Business Matters Money Matters! http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters <![CDATA[ Yahoo! It's Run by its Namesake]]> yahoo.com. Later, I opened two more Yahoo! accounts, one for fun and another for business.

Come the next few months, I'll be closing down the two that remain open. This is going to include knocking out my Yahoo! Sports account, which my fantasy football league runs through. Why? Because I'm sick of the way Yahoo! has been destroying itself from the inside.

For my first few years with Yahoo!, everything was fine. There was nothing particularly special about the account, by to me, email is email, and it has a couple of functions: Send mail. Receive mail. After those, everything else is superfluous. Yahoo! at first did that. It wasn't especially spectacular about it, but it functioned. Then after awhile, Yahoo! began engineering changes which were supposed to make the account more efficient.

The way Yahoo! went about the changes was silly. First, whenever I logged on, they would offer me the chance to switch to the new format. Did it matter? Nope, not since they would be switching formats on a certain date no matter what I wanted. If they were going to make the switch no matter what, why even bother interrupting my email with what's basically a full spam page offering the switch in the first place? Why not just go ahead and do it, since it apparently takes mere seconds anyway?

The change to the current format was supposed to make Yahoo! faster and more efficient. To their credit, it IS faster and more efficient, but only when it decides it wants to work. That's the real gamble nowadays. About half the time, the email page doesn't even load. And often enough when it does, I get nothing but error messages. Provided the whole page loads and I can actually look at emails, I open up my email and then THAT page either comes up blank, refuses to load, or pops up an error message. There appears to be a problem loading my message list. Gee, ya think?

Have I an email or two to delete? Yes, in fact I usually have to delete emails pushing two dozen. Sometimes the Yahoo! system is so buggy that even after deleting them all, they'll all mysteriously reappear back on my page like Penn and Teller were pulling some prank.

When I try to back out of a page after reading an email, I do it by clicking on my inbox icon because simply hitting the back icon has frequently resulted in my getting booted from Yahoo! Mail altogether. If I want to, you know, send a message to someone else, well, it the errors aren't coming more often than not, they certainly feel like they are. I'm trying not to send attachments over Yahoo! anymore because I fear what kinds of shit will happen to them in transition.

To be fair to the spam filter, it does catch most of what it's supposed to catch. It also works a little TOO well sometimes, and I find myself flipping through the spam mail regularly because it also catches several messages that I WANT to receive. Not spam messages I like to read for amusement, but little updates from sites that I frequent and in some cases have subscribed to. Meanwhile, some spam still finds its way through to my regular email list. Also, the email lists don't let you use proper up and down arrows now.

The final straw was that Yahoo! now sees it fit to apparently place spam emails from their advertisers at the top of my email lists sometimes. I can't get rid of them, since they're from the people supporting Yahoo! Although they only put one at the top of my message lists for now, how long before these things completely take over and I have to scroll down before getting any of the messages I wanted to see?

Yahoo! really is an excellent name for this email system. It feels like it's being run by a bunch of luddite yahoos. I'm done there within the next few months, after I figure out how to switch all my accounts.]]>
http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Yahoo_Mail-132-1382296-240290-Yahoo_It_s_Run_by_its_Namesake.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Yahoo_Mail-132-1382296-240290-Yahoo_It_s_Run_by_its_Namesake.html Thu, 5 Sep 2013 15:11:45 +0000
<![CDATA[YouTube Quick Tip by BaronSamedi3]]> http://www.lunch.com/Awesomeness/reviews/website/UserReview-YouTube-163-1333930-239194.html http://www.lunch.com/Awesomeness/reviews/website/UserReview-YouTube-163-1333930-239194.html Mon, 5 Aug 2013 12:10:51 +0000 <![CDATA[ Excellent Description of the World Opportunities That Exist Right Now]]> The World America Made by Robert Kagan is about the constantly

evolving changes in the world order and the projection of power by the

major players, as well as small coalitions of countries which can

act cooperatively to achieve economic or geopolitical ends.

 

Kagan presents a world which has been at relative peace between the

major superpowers since the conclusion of the Cold War and the

substantial victory with regard to the War on Terror.

The author explains how America is strategically located far away

from the political hot spots across the globe. In addition, America's

strengths are seen in its tremendous resources, borderlines on

the Atlantic/Pacific oceans and success with democratic processes.

Despite some complaining from competing corners of the world,

America is well tolerated.

 

Kagan makes another important observation which is that territorial

conquest is outdated due to the digital world and advanced

communications. The author uses the phrase "The New

Enlightenment" to describe the direction things are taking.

The author explains that major wars are started when there are

doubts about which powers project more force. In today's

world, there are no major doubts except for countries on

the fringes of the global economic and geopolitical order.

 

The book explains that the major challenges ahead are to sustain

and build upon the current order in the world. This is no small task

but he believes that America and other coalitions of countries are

up to accomplishing the task.

 

The World America Made by Robert Kagan is an important book

about America's role in the world, as well as the opportunities of

smaller coalitions of countries to prosper as a result of mutual

economic and political cooperation. The presentation is easy to

read and it is directed to a wide audience in government, industry

and the general public.

Credits: First Published on Blogcritics

 

]]>
http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-The_World_America_Made-132-1801321-234239-Excellent_Description_of_the_World_Opportunities.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-The_World_America_Made-132-1801321-234239-Excellent_Description_of_the_World_Opportunities.html Mon, 11 Mar 2013 03:48:51 +0000
<![CDATA[Apple Inc. Quick Tip by RabidChihuahua]]> First of all, I'd like to say that I'm NOT a fanboy for Microsoft and PCs, I just hate Apple.

I don't like Apple for many reasons.  One of them is for the fact that for what you get in the products they sell, you get horribly price-gouged.  I'm not joking, I have an Alienware Aurora gaming desktop with an i7 Quad Core 2.66 gHz processor, dual 1 GB graphics cards, 9 GB DDR3 RAM, a 1 TB hard drive, a 21 inch 1080p monitor, and a keyboard and mouse specially made for gaming for a total of about $2500.  A friend of mine got a Mac Pro that has about 80% of the computing power my Aurora desktop does, yet that Mac Pro cost $3500 (this measurement took place in early 2011).  At least in this respect, you're paying $1000 on a name.

Also, I think from a business point of view, Apple makes a lot of stupid decisions.  This company maintains a totally empty "elite" status symbol with its niche customer base, and they'd sell a hell of a lot more computers if they'd drop the prices to the point of making them competitive with PCs.  They'd make even more money if they'd license their operating systems and exclusive software to people that don't own Apple electronics.

I should also point out that if you're into playing games on your computer, there aren't nearly as many games to choose from on a Mac as there is for computers with Windows on it.

Even if I ever start making over $100K a year, I won't give Apple a penny of my money because they'll still be the same hipsters price-gouging people getting a totally meaningless status symbol in return.

]]>
http://www.lunch.com/whatcanisay/reviews/corporation/UserReview-Apple_Inc_-232-1431205-233400.html http://www.lunch.com/whatcanisay/reviews/corporation/UserReview-Apple_Inc_-232-1431205-233400.html Thu, 7 Feb 2013 23:56:26 +0000
<![CDATA[Steve Jobs Quick Tip by RabidChihuahua]]>
The people that compare Jobs to folks like Nikola Tesla don't know what they're talking about.  Tesla not only had great ideas, but he actually got his hands dirty to actually create machinery and other devices to bring alternating currents to practical use.  Similarly, Bjarne Stroustrup not only had the idea to make computer programming easy and logical, he actually worked from 1980-83, buidling off the computer language C to invent C++ (a computer language that's the backbone of so much computer software and video games today).  Tesla and Stroustrup were real geniuses.  Jobs, on the other hand, was just a guy who had wacky ideas but made his team of computer hardware and software engineers do all the work for him, while Jobs took all the credit.

Jobs, you might have fooled a lot of people into thinking that you were a genius, but you haven't fooled me.]]>
http://www.lunch.com/whatcanisay/reviews/public_figure/UserReview-Steve_Jobs-232-1436382-230032.html http://www.lunch.com/whatcanisay/reviews/public_figure/UserReview-Steve_Jobs-232-1436382-230032.html Wed, 21 Nov 2012 20:22:57 +0000
<![CDATA[Lunch.com Quick Tip by BaronSamedi3]]> http://www.lunch.com/Awesomeness/reviews/website/UserReview-Lunch_com-163-1333926-229769.html http://www.lunch.com/Awesomeness/reviews/website/UserReview-Lunch_com-163-1333926-229769.html Sat, 10 Nov 2012 01:21:16 +0000 <![CDATA[ No Debt, NO Money! Why?]]> (Warning: What you're about to hear will change your world and concept of money. Do not embark on the videos if you choose NOT to know what is at stake!)

The topic reviewed should actually be on MONEY since debt essentially is money in this modern world of ours! In today's term, almost everyone owes some form of debt since it's been claimed that some 95% of our supply of money is in the form of debts. What you will be presented with by the following videos (some 3 hours + in total) will likely shock you about the truth about money and yet it is essential that you know what it is all about and not skipped these videos even if it takes you a week of your time to go through them all and absorb what's been said about money. All of us have the wrong and skewed view about what money really is!!!





