|
Movies Books Music Food Tv Shows Technology Politics Video Games Parenting Fashion Green Living more >

Lunch » Tags » Books » Reviews » Fahrenheit 451 » User review

Fahrenheit 451 (book)

A novel by Ray Bradbury

< read all 46 reviews

A dystopian cautionary tale

  • Apr 11, 2010
  • by
Rating:
+4
Fahrenheit 451 is one of the most famous works of science fiction, and with "Brave New World" and "1984" represents one of the most memorable and haunting dystopias. In a future world, books are banned and firemen actually set fires instead of extinguishing them. The state exercises a form of social control through controlling what sort of information people have access to. It turns out that not all books are banned, only those that we would today consider "great works" - Plato, Shakespeare, The Bible, Darwin, etc. For me one of the biggest surprises about Fahrenheit 451 was the rationale that was offered for the burning of those books. In a nutshell, they offended politically correct sensibilities and the authorities felt that they would undermine the social cohesion. This expunging of the classics from the culture has an uncanny resonance with the attempts over past few decades to expunge them from the undergraduate liberal arts curriculum. And rationale is also similar: these books are not "diverse" enough and may offend the sensibilities of an ever-increasing list of "minorities." It is hard not to wonder if a milder, softer version of dystopian future that Bradbury was worried about in the early 1950s has not in fact arrived.

Bradbury's writing and ideas are somewhere between those of George Orwell and Philip K. Dick. His style is very engaging, and even poetic. His writing is at its best when one of his characters engages in a prolonged monolog. However, the plot development could use some improvement. There is very little in terms of transition from one scene to the next, and most scenes are overly compressed. It is very hard to follow the plot developments at times. Nonetheless, Bradbury is a wonderful stylist and unlike much of science fiction this book is a pleasure to read on a purely literally level as well as for its sweeping ideas.

As a last note, I found it incredibly ironic that I read this book on Kindle. Based on this alone I am fairly optimistic that reading and great books will not only survive but in fact thrive well into the 21st century.

What did you think of this review?

Helpful
3
Thought-Provoking
3
Fun to Read
3
Well-Organized
3
Post a Comment
More Fahrenheit 451 reviews
review by . April 26, 2010
Fahrenheit 451: A Powerful and Thought-Provoting Novel
In 1966, Ray Bradbury wrote: "I find now, after the fact, chances are Fahrenheit 451 might be around for a few years." At that time the short novel, originally published in book form in 1953, had "been around" for 13 years. In 2003 it celebrated its 50th year in print, and now, in 2010, it is still as popular as ever. Why has this story had such longevity? Is it because Bradbury reversed a widely accepted premise--instead of putting out fires, future firemen start them? Is it …
review by . June 24, 2010
"We need not to be let alone. We need to be really bothered once in a while. How long is it since you were really bothered? About something important, about something real?" cries Montag in Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451. Montag, a fireman, is upset after having witnessed a woman who had chosen to die with her collection of books rather than leave them behind. In his world, however, firemen do not fight fires; they start them.      Bradbury’s 1953 science …
review by . May 21, 2010
I first read this book in middle school as part of an assigned reading course. I found it frightening and intense then in the same way 1984 is. Reading it again as an adult shines a whole new light on how this work has disturbingly captured the issues of American society that transformed from possibly relevant in 1953 to truly pertinent in today's world.
Quick Tip by . August 14, 2010
Read this in High school. A classic that should be read by all. As a Freemason I have had to memorize all the ritual by hear by having another brother mason recite it to me and I repeated it back, just like in 451. I like that connection allot.
Quick Tip by . July 29, 2010
One of the greatest books about why books matter. An easy read, but sticks with you.
Quick Tip by . July 15, 2010
Better you read it while you can. Nice story. You can also check out the movie. This is an amazing "what if" novel.
Quick Tip by . July 13, 2010
Ray Bradbury has a unique style of writing. Pick up this book and take some time to note his distinctive voice.
Quick Tip by . July 12, 2010
Oh my which book would I be? Is it best for me to choose or someone else? The honor! The responsibility! The Gift!
Quick Tip by . July 11, 2010
Interesting message from a prolific, renowned author but descriptive writing style not particular engaging.
Quick Tip by . July 06, 2010
I had to read this for my English class once and however, I found it to be boring and not so entertaining. It actually is a good story. Other people seem to enjoy it.
About the reviewer
Bojan Tunguz ()
Ranked #53
I am a benevolent rascal. I love lounging in bed on a Sunday morning. Rainy days make me melancholy, but in a good kind of way. I am an incorrigible chocoholic. I hate Mondays, but I get over it by Wednesday. … more
Consider the Source

Use Trust Points to see how much you can rely on this review.

You
tunguz
Your ratings:
rate more to improve this
About this book

Wiki

Fahrenheit 451 is a dystopian novel by Ray Bradbury which was first published in 1953.

The novel presents a future American society in which the masses are hedonistic and critical thought through reading is outlawed. The central character, Guy Montag, is employed as a "fireman" (which, in this future, means "bookburner"). The number "451" refers to the temperature at which book paper combusts. Although sources contemporary with the novel's writing gave the temperature as 450 °C (842 °F), Bradbury is believed to have thought "Fahrenheit" made for a better title; however, in an introduction to the 40th anniversary edition of the novel, Bradbury states that a person he spoke with at the local fire department said "Book-paper catches fire at 451 degrees Fahrenheit". The "firemen" burn them "for the good of humanity". Written in the early years of the Cold War, the novel is a critique of what Bradbury saw as issues in American society of the era.
view wiki

Details

ISBN-10: 0345342968
ISBN-13: 978-0345342966
Author: Ray Bradbury
Genre: Intelligent Science Fiction, Political and Social Satire
Publisher: Ballantine Books
Date Published: 1966
Polls with this book
1984 (British first edition)

Books

by

First to Review
© 2014 Lunch.com, LLC All Rights Reserved
Lunch.com - Relevant reviews by real people.
()
This is you!
Ranked #
Last login
Member since
reviews
comments
ratings
questions
compliments
lists