked #
Last login
Member since
reviews
comments
ratings
questions
compliments
lists