I hope you've gone through the videos by the time you get to this paragraph. So, does it shock you to know:
  1. Our concept of money and banking are quite unrealistic to begin with?
  2. Our money are not really our money (for those who keep their $$$ at the bank) and that our world could be falling apart anytime soon even if we don't owe the banks a single cent?
  3. Our governments don't actually issue most of the money out there?
  4. If we all are able to pay up all our debts simultaneously, then there really isn't any money out there?
  5. The bankers are actually "screwing" us all big time? 
  6. The system will not hold out much longer and that when the floodgate is totally opened, we have nowhere to run for cover?
  7. The last financial crisis is merely a crisis of liquidity but the next one will be that of loss of systemic confidence and there is nothing any governments can do to redeem themselves as well as to safe keep our "wealth"?
  8. We are in for turbulent times and it's time to prepare for basic survival even if you don't think we can get out of it unscathed!
IF these don't depress you, then I'm not sure what will!
I came across the videos while looking up on Paul Krugman's (as I'm reading his latest book "End This Depression Now"), Joseph Stiglitz's (The Price of Inequality) and Niall Ferguson's (Civilization) talks. I've been reading up on books attempting to paint a picture of what's wrong with our economic world as I knew 2008 was just a prelude to the next "coming". 



There is really no easy way to say this and may be it's better one doesn't know what's going on in the world (I suspect most people won't want to know) but I urged you to as even if it's depressing there are something we all have to face with in our lifetime. And for those with kids to feed, it is imperative that you take the necessary precautions (else you'd end up like my childhood friend). 

So, to sum it all even if you don't read this review, do make sure you take time to go through at least the first video if not all of them! Stay prepared!]]>
http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Debt-132-1828566-224698-No_Debt_NO_Money_Why_.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Debt-132-1828566-224698-No_Debt_NO_Money_Why_.html Mon, 11 Jun 2012 12:35:44 +0000
<![CDATA[Facebook Quick Tip by Sharrie]]>
I wrote a review of it (I know a bubble when I see one!) on the weekend after its listing looking for a price range of $25-28! It recorded a low of $26.83 yesterday (May 31) before a technical rebound at the close! 

So, what's next?!


]]>
http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/website/UserReview-Facebook-132-1333919-224494.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/website/UserReview-Facebook-132-1333919-224494.html Fri, 1 Jun 2012 05:09:42 +0000
<![CDATA[ I know a bubble when I see one!]]>
Facebook had its IPO listed on Nasdaq last friday (May 18) making Mark Zuckerberg a $20 billion man! He rang in the bell for Nasdaq opening & his own wedding the next day (May 19). That makes Mark Zuckerberg not just the richest 28 year old on the planet but also the luckiest guy in the world!!!



So much about Mark Zuckerberg. He's a highly intelligent guy & I suspect that the ones who make the most out of this IPO is him since he got to choose to set a price that's now deemed to be too high by the market. At $38, Mark Zuckerberg managed to raise some $16 billion for the company and his dream and ambition. Morgan Stanley made some 1% underwriting fee out of this although they have probably lost a lot more by trying to support the share above its issuing price last friday, its 1st day of trading.

Never mind about Morgan Stanley. The heydays of investment banking are over with, we hope!!! Still, JPMorgan Chase has its fair share of limelight last week and probably upcoming weeks too. Not to mention one of Goldman Sachs' top men is being investigated for insider trading!



Back to Facebook. At $38, it's a PE of over 100! That's crazy if you compare it to those of Apple and LinkedIn. Does everyone has to own Facebook shares? As if Facebook hasn't owned enough of your time!!! It doesn't make sense to me. This is a case of hope and greed in the stock market, just like it used to be with tulips! Ok, may be Facebook has potential ... ways to monetize its 800 million users! That's in the "distant" future, is it not? If you think no, then you will be sorry today as it is now trading at $5 less than issue price and $10 off its high (a loss of some 14% from its closing last friday)! Who knows how low it will get? Probably around $25-$28?!

The stock market ... well, if you still believe in it, remember that scarcity rules! And, hopes and greed dominate. Sometimes, fear takes flight too! In this case, it's good to see it's not all in a frenzy!!! 

Greed is good, but only for Mark Zuckerberg!!!
As for Greece, God help them!!!

]]>
http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/website/UserReview-Facebook-132-1333919-224251-I_know_a_bubble_when_I_see_one_.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/website/UserReview-Facebook-132-1333919-224251-I_know_a_bubble_when_I_see_one_.html Mon, 21 May 2012 14:52:29 +0000
<![CDATA[Facebook Quick Tip by Sharrie]]>
PE of over 100?! Forget it!!! Are you sure you're that good a friend with Mark? ;-)



]]>
http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/website/UserReview-Facebook-132-1333919-224249.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/website/UserReview-Facebook-132-1333919-224249.html Mon, 21 May 2012 14:18:34 +0000
<![CDATA[ Swim with the Sharks]]> Before I begin this review, let's state it for record that I don't own any shares in JP Morgan, have no business interest in it, nor do I do any banking transactions with the commercial institution. I do have a cousin who works in it!
 
So, why am I interested in it? Well, because of its recent week trading loss of US$2 billion!
 
$2 billion is not a small sum to anyone, not even Mark Zuckerberg; even if this is one of the biggest financial institutions in the world. Not to mention this loss is chalked up by a single department, probably by less than a handful of people too! Imagine for a sec, how long it would take to earn a profit of $2 billion or even revenue!
 
Facebook was listed last friday on Nasdaq. It was tauted as an incredible IPO which makes Mark Zuckerberg a $20 billion man! Now, everyone in the world know Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook. It's a company with lots of talents but not the necessary earnings to warrant its listing share price of some US$38. That's something to discuss later. It's now trading around $33!!!

 
For now though, Mark Zuckerberg made less than $2 billion a year. Even with some 800+ million friends and after some 9 years of hard work, he has a networth of US$20 billion as of last Friday.
 
Let's give it some perspective, shall we?
Mark Zuckerberg = $20 billion. 
JP Morgan trading loss in a week = $2 billion and adding by the minutes as this review is being penned. Dimon is in the rough! He claimed it's a stupid mistake and an oversight (his, for sure! and regulators, etc...).Those are my words. You get the gist of it. The reporter at Huff Post Business reported it as "risky and legally questionable trading" (Richard (RJ) Eskow in JP Morgan Chase: Break up the big banks now. Here's How). 
 
Now, this Memorial Monday, it's reported in Huffington Post as well as London Evening Standard that the losses will escalate to some $7 billion! JPMorgan's net income in 2011 is around US$18.9 billion. That took some 260,000 employees around the world to make it in a year! Some jokers lost a tenth of that (possibly more) in a week?! Stunning?!!! 

 
If you're not, then you should be. JPMorgan Chase was unscathed when other financial institutions were seeking out bailouts during the 2008 financial crisis that rocked the entire world and most of us are still left with feeling the aftershocks. A friend of mine has ended his life partly because of the reckless activities of these so called bankers. Mind you, they are bankers, not loan sharks. Or, are they???
 
Regulators should seriously look into these organizations. Granted, the shareholders are the ones having the right to question the management. And, what business is it for us individuals? Well, I'd be thinking a lot more of it if I were banking with these banks. Also, beware, retail investors, you're swimming with the sharks!!! As for taxpayers, good luck to you (again!) if these institutions should pose systemic risks to the financial system globally again! As if Greece isn't problematic enough!!! *sigh...* 

It's not just Dimon in the rough! The sea is rough!!!

(A Lunch Featured Review)
]]>
http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-JPMorgan_Chase_Co_-132-1823594-224247-Swim_with_the_Sharks.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-JPMorgan_Chase_Co_-132-1823594-224247-Swim_with_the_Sharks.html Mon, 21 May 2012 14:08:21 +0000
<![CDATA[Tiger Head, Snake Tails Quick Tip by Sharrie]]> http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Tiger_Head_Snake_Tails-132-1823534-224240.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Tiger_Head_Snake_Tails-132-1823534-224240.html Mon, 21 May 2012 09:36:36 +0000 <![CDATA[The World America Made Quick Tip by Sharrie]]> http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-The_World_America_Made-132-1801321-221680.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-The_World_America_Made-132-1801321-221680.html Sat, 3 Mar 2012 18:10:35 +0000 <![CDATA[Currency Wars Quick Tip by Sharrie]]>
Currency Wars is a 2012 book of the year as far as I'm concerned. It is also one that details and explains in layman terms the effects of currencies and exchange rates on everyone's life and investments. This is a book that is imperative for all working in the finance industry. I thoroughly enjoy this book and managed to finish it in a span of a mere 3 days which is quite a feat for a non-fiction as far as I'm concerned!

MUST READ!

For those who buys from Kobo, beware that is is a lot more expensive than it is currently on iBook. However, Kobo is having a 30% off this weekend so that should be about the same after the discount.]]>
http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Currency_Wars-132-1801320-221679.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Currency_Wars-132-1801320-221679.html Sat, 3 Mar 2012 18:04:23 +0000
<![CDATA[Endgame Quick Tip by Sharrie]]> http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Endgame-132-1801319-221678.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Endgame-132-1801319-221678.html Sat, 3 Mar 2012 17:54:16 +0000 <![CDATA[The Big Short Quick Tip by Sharrie]]> http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-The_Big_Short-132-1801318-221677.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-The_Big_Short-132-1801318-221677.html Sat, 3 Mar 2012 17:47:35 +0000 <![CDATA[ Be first!]]>
  • The numbers just don't add up anymore.
  • If you're the first out of the door, that's not panicking.

  • This is a movie about the financial crisis that's still ongoing in the world but not any longer in the markets. Until, well, the next tsunami comes around, that is. The 2 statements above still work in the present time though.

    It's been awhile since #1 operates in the global financial and banking system. I bet most people choose to not believe that, ignore it and hope for the best. Even people in the industry will tell you otherwise (especially since a lot is at stake). Others? Well, one can't simply wrap his/her mind around it without going crazy and berserk!

    So, the movie goes on the premise of what had happened. Or, is it really? I feel like watching the future despite knowing it's something else. This movie is probably more appreciated by those who are or were working in the financial industry and have clues about what really is happening and at stake. For most, it's not really that exciting a movie (too much talking and too little action, according to my cousin). Despite that, I enjoyed it. 



