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A Respectful and Introspective Look at Faith

  • Mar 28, 2010
Rating:
+3
I may be the only person in America who hadn't yet read Mitch Albom. If so, he has officially saturated the market as I just finished Have a Little Faith.

Albom writes poignantly without pretentious wordiness but instead his factual sportswriter training comes through. In Have A Little Faith he writes three connected stories. One is about a rabbi, Mitch's only rabbi, who asks Mitch to write his date-to-be-determined eulogy. Mitch doesn't know "the Reb" outside of "the Man of God," bigger-than-life, sainted rabbi of Mitch's formative years, so he begins to visit with "the Reb." Between visits and the story of the human being he unearths, Mitch shares a winding journey of his own slip from faith and the longing he has to rediscover it. Finally, he tells the story of a reformed drug addict who preaches in a church with a funding problem as big as the hole in the roof.

Memoirs, especially one's containing faith journeys, are showing up more and more on my to-read stack. Untainted by preconceived expectations because I hadn't read Tuesdays with Morrie, I opened Have a Little Faith with a blank check list. I found much I liked in this one. Albom's experiences with these men of faith, and those who had little faith at all, caused me to stop and consider my own faith. Why do I believe what I do? Is it tradition and connection to those who've gone before me and those who will remember me? Or is my faith based on a God whom I've seen working on my behalf? Or is my faith the result of seeing the God of miracles and marvels who inexplicably loves me though I've behaved so badly? Or maybe it's a mixture of imperfect people, a God who seems to care but feels unapproachable, and a longing that drives me to seek Him. I think it's a very good idea to occasionally check our motivations, drives and needs to see why we believe what we believe. A respectful and wistful look at faith and hope is a great place to start that inventory of beliefs, and this book delivers.

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More Have a Little Faith: A True St... reviews
review by . July 09, 2010
It is true that this book’s title is have a little faith, with no capital letters, and seems to focus on faith. However, it would be more truthful to say that its theme is “coping,” a word that I did not find in the book, and “love” and “hope,” two words found in the volume’s last sentence. The last word, and probably the books principal theme, is “hope.” One might wonder why Albom, the best-selling author of Tuesdays with Morrie and …
review by . April 05, 2010
Have a Little Faith is the story of two men. Albert Lewis (Mitch Albom's childhood Rabbi from New Jersey) and Henry Covington (an inner-city priest in Detroit). Two men who really have nothing in common except for their faith and the inspiration they bring to their congregation and those who they are in contact with.    Mitch no longer resides in Jersey and finds it rather odd that he is asked by his Rabbi, Albert Lewis (a/k/a "The Reb"), to write his eulogy. Firstly, it's been …
review by . February 14, 2010
It is true that this book's title is have a little faith, with no capital letters, and seems to focus on faith. However, it would be more truthful to say that its theme is "coping," a word that I did not find in the book, and "love" and "hope," two words found in the volume's last sentence. The last word, and probably the books principal theme, is "hope."  One might wonder why Albom, the best-selling author of Tuesdays with Morrie and other best-sellers, chose to display the title in non-caps. …
review by . October 29, 2009
Have a Little Faith by Mitch Albom is a true story about understanding what faith really means. When Albom's rabbi, nicknamed Reb, asks him to give the eulogy at his funeral, Albom determines to know this Man of God better so he can do the task well. Over the course of eight years, he spends time learning about the Reb's life and faith which in turn makes him re-evaluate his own. As part of a way of giving back to his adopted hometown of Detroit, he creates a fund to help out organizations that …
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Kelly Klepfer ()
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Member Since: Feb 11, 2009
Last Login: Jun 8, 2012 02:25 AM UTC
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Starred Review. Albom delivers a command audio performance. He brings his two clergymen-protagonists-an elderly rabbi from Albom's home synagogue and an African-American pastor leading a ministry to Detroit's homeless population-to vivid life and conveys their messages of faith with sensitivity and respect. The audio's most memorable moments feature the humility-and eccentricity-of the two spiritual leaders who, despite their deep religious commitment, refuse to be placed on a pedestal. From the ail-ing Jewish leader breaking out into whimsical songs in the middle of his grueling medical treatments and his Christian counterpart savoring the joys of barbecuing, Albom's characterizations brim with humor and compassion. A Hyperion hardcover.--This text refers to the Audio CD edition.
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Details

ISBN-10: 0786868724
ISBN-13: 978-0786868728
Author: Mitch Albom
Genre: Religion & Spirituality
Publisher: Hyperion
Date Published: September 29, 2009
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