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Brewer's British Royalty

A book by David Williamson

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A good, if not spectacular, basic reference

  • Nov 23, 1998
Rating:
+3
Though not perfect, this is a useful basic reference to the history of Britain's Royal Family. Most of the emphasis is on the individuals who made up that history, and so whether you're researching Diana, Princess of Wales, or Gruffydd ap Rhys I, Prince of Deheubarth (1090-1137), you'll find at least enough info here to get you started.

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Andrew S. Rogers ()
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Wiki

Anglophiles and royal watchers should enjoy this volume from the publisher ofBrewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable(HarperCollins, 1995), now in its fifteenth edition. The author, David Williamson, is also the coeditor ofDebrett's Peerage and Baronetage(St. Martin's Press, 1995).

The approximately 1,500 articles are arranged alphabetically and include entries not only for kings and queens but also for historical events, ceremonies, titles, residences, royal traditions, legends, and myths. The reader can find information here on Zadoc the Priest, the coronation anthem; the Bayou Tapestry depicting the Norman Conquest; Xit, the court dwarf of Edward VI; and Looty, Queen Victoria's pet Pekingese. There are entries for the earliest rulers, beginning with the mythical Brutus, the Trojan, up to the royals of the present day. The longest entries are for monarchs: Henry VIII's entry occupies more than three pages, and Queen Victoria's is almost as long. Information on major figures can be found in many other sources, but Williamson also provides tidbits on numerous less well known people. One would search in vain in the recently published Columbia Companion to British History [RBB Mr 15 97] for information on Louis, Louisa, Queen Victoria's dresser; or Louisa, Princess, Queen of Denmark, the fifth daughter of George II; or Louisa Maria Theresa Stuart, Princess, the eighth daughter of James II.

There is an extensive system of cross-references, including see references from variants of ...

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Details

ISBN-10: 0304344273
ISBN-13: 978-0304344277
Author: David Williamson
Publisher: Cassell

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