    Acting is great and movie is well paced. The stake is beyond what average people would realized. When it comes to derivatives and all, who really got the exact figure? If you are interested in finding out that humongous number and all that entails, I recommend 3 books:
    1. Boomerang by Michael Lewis
    2. The Growth Map by Jim O'Neill
    3. The Endgame by John Mauldin & Jonathan Tepper

    I read these books just recently and trust me, you have got no idea how messed up things are or if everyone begins to realize that, how messed up our world will become.

    Margin Call, anyone? Check out the Big Short by Michael Lewis for background reading!
    Life is turning interesting!

    P.S. Why do I get the feeling I was watching Richard Fuld at some point?]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/movie/UserReview-Margin_Call-132-1616432-220904-Be_first_.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/movie/UserReview-Margin_Call-132-1616432-220904-Be_first_.html Tue, 7 Feb 2012 15:31:29 +0000
    <![CDATA[ "Insanely Great!"]]> Think Different! which was featured on Lunch), I decided to do another one that focused more on the business aspect of Steve Jobs. He dedicated his life in this arena more so than any other aspects and it seems fitting to highlight what he did and what we can all learn from him.



    This is a man who revolutionalized the world in more way than one. 
    Music, Computers, Communication and essentially LIFESTYLE! To not take him seriously will prove to be fatal for you and your business. Sony learned the hard way!

    I admire the man not just for his success but his innate ability to reinvent himself. In this world of constant change, we all need to learn to reinvent ourselves or else we'll be falling behind and like Kodak, becomes obsolete. 



    His attention to details, his focus on perfection and his distorted field of reality help to drive his team of "A players" to greater heights. He was able to handpick the right people to work for him and to inspire (albeit at times demoralize constantly) people whom he worked with. 

    Here are a few of the themes which I find fascinating:
    • "The idea that John Lasseter pitched was called "Toy Story." It sprang from a belief, which he and Jobs shared, that products have an essence to them, a purpose for which they were made. If the object were to have feelings, these would be based on its desire to fulfill its essence."
       
    • "Like many great men whose gifts are extraordinary, he's not extraordinary in every realm," she said. "He doesn't have social graces, such as putting himself in other people's shoes, but he cares deeply about empowering humankind, the advancement of humankind, and putting the right tools in their hands."
       
    • "I hate it when people call themselves "entrepreneurs" when what they're really trying to do is launch a startup and then sell or go public, so they can cash in and move on. They're unwilling to do the work it takes to build a real company, which is the hardest work in business. That's how you really make a contribution and add to the legacy of those who went before. You build a company that will still stand for something a generation or two from now."
       
    There is no other man on this planet who embraced the philosophy that a company doesn't need a wide array of products to claim a bigger market share. What one needs is one single product that seeks to be perfected and to convey a life of its own to its consumers. iPod was one such product, iPhone was another and iPad yet another. Is iCloud the future of Apple? We'll have to wait and see. But as one would learn from reading the book, it is the only one in the market that integrates the many gadgets we have and streamlined the data (if I read correctly). It is an integrated process (another favorite of Jobs). 

    Although this book is about Steve Jobs, he's not a success without the others who have supported and worked with him. Still, he had keen vision and he believed in his dream. He's also persistent and he did learn his lessons from others (grudgingly at times). Among his respected are artists especially. Steve Jobs the book may well give you some inspiration as to how to conduct and build your business. It may also give you the necessary direction you need to follow in your undertakings. Whatever it is, it is a book filled with morsels for everyone who's keen on business and development. It is a book I'd recommend one to read more than once!]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/book/UserReview-Steve_Jobs_book_-132-1774392-219560-_Insanely_Great_.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/book/UserReview-Steve_Jobs_book_-132-1774392-219560-_Insanely_Great_.html Wed, 25 Jan 2012 07:17:37 +0000
    <![CDATA[Boomerang: Travels in the New Third World Quick Tip by Sharrie]]> http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Boomerang_Travels_in_the_New_Third_World-132-1795247-219505.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Boomerang_Travels_in_the_New_Third_World-132-1795247-219505.html Sun, 22 Jan 2012 02:02:46 +0000 <![CDATA[Michael Lewis Quick Tip by Sharrie]]> Boomerang: Travels in the New Third World and finished it at one go. An excellent read. Moneyball & The Big Short are some of his famous works. Great writer!

    ]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Michael_Lewis-132-1795246-219504.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Michael_Lewis-132-1795246-219504.html Sun, 22 Jan 2012 01:58:24 +0000
    <![CDATA[ Think Different!]]>

     Steve Jobs is not a simple man, despite his ardent quest for simplicity in the products and in life. The guy is a genius, nonetheless. Not just in technology (Bill Gates thinks otherwise) but also in manipulation. Yes, he's the expert in manipulation (both his staff, business associates and the public at large). Distorted reality is his forte. Practiced and played out to perfection. His is a story that will keep readers and fans glued for hours, if not days and weeks.

    No, despite being the recipient of his fabulous product designs (my first Apple was in 1993 before his "2nd coming" and consequently the first iPod, iPod mini, iPod shuffle, iPad but still no iPhone so far! hence, he's hasn't ruled in my world ;-)), I'm not a great fan of his. For some reasons, even before reading the book, I intuitively found him obnoxious! It's something one picks up from instinct if not mannerism. Oh, I'll probably be clobbered by many for having said so since he's like God to so many fans!


    Jobs was not a kind soul (he has hurt many through his quest for perfection although he's also a sensitive man). Some who knew and loved him probably labelled him as psychotic even! Still, you can't help but being enraptured by the tales of his life. He had certainly led a most unusual and distinctive life, not to mention successful, challenging, charismatic, crazy, out of this world and entirely legendary!

    So, it is with an intense, curious fascination that I found myself flipping through the pages for an insight into a "stranger's" life; sometimes associating with him while at other times, uttering the world "jerk" more than once! That is what many who knew him personally went through; associating with him and then confused by him. 

    Ultimately though, most ended up respecting him for his focused belief and all that he had done for Apple and its products, making computers and technology available to all in the world. 


    This is a book with a touch of romance, business acumen and self-improvement all in one. It is about a man with a life well lived and remembered. A man whose influence will probably outlived rulers, entertainers and corporations.

    A man who is "insanely great"!!!]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/book/UserReview-Steve_Jobs_book_-132-1774392-219410-Think_Different_.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/book/UserReview-Steve_Jobs_book_-132-1774392-219410-Think_Different_.html Sun, 15 Jan 2012 05:32:54 +0000
    <![CDATA[Facebook Quick Tip by BaronSamedi3]]> http://www.lunch.com/Awesomeness/reviews/website/UserReview-Facebook-163-1333919-215923.html http://www.lunch.com/Awesomeness/reviews/website/UserReview-Facebook-163-1333919-215923.html Thu, 1 Dec 2011 23:47:42 +0000 <![CDATA[ Your socks are dangerous even if they don't smell :)]]> If you knew what polyester is made from - crude oil and cotton that needs large amounts of water and pesticides - you’d see why cheaper isn’t necessarily better. Polyester is also one of those inventions that has a half life in the years, and will probably still be hanging around when you cease to be.

    Estimating that the average person goes through about six to seven pairs of socks per year and multiply that by the number of years you will live, on average, well - that’s a lot of socks! Pile up all of that polyester, and you’ve got quite a mess. So, instead of adding to the environmental mess, why don’t you try to recycle your socks? After all, they’re durable.

    Here are some ideas of what to do with your old socks instead of filling up another landfill:

    - Repurpose them as cleaning, dust and polishing rags.

    - Use them in hard to clean places, to dust blinds and under appliances. Socks are perfect in that you can slip your hand into them just like a mitten. In that way, you can get into corners and over and under things as easily as you could with your bare hand.

    - Use them as whiteboard erasers.

    - Since they’re elastic, use them to tie vines to stakes for your vegetables and assorted other crashing plants. Believe you me, when you come back in six months, the socks will still be working. Remember, they’re made from polyester.

    - Soap on a rope in the yard. If you have a pool and shower, slip a bar of soap in a sock, and viola, instant hanging soap. I’d avoid using this inside; who wants an old sock of soap hanging in their indoor shower.

    As you can see, there are a lot of things you can do with old socks besides adding them to the landfill mess. It just takes a little creativity and knowledge that you can do just about anything with them and they’re so tough, they’ll probably never run out of uses.

    ]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Socks-132-1487006-215371-Your_socks_are_dangerous_even_if_they_don_t_smell.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Socks-132-1487006-215371-Your_socks_are_dangerous_even_if_they_don_t_smell.html Mon, 14 Nov 2011 19:58:37 +0000
    <![CDATA[ Your socks are dangerous even if they don't smell :)]]> If you knew what polyester is made from - crude oil and cotton that needs large amounts of water and pesticides - you’d see why cheaper isn’t necessarily better. Polyester is also one of those inventions that has a half life in the years, and will probably still be hanging around when you cease to be.

    Estimating that the average person goes through about six to seven pairs of socks per year and multiply that by the number of years you will live, on average, well - that’s a lot of socks! Pile up all of that polyester, and you’ve got quite a mess. So, instead of adding to the environmental mess, why don’t you try to recycle your socks? After all, they’re durable.

    Here are some ideas of what to do with your old socks instead of filling up another landfill:

    - Repurpose them as cleaning, dust and polishing rags.

    - Use them in hard to clean places, to dust blinds and under appliances. Socks are perfect in that you can slip your hand into them just like a mitten. In that way, you can get into corners and over and under things as easily as you could with your bare hand.

    - Use them as whiteboard erasers.

    - Since they’re elastic, use them to tie vines to stakes for your vegetables and assorted other crashing plants. Believe you me, when you come back in six months, the socks will still be working. Remember, they’re made from polyester.

    - Soap on a rope in the yard. If you have a pool and shower, slip a bar of soap in a sock, and viola, instant hanging soap. I’d avoid using this inside; who wants an old sock of soap hanging in their indoor shower.

