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Lunch » Tags » Books » Reviews » A Bold Fresh Piece of Humanity » User review

An overall good and funny memoir by a no-holds-bar anchor and journalist.

  • May 8, 2013
  • by
Rating:
+5
Like many, I too am an admirer of Bill O'Reilly and of the Fox News Network. I enjoy the O'Reilly Factor primarily because he is a man with common sense who cuts through the bull of Washington politics, among other assorted issues. He calls a spade a spade and does not gloss over important issues for the sake of cronyism or political bias. He lets his temper flare against both sides of the political spectrum. Irrelevant of party affiliation, if a person or a group in the public limelight is doing something unethical and corrupt, he is on them like a pitt bull, an ever watchful reporter who relies solely on the facts. How rare in this day and age. Most of the networks and newspapers are just dripping with easy questions and compliments. Look at NBC and the New York Times, for instance.

Aside from the above, O'Reilly's memoir was a truly pleasant read. It was not a magnum opus of autobiographical literature. Yet, in some cases, it was better than that, because it was refreshing and not pretentious, as all too many memoirs unfortunately have a tendency to be. In his book, he reflects a lot on his dad, a good man who worked hard but did so without passion. He accepted his lot. Part of O'Reilly's book explores the pursuit of an ideal and the initiative that is involved to make that ideal a reality; it is laborious and time consuming. But if it is worth pursuing, blood, sweat and tears must be involved. I don't think Mr. O'Reilly shed tears, though. His tenacity just propelled him. Also included are his reflections on his Catholic upbringing and the one or two friends that he hung around with, causing havoc on any who dared cross their path. I laughed aloud in the chapter dealing with Sister Mary Thomas, a nun who just loved to have the challenge of having him and his friend Clem in her class: "I'm looking forward to having you two gentlemen in my class next year." Page 80. For Bill O'Reilly, "No more frightening words were ever spoken." Page 80. In the way that he describes Sister Thomas, I believe him: "If Ivan the Terrible had a sister, she would have been Sister Mary Thomas, a nun whose great regret in life was that she missed the Inquisition." Page 77. The book is filled with many witty and moving recollections that are imbued with rich life experience and wisdom. But they are not sappy and overblown, just straightforward and appreciative. On page 66, O'Reilly's report card is showcased, and the only comment written in it is: "Socializes quite freely, yet resents correction!" When asked to explain himself to his father, O'Reilly's terse answer is "I'm popular." His dad's reply was "Get less popular."

A Bold Fresh Piece of Humanity was a good book, a work possessing tidbits of personal memories that were roughly coalesced, each frame of thought painting a picture of the various people, values, trips, experiences, joys and sorrows that had a profound influence on Mr. O'reilly's life. It is very relatable on a human level, and I think that people on both sides of the political party would be able to see a little bit of themselves in the human truths that he offers. A worthy read.
An overall good and funny memoir by a no-holds-bar anchor and journalist.

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More A Bold Fresh Piece of Humanity reviews
review by . February 20, 2010
This is quite an interesting book. When you read it, you find a kinder, gentler person than the sometimes annoying interrupting know-it-all on his tv show. Bill O'Reilly thinks he knows something about everything, and he isn't reluctant to share that belief with anyone.    Being a lawyer, I really get steamed when he argues the law with his female lawyer guests and, in his most pontifical mode, "tells them where they're wrong". I always yell at the tv 'Go to law school before …
review by . June 18, 2009
Like many, I too am an admirer of Bill O'Reilly and of the Fox News Network. I enjoy the O'Reilly Factor primarily because he is a man with common sense who cuts through the bull of Washington politics, among other assorted issues. He calls a spade a spade and does not gloss over important issues for the sake of cronyism or political bias. He lets his temper flare against both sides of the political spectrum. Irrelevant of party affiliation, if a person or a group in the public limelight is doing …
review by . November 21, 2008
As the book jacket of A Bold Fresh Piece of Humanity says, "this time it's personal." Bill O'Reilly, the man so many folks love to hate (please don't get Barney Frank started), this time around explains how he came to be the man he is. While it is doubtful that his detractors will read the book, those who admire O'Reilly, or at the least find him to be entertaining, will probably enjoy this one.    Bill O'Reilly, born in 1949, seems to have always been a bit of a rebel despite …
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The year was 1957, the month September, and I had just turned eight years old. Dwight Eisenhower was President, but in my life it was the diminutive, intense Sister Mary Lurana who ruled, at least in the third-grade class where I was held captive. For reasons you will soon understand, my parents had remanded me to the penal institution of St. Brigid’s School in Westbury, New York, a cruel and unusual punishment if there ever was one.

Already, I had barely survived my first two years at St. Brigid’s because I was, well, a little nitwit. Not satisfied with memorizing the Baltimore Catechism’s fine prose, which featured passages like “God made me to show his goodness and to make me happy with him in heaven,” I was constantly annoying my classmates and, of course, the no-nonsense Sister Lurana. With sixty overactive students in her class, she was understandably short on patience. For survival, she had also become quick on the draw.

Then it happened. One day I blurted out some dumb remark, and Sister Lurana was on me like a panther. Her black habit blocked out all distractions as she leaned down, looked me in the eye, and uttered words I have never forgotten: “William, you are a bold, fresh piece of humanity.”

And she was dead-on.

One day in 1957, in the third-grade classroom of St. Brigid’s parochial school, an exasperated Sister Mary Lurana bent over a restless young William O’Reilly and said, “William, you are a bold, ...

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ISBN-10: 0767928822
ISBN-13: 978-0767928823
Author: Bill O'Reilly
Genre: Biographies & Memoirs
Publisher: Broadway Books
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