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The Lacuna: A Novel

10 Ratings: 4.4
A book by Barbara Kingsolver

Starred Review. Kingsolver's ambitious new novel, her first in nine years (after theThe Poisonwood Bible), focuses on Harrison William Shepherd, the product of a divorced American father and a Mexican mother. After getting kicked out of his American … see full wiki

Author: Barbara Kingsolver
Publisher: Harper
8 reviews about The Lacuna: A Novel
review by . July 29, 2011
With each book that I've read by Barbara Kingsolver, whether fiction or nonfiction, it becomes increasingly established that I am a standing-ovation fan. She ranks up in among my top three most admired. This is an author who has the skill to combine excellent storytelling with excellent literary artistry.    The Lacuna is an intricate blend of history and fiction. Kingsolver incorporates historical fact, drops in actual newspaper and magazine clippings from the time period of …
review by . May 25, 2010
Barbara Kingsolver is an impressive writer, both in terms of her writing style and the scope and ambition of her works. All of these remarkable qualities are clearly at display in her latest book "The Lacuna." The book is written in a form of diaries, letters and news articles that deal with the life of Harrison Shepherd, a young many and writer who struggles to find his niche in the world. He is of dual American and Mexican descent, and the book roughly spends an equal time between those two countries. …
review by . February 21, 2010
The Lacuna: One of Kingsolver's Best
“The Lacuna” is the story of Harrison Shepherd. When he is 12, his mother Salomé leaves his father, a bureaucrat in Washington DC, and follows the entrepreneur Enrique to Mexico in search of a more exciting life. As the story opens, they are living on Isla Pixol, and Shepherd has been befriended by the household cook, Leandro. One day, Shepherd notices a cave in a cliff just under the sea’s surface. He watches it over several days as it disappears and reappears with changes …
review by . December 02, 2009
Harrison Shepherd's odyssey through three tumultuous decades of the 20th century begins in a lonely boyhood between two worlds, where imagination is his closest friend. It continues through the Depression and World War II, and culminates in the ugly, surreal hysteria of the Red Scare.    Along the way Shepherd mixes plaster for the great Mexican muralist Diego Rivera, becomes a confidant of his colorful wife, the artist Frida Kahlo, serves as secretary to the exiled Bolshevik, …
review by . November 15, 2009
   I finished this recently released novel by Barbara Kingsolver a week ago. I'm still mourning the loss of it from my life.       Need I say much more? For two decades, Kingsolver has been in my Top Five list of American authors (along with Michael Dorris and E.L.Doctorow, to demonstrate my varied taste in literature). This novel is my favorite of all she's written.  It tracts the life of fictional character Harrison Shepherd who is born a U.S. citizen but …
review by . November 15, 2009
I finished the novel a week ago. I'm still mourning the loss of it from my life.    Need I say much more? For two decades, Kingsolver has been in my Top Five list of American authors (along with Michael Dorris and E.L.Doctorow, to demonstrate my varied taste in literature). This novel is my favorite of all she's written.    Here's what I loved (in no particular order):  The tightly woven inclusion of historical events  The 'transcribed …
review by . November 11, 2009
"Children robbed of love will dwell in magic," Barbara Kingsolver wrote in an earlier novel (Animal Dreams). And that's what happens to Harrison Shepherd, the protagonist of this book. He's shuffled back and forth between the two worlds of his Mexican mother and his American father, never completely fitted to either. His mother snags his father as her passport out of Mexico and into the richer, freer world of the United States in the 20s. She leaves him for a rich Mexican, lured by dreams of marriage …
review by . November 11, 2009
"Children robbed of love will dwell in magic," Barbara Kingsolver wrote in an earlier novel (Animal Dreams). And that's what happens to Harrison Shepherd, the protagonist of this book. He's shuffled back and forth between the two worlds of his Mexican mother and his American father, never completely fitted to either. His mother snags his father as her passport out of Mexico and into the richer, freer world of the United States in the 20s. She leaves him for a rich Mexican, lured by dreams of marriage …
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