    As you can see, there are a lot of things you can do with old socks besides adding them to the landfill mess. It just takes a little creativity and knowledge that you can do just about anything with them and they’re so tough, they’ll probably never run out of uses.

    ]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Socks-132-1487006-215371-Your_socks_are_dangerous_even_if_they_don_t_smell.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Socks-132-1487006-215371-Your_socks_are_dangerous_even_if_they_don_t_smell.html Mon, 14 Nov 2011 19:58:37 +0000
    <![CDATA[ Best film of the year - new express review format!]]>
  • I quit watching the latest Pirates movie to watch this. I have no idea what that film was about and why Penelope Cruz still gets acting work. Utter, utter waste of time.
  • Margin Call is tightly written and well paced - remember, just like movies used to be before CGI gave us all the attention span of a coked-up squirrel.
  • The dialog is perfectly written, the acting by everyone is first class, and the whole thing moves like a greased-up ball-bearing on a hill with a fear of magnets.
  • If you hate Goldman Sachs now, wait until you watch this. I'll get the ropes ready so we can go and hang these guys out to dry.
  • There are no guns, shoot outs or explosions - it's just raw drama which makes a pleasant change.
  • This is what the second Wall Street movie should have been before Oliver Stone sold out (and became massively leveraged). Margin Call is a worthy successor. None of that Shia Labeouf nonsense.
  • If you haven't seen it, get it now - Best Film of 2011 thus far.]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/movie/UserReview-Margin_Call-132-1616432-215267-Best_film_of_the_year_new_express_review_format_.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/movie/UserReview-Margin_Call-132-1616432-215267-Best_film_of_the_year_new_express_review_format_.html Wed, 9 Nov 2011 23:12:28 +0000
    <![CDATA[ Dealing Forthrightly With Inequities]]> The Occupation of Wall Street, Zuccotti Park and burgeoning movements across the USA and abroad have a singular aim, which is to achieve a more equitable distribution of wealth to the lower and middle classes. More than a half million dollars in cash, clothing, food and other donations have come to the protesters in Lower Manhattan. Even some elected officials have come to the aid of the protesters. Sub-groups of protesters have emerged all over the United States.

    When the occupation first evolved in Zuccotti Park on or about the night of Sept. 17, only a few hearty souls spent the night. At this point over 200 people including students, union members and other interested parties have joined the occupation.

    The focal point of the movement is summed up as follows: “We are the 99 percent.” Ostensibly, the other one percent are the holders of most of the wealth in the United States. Over the past decades, more money has been flowing to the corporate top echelon as CEO and senior staff average salaries have ballooned from 40 times the entry level salary to 400 times and growing.

    And so, the challenge is to deal with this aspect forthrightly. Only the boards of directors, professional human resource entities within corporate organizations and trade associations have the power, discretion and authority to adjust compensation more equitably throughout the respective member organizations. This is not something that any governmental unit can mandate except through moral suasion and perhaps changes to the tax code.

    A number of corporate organizations have made successful changes in the equitable distribution of profits, among them Ben and Jerry's Ice Cream and Avis. From the outset, Ben and Jerry's set the executive salary structure at a very reasonable level. Avis changed ownership multiple times in the seventies and eighties, becoming employee-owned in 1987.

    President Roosevelt was able to limit executive compensation successfully by ultimately taxing exorbitant salaries at a much higher rate. The basic threshold was over $25,000, or equivalently, $350,000 or so in today's inflated dollar. After $25,000, salary increments were taxed at 90 percent or more. These resources were used to pay down the national debt, which ballooned after the conclusion of World War II, which followed the Great Depression. In the days of the Great Depression, corporate organizations increasingly found other forms of non-cash compensation such as stock options to reward the top corporate executives and alleviate cash flow problems.

    A mainstay of the protest is that the organizational structure is organic or non-hierarchical which may limit the effectiveness of the struggle. The participants have yet to formulate a clear vision with specific goals and conditions precedent to ending the occupation or translating the movement into a political force like The Tea Party movement and others.

    The Civil Rights movement was a proactive movement of people with an important mission to advance civil rights throughout the United States and even beyond. The factor which coalesced the movement was a mission and assertive leadership at the top of the organization.

    Another important dynamic in satisfying the quality of life issues that plague the Wall Street protesters is bringing unemployment and underemployment to much lower levels. The extreme automation, downsizing and computerization of American industry have replaced people with machines at an increasing rate. However, the United States inevitably will experience a labor shortage as the baby boom generation retires this decade and thereafter.

    At bottom, the United States needs to export more goods and services, as well as nourish the growth of new industries and processes such as solar and wind energy, the artificial sun, whole/organic foods production and distribution, electric and natural gas vehicles, the electronic grid, small business, patenting, home remodeling, municipal transport systems and the whole infrastructure area in general.

    The small family farm has been dying for decades. This cottage industry needs to reformulate and grow. This act alone would serve to bring down unemployment, underemployment and food prices, which have been on the rise. 

    Credits: First Published on Blogcritics]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Occupy_Wall_Street-132-1770967-215129-Dealing_Forthrightly_With_Inequities.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Occupy_Wall_Street-132-1770967-215129-Dealing_Forthrightly_With_Inequities.html Tue, 8 Nov 2011 03:56:48 +0000
    <![CDATA[Wikipedia Quick Tip by BaronSamedi3]]> http://www.lunch.com/whatcanisay/reviews/website/UserReview-Wikipedia-232-1333928-214758.html http://www.lunch.com/whatcanisay/reviews/website/UserReview-Wikipedia-232-1333928-214758.html Sat, 29 Oct 2011 20:53:18 +0000 <![CDATA[Steve Jobs (book) Quick Tip by Sharrie]]> http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/book/UserReview-Steve_Jobs_book_-132-1774392-214745.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/book/UserReview-Steve_Jobs_book_-132-1774392-214745.html Sat, 29 Oct 2011 13:02:22 +0000 <![CDATA[ A garden of sprouts]]> TED takes on a new light and life on the iPad 2. Its iPad app made it one of the most pleasurable to watch a video and to learn about others' thought processes and ideas.
     
    In some ways, entering the world of TED is like being in the community of Lunch. You've no clear idea what you'll find. If you are open to collective intelligence, you'll find something of great importance and use to expand and align your consciousness. Often, I subscribed to the idea that when one is ready, one will be presented the tools and knowledge that one needs to acquire in life. And to my delight, TED hastens that process with "teachers" from all walks of life.

     
    So, what is so great about TED on the iPad? I'm specifcially adressing about TED on the iPad as it is the mode that most captivates my interest and also where I made it a point to return for future visits. That is of utmost importance since it is the process of learning taking place in dynamic proportions. Naturally, before I had the iPad I had visited TED on its website. But, a week or two later, I'd have forgotten all about it (hence, no return visit). The iPad delivers the talks effectively wherever I'm. Yes, initially we need the internet connection but the wonder of this particular app makes it a breeze to save my favorite talks on the iPad.
     
    The quallity of videos is something I must applaud. Thanks to the iPad excellent hardware, videos are as great as watching HDTV! Sure, I could save a lot of tv programs but it's not as easy for me to take them to the hair salon, bathroom or the long flight many of us are confined in and totally bored on it. Having said that, the real quality of the talks depend on the speakers. As a whole, TED has many superb speakers with a fanfare of creativity and persuasion. That's what made it such an attractive package! Essentially, what collective and corraborative intelligence on TED does is basically a shift in paradigm!!!

    Here are some of my favorites and uplifting videos from TED. Enjoy...

    On Creativity & Inspiration




    On Travel





    On Economy






    (A Lunch Featured Review)
    ]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-TED_iOS_Application-132-1774815-214733-A_garden_of_sprouts.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-TED_iOS_Application-132-1774815-214733-A_garden_of_sprouts.html Sat, 29 Oct 2011 04:58:51 +0000
    <![CDATA[ An American Tragedy]]> Star Rating:


    During the final months of 2008, most of us bore witness to a chain reaction of financial ruin. Investment firms across the country, seemingly strong, had to declare bankruptcy due mostly to the housing bubble collapse and the subsequent loss of value in real estate pricing. This brought about a shift in the economic structure so drastic, it required nothing less than a congressional bailout. It’s this backdrop against which Margin Call weaves a cold and devastating yet highly compelling tale. By having it take place almost entirely within the walls of a New York investment firm, and by having the characters speak nearly indecipherable financial lingo, writer/director J.C. Chandor does something rather interesting: He completely immerses the audience in the panic and confusion of the period. To make us understand what’s actually being said is not the point.
     
    As the film begins, the firm, which is unnamed but is said to be loosely based on Lehman Brothers, has just seen 80% of its employees laid off. One of the casualties is Eric Dale (Stanley Tucci), the company’s senior risk analyst; his opening scene, in which he’s fired by a team that fires people for a living, is eerily reminiscent of Up in the Air, and about as equally timely. Just before he leaves, he hands a USB drive to a young analyst named Peter Sullivan (Zachary Quinto) – who, for now at least, is still an employee – and instructs him (1) to analyze the data and see if he can finish what was started, and (2) to be careful. Later that night, when many of the employees are out at a bar, Peter plugs in the drive, takes one look at his computer screen, and is immediately disturbed by what he finds. He calls a fellow analyst, Seth (Penn Badgley), who then contacts their supervisor, Will (Paul Bettany), who in turn contacts his boss, Sam (Kevin Spacey). They come back to the office. They too are shocked.

                                                    
                                                     
    What exactly is on that computer screen? We don’t physically see the data, but we do hear a lot of complicated fiscal jargon attempting to make sense of it. It essentially boils down to this: Their firm, as well as the entire market, is headed for disaster. The rest of the film depicts an emergency meeting at the office, one that will last the entire night. Other employees, including the easily mocked Jared Cohen (Simon Baker) and a senior executive named Sarah Robertson (Demi Moore), analyze the data as completed by Peter – and of course, they come to the same inescapable conclusions. The early morning hours will see the arrival of the firm’s CEO via helicopter. This would be John Tuld (Jeremy Irons), who likes to speak in condescending simple terms and insists on those around him doing the same. This includes Peter, who was literally a rocket scientist at one point in his life.
     
    All throughout, most of the characters are defined by intriguing personality quirks. Seth, for example, enjoys speculating on the salaries of his superiors. He doesn’t always wait for the right moment to start talking, either. Will, who alternates between smoking and anxiously chewing on pieces of nicotine gum, doesn’t seem to care how off-putting his cynicism has made him. Funny, how you can grow so weary of the system and yet remain so comfortable in the lifestyle it has afforded you. In one scene on the firm’s rooftop – after briefly leaning over the railing and noting that it’s not about the fear of falling, but about the possibility that you’ll actually jump – he explains to Seth and Peter how easily a $2 million salary can be whittled down to just over $100,000. That figure, I guess, is the wealthy man’s version of the poverty line.

                                                   
                                                     
    All the characters are nicely developed, but not in any usual way. We’re not made to sympathize with them. I would wager that most of them are not, properly speaking, even human beings. They’re motivated not by public service or even by emotions, but by an instinctual need to keep their company afloat. Irons’ character takes a disturbingly Darwinian approach to the problem: The firm will sell off their holdings before the buyers realize they have no value. It’s not about loyalty to customers; it’s simply about survival. The really sad thing is not that he proposed such an idea, but that everyone was resigned to it happening. A scene late in the film, a conversation between Tucci and Moore, is shockingly matter of fact in this regard.
     
    There are only two instances in which emotions get the better of the characters. One involves Seth in a bathroom stall. The other involves Sam, who is genuinely saddened by his dog’s cancer diagnosis. Thematically, this reaches beyond the notion that even soulless corporate drones have the capacity for selflessness; the dog symbolizes the scarceness, frailty, and even the death of innocence. The final shot, which carries this idea even further, is tragic in more ways than one. Margin Call is nothing less than an American tragedy, especially for this very day and age, when the greed and corruption of Wall Street are foremost on everyone’s minds. It will be interesting to revisit this film when and if the country is brought back on track. Will future audiences appreciate that it was made at a time when the economy was in shambles, jobs were hard to land, and all reasonable attempts at financial reform were fought against?

                                                         ]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/movie/UserReview-Margin_Call-132-1616432-214719-An_American_Tragedy.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/movie/UserReview-Margin_Call-132-1616432-214719-An_American_Tragedy.html Fri, 28 Oct 2011 04:00:22 +0000
    <![CDATA[ We Did It My Way]]>
    Put up for closed adoption by unmarried parents who eventually married, rejected by the first would be adoptive parents, then adopted by working class parents, it would be difficult to conceive a more inauspicious beginning, or a more auspicious outcome. Steve Jobs would grow up to prove that an apple can fall quite far from the tree, and still blossom. Abandoned, the chosen one, special.

    Firstly, I don't think there is any such thing as an illegitimate child, only illegitimate parents.

    The public life and business achievements have been well chronicled, and I didn't want to read a book about Apple. I wondered about the family life, the relationship with Bill Gates, were they collaborators or competitors. iWondered how much of Apple's great accomplishments were due to Jobs, what effect his passing would have on the future of Apple. I wondered about how he got the Beatles music, and the reputedly fractious relationship with Apple records.

    Isaacson has put together a narrative never less than fascinating about a mercurial man. My opinion of Jobs did not change much as a result of reading this book. He already struck me as being a highly driven type A personality, narcissistic, aggressive, perfectionistic. Certainly these traits contributed to both his successes and his setbacks, and made him a difficult man to get along with, but those high standards imposed by a passion for the product and a drive for perfection, and a demanding lack of compassion, would also draw out of people abilities, creativity, and great accomplishments.

    Certainly, Isaacson's unvarnished portrait, means many people will not find Jobs the man appealing, and will not condone certain of his behaviors, and I commend Jobs for his honesty in allowing that. Perhaps the biggest surprise that he let go of his controlling tendencies, and did not seek to approve the book.

    Ironically at age 22, he would find himself in the exact same position as his adoptive parents at that age, and would not acknowledge his out of wedlock child Lisa. He would eventually reverse that position before Apple went public agreeing to a DNA test, and making an arrangement. I was interested to discover that he has a lost sister Mona Simpson, an author who has written a book, A Regular Guy : A Novel, the main character based on Jobs and the relationship with his daughter Lisa.

    Nemesis follows hubris with a punishing fall from grace at Apple, betrayed by his hand picked underling, fired by the company he founded, exiled, buying Pixar off George Lucas for $5 million, selling it to Disney for a reputed $500 million, eventually returning as conquering hero to regain his throne. After many lean years the kingdom would once again prosper.

    Among his influences were The Beatles, particularly John Lennon, also rejected by both his parents, and raised by an aunt. The Beatles being greater than the sum of the individual parts would inpsire his own management style of making better products through teamwork. Perhaps more surprising was his relating to Captain Ahab from Moby Dick, and that despotic tyrant King Lear.

    The strength of this book, unfettered access to Jobs, the uncensored commentary and insights, of family, friends, business associates, even enemies, and critics.

    I enjoyed the story of how he met his wife Laurene Powell. Her name is quite similar to my name, Laurence Power, and she has a degree in Economics. I enjoyed the humor and pranks of the early days with Wosniak. I particularly like calling the Vatican prank pretending to be Kissinger, collecting bootleg Dylan recordings, and illicitly mimicing long distance beeps to make free long distance calls. I also enjoyed reading of the reality distortion field sometimes employed effectively, sometimes not. He would one day meet his father in a restaurant but neither would be aware that they met.

    If you're wondering about hardback v Kindle, Kindle has photos. Unlike the book which has a central montage the photos on Kindle are present at the beginning of chapters. Given the price differential between both is so small, I recommend the hardback, as you can resell and regift a hardback, although on the Kindle I like the search features and the ability to search and collect quotes, and make notes and highlights. If you don't already have Kindle, you can download the app here at Amazon, and get a free book sample. By the time you finish reading the sample I predict you will want to read the rest of the book.

    The book did answer most of my questions, yet I do not give it five stars. Here is why:

    Recently, I have bought several quotation books, and when I learned Jobs illness was fatal, I started looking up quotes by Jobs.

    Some quotation books such as Bartlett, Forbes Business quotes, and so forth do not have any Jobs quotes. Oxford and Yale each have two. In fact most quote books do not have many if any quotes by business leaders. Hopefully, this will be addressed. In fact, the The Ultimate Book of Investment Quotations (The Ultimate Series) book I found to be the only decent book that quotes business leaders and investment experts. An important word in the vocbulary of both Gates and Jobs is innovation.

    If you look at the Stanford commencement speech for example, available where video clips are seen, Jobs has many good quotes, shares his wisdom and talks of the importance of curiosity and intuition. Stay hungry. Stay foolish. I understand there are about 100 books due to be published about Jobs.

    While Isaacson's book contains many good quotes, most of these are by other people about Jobs, by Bill Gates, Larry Ellison, Andy Grove, Al Gore and many others. Perhaps my favorite was the Herman Hermits quote by Bono. What I found curiously lacking were so few great quotes by Jobs himself. When I watched the Stanford speech on youtube, I wrote down six or seven quotes from that speech alone. Isaacson references the speech but barely quotes it.

    Certainly, he could have sprinkled some of Jobs best quotes throughout the book. With that I would definitely give five stars. Hopefully, future editions and printings will address this. That would make both an honest depiction and a fitting tribute to a great visionary. I wonder given the platforms and innovations of Jobs, would it not be possible to create a multimedia publication with embedded clips and sound bites from Jobs, and others.

    Jobs: The Beatles all want to be on iTunes, but they and EMI are like an old married couple. They hate each other but can't get divorced.

    Jobs: Picasso had a saying, good artists copy, great artists steal.

    Alan Kay maxim adopted by Jobs: The best way to predict the future is to invent it.

    Tim Cook, Apple CEO: I realised very early that if you didn't voice your opinion he would mow you down. He takes contrary positions to create more discussion because it may lead to a better result. So, if you don't feel comfortable disagreeing, then you'll never survive.

    While reading, three quotes by George Bernard Shaw came to mind:

    The reasonable man adapts himself to the conditions that surround him. The unreasonable man adapts surrounding conditions to himself. All progress depends on the unreasonable man.

    If I give you an apple, and you give me an apple we each have an apple. If I give you an idea, and you give me an idea, we each have two ideas. Jobs certainly turned apples and ideas into dollars).

    Some people see things as they are and ask why. Steve Jobs dreamed things that never were and asked, why not?

    As a result we have iPad, iPod, iPhone, iTunes, iMac, iBooks.

    I think you will enjoy it, and I hope this was helpful.]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/book/UserReview-Steve_Jobs_book_-132-1774392-214681-We_Did_It_My_Way.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/book/UserReview-Steve_Jobs_book_-132-1774392-214681-We_Did_It_My_Way.html Wed, 26 Oct 2011 19:14:17 +0000
    <![CDATA[ The Return of The Order of The Phoenix]]> Trust is what built relationships and relationship is what established corporations. When trust is being manipulated or misplaced by one party of the equation, the whole foundation collapses. That's what the global banking system and governments are "enforcing" on the majority of the world population now. Herein lies the uprising of the worldwide Occupy Wall Street movement.

     
    I was there as an observer (albeit bystander) on Saturday, October 15. In the Chinese saying, the bystander sees clearly (旁观者清). When one is able to remove one's interest (in more way than one) from the equation, one sees enlightenment and solutions.
     
    To change a "corrupted" out of equilibrium world, there are 2 major considerations and components:
    1) Affect - Who?
    2) Effect - What?
     
    How to bring about the desired outcome without toppling the entire human population and how to generate the sum greater than the whole of all its individual parts?

    Most want a banking system to do what it was intended to do. The spirit of banking was good. What had changed over the last 2 decades or so (especially the last one) is the workings and reinforcement of the system. Financial engineering (mastering, according to the insiders) and leveraging by a few selected priveleged individuals have brought PAIN to the society at large, savers and investors alike.
     
    The governments have "consequently" been pulled into the "Ponzi" scheme involuntarily (in some cases, claiming ignorance does not and should not leave them unpunished)! By hook or by crook, they are still in charge and to a larger extent, in daze. Trick or treat? You decide!
     
    In the grand scheme of things, collective enlightenment only comes when the majority wakes up from this slumber. And, I'm glad to see some have! Not nearly enough though but is still comforting to see I'm not the only one in the world!

     
    No, we do not want the banking system to fail. We want a new order, the Order of the Phoenix! Proctect HP (Harry Potter, Human Population at large) and eliminate the wicked Voldemort! There are clearly parasites in the tree of life and if they are not totally removed, it will destroy the entire eco system. Death will be imminent. 
     
    That my friend is my take on Occupy Wall Street 101. What is yours?!

    Related Articles:
    Original Sin
    The World is GREEDY!
    Banking 101 - Systematic Failure
    The financial coup d'etat


    (A Lunch Featured Review)
     ]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Occupy_Wall_Street-132-1770967-214334-The_Return_of_The_Order_of_The_Phoenix.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Occupy_Wall_Street-132-1770967-214334-The_Return_of_The_Order_of_The_Phoenix.html Sun, 16 Oct 2011 13:11:01 +0000
    <![CDATA[Gmail Quick Tip by Sharrie]]> Youtube.com. What is happening and why? Should we be concerned about it? I certainly don't like having my mails moved around... who knows what happen in transition?!?!?!]]> http://www.lunch.com/reviews/d/UserReview-Gmail-694-1333924-214190.html http://www.lunch.com/reviews/d/UserReview-Gmail-694-1333924-214190.html Wed, 12 Oct 2011 16:10:27 +0000 <![CDATA[ A Visionary Who Leaves Behind Quite the iLegacy]]>
    Steve Jobs literally changed the world.  He revolutionized technology and in turn, those products went on to affect many people's lives in positive and profound ways.  His genius-ness enriched our lives through innovations that changed the way that we consume and create music, movie, news, and other information and entertainment, and even changed the way that we communicate with each other, the way we learn, the way we think, and the way we live. 

    Just to name a few. 

    Not to mention that many influential and successful young entrepreneurs in the tech sphere of the past couple of decades cite Steve Jobs as a huge inspiration.

    http://www.podcastingnews.com/content/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/steve-jobs-macintosh-desktop-publishing.jpg

    Looking back on Steve Jobs' life story and experiences, it's apparent that he's lived a colorful and unconventional life with a lot of bumps in the road.  No one could have predicted that someone who lived a life like Steve's to get to the point where he ended up.  He was an accident, born to unwed parents who gave him up for adoption.  His first chosen set of adoptive parents changed their minds about adopting him.  He dropped out of college.  He traveled to India in search of spiritual enlightenment.  He experimented with psychedelics.  He got fired from his own company.  He got diagnosed with cancer.

    Et cetera, et cetera.  You know the story.

    Yet, I'm sure that no one can imagine anyone else but Steve as the one who made Apple what it is today.  Like it says on his tribute on the Apple site, "Steve leaves behind a company that only he could have built".

    No one says it better or tells his story better than Steve himself, nor is there a better way to showcase his charisma.  These two videos will give you the chills, and in light of his passing, especially his third story in the second video:


     

    At only age 56, Steve left us far too soon.  He had so much more living to do and so much more to contribute to the world.  In spite of the multiple medical leave of absences that he took in recent years, he still made it a point to be a part of every major product and strategic decision at Apple.  Looking back on his last years, despite his failing health, it's obvious that he was still brimming with ideas, that he was highly, highly passionate about Apple, technology, and changing the world, and that he had so much more that he wanted to share.  He must have worked right up to the point until he really felt like he physically could not give anymore, only resigning less than a month and a half before his passing.

    "Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose".  Let this be a lesson to us to live life to the fullest and to take risks into the unknown, no matter how scary.  Seriously, go out and live.  Boldly.  Do something.  Find ways to change the world.  Spend a little money if you need to.  You can't take it with you.

    http://thechive.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/steve-jobs-rip.jpg?w=500&h=338

    R.I.P. King of Silicon Valley. 

    Thank you for all that you've shared with us and for being such a visionary and inspiration to so many.]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/public_figure/UserReview-Steve_Jobs-132-1436382-214033-A_Visionary_Who_Leaves_Behind_Quite_the_iLegacy.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/public_figure/UserReview-Steve_Jobs-132-1436382-214033-A_Visionary_Who_Leaves_Behind_Quite_the_iLegacy.html Thu, 6 Oct 2011 08:20:56 +0000
    <![CDATA[ RIP Steve Jobs! The Legacy? Follow Your Heart!]]>

    Death knows no boundaries. It does not recognize nationalities, age, demographics, beauty, bank accounts nor fame. We can't really tell who will live to a ripe old age or who will pass on the next day. All we are left with is how much a person has effected in his lifetime, not how long he has lived.

    Steve Jobs is the inspiration behind this review. You may/may not like him but you can't quite fault his ingenuity or his strategic marketing even if you're his main competitors. I'd choose to think that Jobs passed away at the height of his career. Whatever could be or would be in the future is up to anyone's speculation. For Steve Jobs, he has done more than most of his peers in the technology sector by simply catering to consumers' needs and a step beyond that. He had simplify life for many and facilitated the world's leap to a more connected world.



    He is certainly an icon of our times. Just as Princess Diana was. These are 2 public people whom I woke up unexpectedly to news of their deaths. Shocking? Yes, to quite a degree. They are too young to die and had done a great deal for many in the world. Shocking enough to think about our own mortality and be reminded of our time left in life as well as our place in this life.



    Yet, the death of Steve Jobs translates to an immortality - his spirit, his creativity and his belief about following one's own heart will be here to stay for decades if not centuries and beyond.

    Most of us don't know the man but most of us personally and intimately know his works. We live our days alongside his many creations. We were transformed one way or another by them. So yes, we know the man, well, in a different dogma and dimension. 

    Yes, Steve Jobs is gone for now, but his legacy is here to stay, forever and ever....................


    (A Lunch Featured Review)]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/public_figure/UserReview-Steve_Jobs-132-1436382-214032-RIP_Steve_Jobs_The_Legacy_Follow_Your_Heart_.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/public_figure/UserReview-Steve_Jobs-132-1436382-214032-RIP_Steve_Jobs_The_Legacy_Follow_Your_Heart_.html Thu, 6 Oct 2011 05:49:42 +0000
    <![CDATA[Steve Jobs Quick Tip by Sharrie]]> http://www.lunch.com/iPadfans/reviews/public_figure/UserReview-Steve_Jobs-191-1436382-214027.html http://www.lunch.com/iPadfans/reviews/public_figure/UserReview-Steve_Jobs-191-1436382-214027.html Thu, 6 Oct 2011 03:01:17 +0000 <![CDATA[Hurricane Irene (2011) Quick Tip by BaronSamedi3]]> http://www.lunch.com/whatcanisay/reviews/d/UserReview-Hurricane_Irene_2011_-232-1759878-212858.html http://www.lunch.com/whatcanisay/reviews/d/UserReview-Hurricane_Irene_2011_-232-1759878-212858.html Thu, 1 Sep 2011 17:38:38 +0000 <![CDATA[ The experience with Hurricane Irene is set forth.]]> East Coast through New Jersey, New York City , Connecticut, other parts
    of New England and Canada. The storm was a Category 1 hurricane with
    winds approaching 90 MPH. The most dangerous portions of the storm
    were the many flood surges of rising water which leveled small communities
    and towns in its path. In addition, hurricanes generate tremendous shear
    forces which tear apart infrastructure along the critical path of the storm.

    The hurricane passed over NYC in mid-morning on Sunday. Despite extensive
    preparations including the closure of the NYC Subway , water still rose above
    barriers to flood parts of the downtown Manhattan. Thousands had been
    evacuated previously to higher ground in anticipation of the rising tidewaters.
    Homeowners boarded up small homes and stocked water, flashlights, food
    and other emergency kit items.

    This was the first time that NYC officials took the unusual step of recommending
    evacuation and closing the public transportation system to protect public property
    from the rising waters. Some train yards were on low land. The advanced
    planning allowed transportation officials to re-route trains to higher ground so
    that property could be preserved.

    In New York and New Jersey, thousands of National Guard
    personnel were called to serve. Numerous public service announcements
    informed the public of evacuation deadlines and milestones. Once these exact
    times were reached, the public was instructed to stay in their homes.

    Given the enormity of the task, the operation was executed flawlessly.
    The federal, state and municipal governmental agencies acted in concert
    to preserve life and property. Much can be learned from this experience.

    For instance, the Civil Engineering infrastructure along the coastline requires
    an upgrade to contain flood waters and protect local property, livelihoods
    and life itself. Dams may be reinforced, as well as harbor facilities and beaches.
    Nuclear Power Plant shutdowns should be anticipated for higher category storms.

    The aftermath of a big storm is a good time to update or improve upon existing
    contingency plans and disaster recovery planning documents in both the
    public and private sector. These planning documents should reflect the
    most up-to-date experience with the storm, as well as organizational/ staff changes,
    new vendors and other important contacts.

    The FEMA website has detailed instructions on how to prepare for a hurricane.

    http://www.ready.gov/america/beinformed/hurricanes.html]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Hurricane_Irene_2011_-132-1759878-212213-The_experience_with_Hurricane_Irene_is_set_forth_.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Hurricane_Irene_2011_-132-1759878-212213-The_experience_with_Hurricane_Irene_is_set_forth_.html Mon, 29 Aug 2011 02:44:55 +0000
    <![CDATA[Hurricane Irene (2011) Quick Tip by Count_Orlok_22]]>
    UPDATE:
    Well, after a lot of wind and a lot of rain, the trees are still standing, the power never went out, and everything's already gone pretty much back to normal. The storm just kind of fizzled out. How anticlimactic.]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/thatsbeat/reviews/d/UserReview-Hurricane_Irene_2011_-138-1759878-212208.html http://www.lunch.com/thatsbeat/reviews/d/UserReview-Hurricane_Irene_2011_-138-1759878-212208.html Sun, 28 Aug 2011 19:55:10 +0000
    <![CDATA[Hurricane Irene (2011) Quick Tip by Sharrie]]> Irene. 3 airports in NYC & Philadelphia & Boston airports are closed until the tropical storm (downgraded from hurricane) is over. So, if you are in the Eastern coast of U.S., you are not going anywhere for the next 2 days or so!]]> http://www.lunch.com/airtravel/reviews/d/UserReview-Hurricane_Irene_2011_-129-1759878-212202.html http://www.lunch.com/airtravel/reviews/d/UserReview-Hurricane_Irene_2011_-129-1759878-212202.html Sun, 28 Aug 2011 13:37:19 +0000 <![CDATA[Hurricane Irene (2011) Quick Tip by Sharrie]]>
    Stay safe, Americans!]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Hurricane_Irene_2011_-132-1759878-212201.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Hurricane_Irene_2011_-132-1759878-212201.html Sun, 28 Aug 2011 13:18:26 +0000
    <![CDATA[After America: Get Ready For Armageddon Quick Tip by Sharrie]]>
    So, while I may agree with the author with some of the events, I do not agree with his tone of speech.]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/book/UserReview-After_America_Get_Ready_For_Armageddon-132-1756777-212200.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/book/UserReview-After_America_Get_Ready_For_Armageddon-132-1756777-212200.html Sun, 28 Aug 2011 12:35:04 +0000
    <![CDATA[ Memo to our leaders in Washington: you cannot "spread the wealth around" until it has been earned.]]>
    As you might expect Mark Steyn blames most of our current problems on an ever-expanding and overbearing government. He notes that the problem has been decades in the making but that the Obama administration has taken it to a whole new level. These days Mr. Obama pleads for "compromise" but there was no compromise as his administration and the leaders in Congress rammed TARP, stimulus, Obamacare and the takeover of the car companies down our collective throats. Obama's modus operandi has been to reward his friends and punish his political enemies. The reality is that his policies have been an abject failure. There are no jobs for tens of millions of people. Meanwhile, private sector workers are being squeezed to pay for lavish pensions and benefits for unionized government workers and for ever more generous benefits for those on welfare. And as Steyn points out in "After America" these problems are being exacerbated by the fruits of "multiculturalism", an approach that is largely responsible for a pronounced lack of unifying principles in the country. What we are left with is a nation evenly divided between those who oppose big government and the people who depend on it.

    In "After America: Get Ready for Armageddon" Mark Steyn devotes a significant amount of time to the issue of illegal immigration. Steyn points out that by a margin of roughly 70/30 Americans are demanding that our borders be secured and existing immigrations laws be enforced while the administration and their accomplices in the mainstream media continue to pursue policies that would result in amnesty for these people....a total disconnect. Then there is the whole issue of education. How much time do you have? Did you know that in 1940 a majority of the American population had no more than an 8th grade education? These days around 40% of 18 to 24 year olds are enrolled in college. Steyn argues passionately that "the massive expansion of American education is evidence not of progress but of the exact opposite--its decay into ideological factory farms. It's a progressive 4-H: Hogwash, Hypersensitivity, Habituation, Homogeneity--for the price of which you end up in Hock." I completely concur. Steyn also believes that the class and racial divisions that have been fostered by the American Left could very well result in much of urban and suburban America looking like Detroit. It will be the predators (the permanent underclass created by these inane policies) vs. the prey (the ever-shrinking working class folk). I grew up and still live not too far from the inner city and as I indicated earlier this scenario is not as far-fetched as you might think.

    So it seems to me that it all boils down to this: "what kind of America do you want to live in?" Do you want to live in a nation where the government decides that it is illegal for an 88 year old woman in Pennsylvania to sell a homemade pie baked in her kitchen at a church fish fry? Or do you prefer an America where you are free to pursue happiness and prosperity? If you are someone who has been sitting on the sidelines watching the passing parade the time has come for you to take a stand. Reading "After America: Get Ready for Armageddon" would be an excellent way to get up to speed on these monumentally important issues.   Highly recommended!]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/book/UserReview-After_America_Get_Ready_For_Armageddon-132-1756777-212127-Memo_to_our_leaders_in_Washington_you_cannot.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/book/UserReview-After_America_Get_Ready_For_Armageddon-132-1756777-212127-Memo_to_our_leaders_in_Washington_you_cannot.html Thu, 25 Aug 2011 19:04:00 +0000
    <![CDATA[ A Recessionary Proof Investment! Read to find out why!]]>
    Just as the stock markets are being "reinvented", our online and computing experiences are also being transformed by the iPad (currently the iPad 2). I haven't believed our leaders' resolutions to revamp the financial institutions to a large extent for almost 3 years now. There are many reasons but greed is largely one of them. It's just like governments knowing smoking is bad and yet because of the lucrative intakes from cigarettes sales, we still see them selling in many countries and cities. Well, arguments can be made for and against that but that's not the crux of this review. We are not concerned with smokers.

    So, the story of the week has to be the crashing of worldwide stock markets. AND, the establishing of new highs in the Gold prices. Have you invested in Gold? If you've, congratulations!



    Now, THE next investment. The iPad!
    No, I was not one of those who got onto the bandwagon simply because it's cool to own an iPhone or iPad. I still haven't got an iPhone to date considering I'm an early adopter of technology, I've lagged behind. So, you can't fault me for being on the bandwagon. It's not that I don't like Apple either. I had a Macintosh when people didn't and back in the early 90s I paid some US$10000 for those antiques! I also had a Mac Mini and a Macbook Air plus the iPod. 

    Why the late adoption of the iPhone and the iPad?
    Well, by the time I got all the Apple products, I found that I haven't used as much of them as I'd have had my PC! And, on top of them, for most part, Apple products are proprietary. That gets on my nerves, a great deal! That's also part of the reason why this is a +4 and not a +5. No Flash and a little heavy on the weight which I do think Apple can improve on are the other reasons.

    However, after having test-drive it for 3 days or so last week, and considering the investment environment we are currently undergoing, I do believe the iPad 2 will make a worthy investment in the days to come. We are seeing a switch, albeit an unrecognized one and an accidental one, to the tablet world. I even thought to myself that I've bought my last laptop this year! It shall be tablets from now on. And who better than the iPad which had already capture a large and majority chunk of the tablets market share? 



    The trend is set, as with the market's! While it's up for the iPad, it's down for the markets. If there is any connection between the two, it's to buy the Apple stocks when the markets hit bottom! When? That's a question you've to answer for yourself! ;-)

    IF you're still not convinced, you'd take heart in that it'll be a boon for your eyes reading the updates on Reuters, WSJ, CNN and stock updates! And, if you've to leave your desk your eyes could still be glued to your investments! Should you be trading at this time of the year, watch your investments like a hawk! Do NOT blink!!!


    Lastly but not least, the irony?
    Creation of Jobs!
    And since the iPad is created by Jobs, it will be recessionary proof!!!]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-iPad_2-132-1716359-211360-A_Recessionary_Proof_Investment_Read_to_find_out.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-iPad_2-132-1716359-211360-A_Recessionary_Proof_Investment_Read_to_find_out.html Thu, 11 Aug 2011 04:38:27 +0000
    <![CDATA[iPad 2 Quick Tip by Sharrie]]> http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-iPad_2-132-1716359-211359.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-iPad_2-132-1716359-211359.html Thu, 11 Aug 2011 04:06:32 +0000 <![CDATA[Gold Quick Tip by Sharrie]]>
    Gold rules! Staggering losses in stock markets around the world! More bloodshed if governments are unable to calm the markets!

    ]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Gold-132-1426901-211299.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-Gold-132-1426901-211299.html Tue, 9 Aug 2011 03:03:41 +0000
    <![CDATA[ Nowhere to run!]]>
    Well, if you are the few lucky ones who are debt free and still have lots of extra cash or financial papers or real estate, then congratulation to you. This is not of a survival matter. Whatever you have are more than you need and you can afford more than the rest of the world. You'll have your advisors to tell you what to do. No worries there.

    For those who are scrapping by, this is a real bad news as we'll eventually see interest move up in the future. And if you have debt or funds to pay up these debt, time to pay up unless it's one of the fixed rate. Most of us will not have so much funds to pay up our entire loans or mortgages, that's why we took up the loan to begin with!!! Or for selected few, it is taking advantage of the low rates! 

    So, what do you do if you do not have much cash and lots of real estates? If you can get them out at a good price (ie. still making money or even to the extent of losing some), it might just be a good idea to stay a little more liquid. Do not be greedy and think you can make huge sums of money these days. The idea is to just maintain your capital and not lose your money to devaluation!



    Yes, the word is devaluation. One of the reasons why real estate is so popular and sought after in Asia. As soon as inflation creeps up, a lot of funds will move into physical assets like properties and gold so as to keep its value. Gold is already hitting new high of almost US$1700 as I'm writing this! It was already forecasted to hit some US$2000 in short term. Cash is fast becoming worthless as the US$ plunges as with the Euros. Other than some stronger currencies (in relativity to) like the Swiss Francs, Yen, Chinese Yuan and Singapore Dollar, the rest of the world is seeing their money turning into ashes. 

    Inflation is the evil in the investing community. We have seen countries like Argentina, Brazil, Indonesia and to some extent Russia losing their currency values in the past and having to cope with hard times. This is nothing new in the world, not to mention Zimbabwe's sky high inflation. Many African countries are suffering from this condition. What is new now is that developed countries have not had that much experience with it. So, when rich countries and highly developed markets turned poorer and being seen as unable to honor their debts, what do the world do? 

    When it comes to money, people are very much self-serving. This is coming from me and through my many years of experience in the finance industry. No one is an exception here. Well, almost no one. So, don't be deluded into thinking your neighbors are going to help you through hard times for an extended period of time. Sometimes, even your children or parents won't! You've to rely on yourself to get out of your bad shape, kinda like going on diet. No external help can do other than your own resolve. So, as with United States debt, only its people can do something about it. If not, be prepared for devaluation in the US$. It will come, be certain about that. By how much, that's the question you should be asking. 

    Conservatively, I put it at around 20%. That's not hefty. In fact, many countries have seen their currencies "cut" by half in the process. And, that's an overnight thing. So, staying liquid means not staying all in US$ if you're American. Neither is it all in cash!



    I do not like stocks now and neither do I like bonds. Gold is not the thing to keep for the long term as it had already doubled from its previous historical high. I can't tell you what to do but this is what I do if I've a hefty sums of money. I'd park it in some strong currencies and gold (may be 10% just for insurance). I'll wait for the time to buy land plot (although not easy to find in prime areas but you've got to see beyond the current prime areas but if you have enough funds, the idea is not to get yourself involved in the markets and instead go around to look for prime plots) and some prime real estate (perhaps even in the US as long as I don't have to take up mortgages on them). The idea is not to be subjected to high interest rates. As soon as rates go up, you can be sure that lots of people will be forced to liquidate their investments in real estate. And when that happened without anyone to take over, you will get real good value. So, be ready to take that chance when it happens!

    One worrying trend is the riots and people taking to the streets, even in the developed world. Joblessness will make people do "crazy" things and will topple governments. That's one turmoil we all have to be ready for. How to be ready for some form of "turmoil"? Stock up on daily essentials. This is THE insurance anyone has to be ready for. When a country is without government and we know the risk is high nowadays, you still need to eat and to be able to stay safe in your home. When the supermarkets are not opened, when there is no cash out of your bank ATMs, that's something that you should have at the back of anyone's mind. Especially if you have kids at home. In addition, with the surging inflation, the best money you could "make" and save is in stocking up essentials before the prices shot up by ten and ten of percentage!

    I do think we'll see some countries lose decade of growth like the Japanese did. Which country? Well, it's anyone's guess although the ones with the most debt will find it hard to see sunshine from the deep pit! 

    Last but not least, recoveries through the printing of money is not real recovery. We all need to sell something to make our living. Same for any country. What is the United States going to sell now that it has capitalize on its reputation for quite some time? Military expertise? Technology? Land and resources? Immigration policy? That's a question I hope I've answer to, but unfortunately, I don't!

    Hail Mary!

    P.S. If you watch this interview, you might have spotted the Freudian slip there. Expect another credit rating downgrade on the Treasuries is not a far-fetched thought!

    ]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-S_P_Downgrade_of_United_States_Credit_Rating-132-1755777-211267-Nowhere_to_run_.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-S_P_Downgrade_of_United_States_Credit_Rating-132-1755777-211267-Nowhere_to_run_.html Mon, 8 Aug 2011 03:38:45 +0000
    <![CDATA[S&P Downgrade of United States' Credit Rating Quick Tip by Sharrie]]>

    ]]>
    http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-S_P_Downgrade_of_United_States_Credit_Rating-132-1755777-211221.html http://www.lunch.com/businessmatters/reviews/d/UserReview-S_P_Downgrade_of_United_States_Credit_Rating-132-1755777-211221.html Sun, 7 Aug 2011 01:21:30 +0000
    <![CDATA[ All for "nothing"!]]> ItIt makes me wonder, is this a show of hands or is it simply a camouflage to the world? This tussle about the debt ceiling looks to me (possibly just me since I don't hear anyone talk about this "idea") like a signal to the world that should United States one day has to answer to its many debtors, it's a case of "we had tried our best to resolve the issue" rather than having to swallow the bitter pill wIt makes me wonder, is this a show of hands or is it simply a camouflage to the world? This tussle about the debt ceiling looks to me (possibly just me since I don't hear anyone talk about this "idea") like a signal to the world that should United States one day has to answer to its many debtors, it's a case of "we had tried our best to resolve the issue" rather than having to swallow the bitter pill when the day comes.I 
    I wrote the following review before the announcement of the credit rating cut by S&P. As it turns out, more tremors would probably be felt in the markets in the next week/s.



    As we all know it, when a country has to ask for a loan via the IMF or as did Greece ask its neighbors for support, the country has to come up with some tough measures. In the event that the U.S. will have to default on its loans one fine day, it can just say to the world it did try measures within itself even before it comes to that stage in life!
     
    Majority of Lunch readers are American. So, this is a bitter pill to swallow. The day of reckoning will come, just as all of us who consumed and borrowed too much. Everyone alive will have to face that dreadful day. No country or individual will be exempted, it's simply a matter of time. Naturally, human tendencies are to drag things until one can't and at times when luck is shining upon us, we scrapped through. Will the U.S. still be favored? Is it not too late now you say? Personally, I think it's already too late. As we all know, in business, when things are not salvagable, the only measures is to write it off! Yes, all of it! To write off one's debt? Not as bad as it sounds. For a couple of years or at times decades, it's a loss of reputation and whatever privilege one has been accorded with. With time though, things are forgotten and the involved party can start to rebuild that reputation and "empire" again. So, it won't be a bad thing should the U.S. simply swallow its pride and work hard again, right from the bottom.

    It's a foregone conclusion, as far as I'm concerned, that the U.S. will have to devalue its dollars, if not already. How much more? Perhaps another 20% conservatively. The tough part is not in devaluing but in the decade thereafter. The next 10 years or even 20 years will be the toughest in America's recent history. It's nothing new though, Britain had faced it, Spain had, Argentina had and many Asian countries have had too. So, this is the bad news for America, unfortunately. It's not the end of the world. It's just the end of a world that we are all well acquainted with. We will see major upheavals in the finance and business world very soon. The worst has yet to come and we are probably going to see dark clouds with major thunderstorms anytime in the next 24 months. Nothing an individual can do about, just be well prepared and know what to do when the typhoons or tsunamis hit our shore! 



    According to CNNMoney, "The move is unprecedented -- and the effects unclear."

     
    It's a foregone conclusion, as far as I'm concerned, that the U.S. will have to devalue its dollars, if not already. How much more? Perhaps another 20% conservatively. The tough part is not in devaluing but in the decade thereafter. The next 10 years or even 20 years will be the toughest in America's recent history. It's nothing new though, Britain had faced it, Spain had, Argentina had and many Asian countries have had too. So, this is the bad news for America, unfortunately. It's not the end of the world. It's just the end of a world that we are all well acquainted with. We will see major upheavels in the finance and business world very soon. The worst has yet to come and we are probably going to see dark clouds with major thunderstorms anytime in the next 24 months. Nothing an individual can do about, just be well prepared and know what to do when the typhoons or tsunamis hit our shore!is it simply a camouflage to the world? This tussle about the debt ceiling looks to me (possibly just me since I don't hear anyone talk about this "idea") like a signal to the world that should United States one day has to answer to its many debtors, it's a case of "we had tried our best to resolve the issue" rather than having to swallow the bitter pill when the day comes.
     
    As we all know it, when a country has to ask for a loan via the IMF or as did Greece ask its neighbors for support, the country has to come up with some tough measures. In the event that the U.S. will have to default on its loans one fine day, it can just say to the world it did try measures within itself even before it comes to that stage in life!
     
    Majority of Lunch readers are American. So, this is a bitter pill to swallow. The day of reckoning will come, just as all of us who consumed and borrowed too much. Everyone alive will have to face taht dreadful day. No country or individual will be exempted, it's simply a matter of time. Naturally, human tendencies are to drag things until one can't and at times when luck is shining upon us, we scrapped through. Will the U.S. still be favored? Is it not too late now you say? Personally, I think it's already too late. As we all know, in business, when things are not salvagable, the only measures is to write it off! Yes, all of it! To write off one's debt? Not as bad as it sounds. For a couple of years, it's a loss of reputation and whatever privilege one has been accorded with. With time though, things are forgotten and the involved party can start to rebuild that reputation and "empire" again. So, it won't be a bad thing should the U.S. simply swallow its pride and work hard again, right from the bottom.
     
    It's a foregone conclusion, as far as I'm concerned, that the U.S. will have to devalue its dollars, if not already. How much more? Perhaps another 20% conservatively. The tough part is not in devaluing but in the decade thereafter. The next 10 years or even 20 years will be the toughest in America's recent history. It's nothing new though, Britain had faced it, Spain had, Argentina had and many Asian countries have had too. So, this is the bad news for America, unfortunately. It's not the end of the world. It's just the end of a world that we are all well acquainted with. We will see major upheavels in the finance and business world very soon. The worst has yet to come and we are probably going to see dark clouds with major thunderstorms anytime in the next 24 months. Nothing an individual can do about, just be well prepared and know what to do when the typhoons or tsunamis hit our shore!
    ]]>
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