|
Movies Books Music Food Tv Shows Technology Politics Video Games Parenting Fashion Green Living more >

Lunch » Tags » Books » Reviews » Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books » User review

Not bad, but I was not overly excited to continue reading. I had problems with the author.

  • Jul 28, 2006
  • by
Rating:
+1
"Reading Lolita in Tehran" is an account of the education of a select group of women in Iran during the Islamic revolution. It is certainly interesting to see the changes in the culture as the extremist regime comes to power and forces the women to "lose themselves" to the dominant culture. These women start to wear the veil and give up the freedoms and the things that make them individuals.

This book is interesting with respect to women's rights, middle eastern culture, and some historical content. One thing that I find slightly annoying with the author is the fact that she was educated in the western world and then moves back to Iran and presents a view and opinion of superiority over the Islamic culture; however, she does a fair job of showing how many of the women were ready to fulfill their societal roles (no matter how insignificant or unfulfilling these roles may be in western society).

I also believe that she is so preoccupied by writing this story to prove that she is an individual and not just another insignificant member of the Iranian culture and the men were not able to break her. Often times it feels like this book is trying to reinforce how wonderful the author is because she was able to go back and have a critical outside opinion about the Islamic regime when in fact she displays a bias so large that it ridiculous.

This book is not bad, but maybe I was just a little too critical about the author while reading the text. If you are interested in women's rights, middle-eastern culture, or Russian literature, then this book will be right up your alley.

What did you think of this review?

Helpful
0
Thought-Provoking
0
Fun to Read
0
Well-Organized
0
Post a Comment
More Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Me... reviews
review by . July 06, 2010
When I first started Azar Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran, I was excited to discover for myself what this #1 New York Times Bestseller was all about, and as a big fan of memiors, the "Memoir in Books" intrigued me.  However, never having read Nabokov's Lolitia, which is referred to in the first of four sections, I didn't immediately connect with the book.  I even wondered whether I should continue reading or search for something new, but I was incredibly glad …
Quick Tip by . July 06, 2010
interesting look into a different culture
Quick Tip by . June 10, 2010
Interesting perspective from a different cultural standpoint.
Quick Tip by . December 02, 2009
Another book that deserved all the popularity and praise. A rare glimpse into the other side of Tehran -- the bohemians, feminists, etc.
review by . April 23, 2009
"Reading Lolita in Tehran" is an account of the education of a select group of women in Iran during the Islamic revolution. It is certainly interesting to see the changes in the culture as the extremist regime comes to power and forces the women to "lose themselves" to the dominant culture. These women start to wear the veil and give up the freedoms and the things that make them individuals.      This book is interesting with respect to women's rights, middle eastern culture, …
review by . April 12, 2009
Reading Lolita in Tehran" (RLT) is a Persian variation on "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich." Both are about surviving cruel, arbitrary tyrants.     There was a brilliant essay on RLT in the July 19, 2004 "Washington Post" entitled "Sorry, Wrong Chador." At the time, Nafisi's book had not even been translated into Persian, but Iranians still had opinions about it:     "The problem, several Iranians said in interviews, is that Nafisi left Tehran seven …
review by . November 29, 2008
Nafisi's memoir is a mixed bag. Her device--using the great novels she has studied and taught throughout her career as pegs for a memoir about modern Iran--is effective, but her professorship constantly gets in the way. She is bent on forcing her students and readers to see novels her way and to see her world through her lens. That said, she also offers a great deal of insight on what it means to live under the Islamic dictatorship that is post-revolutionary Iran, and many of her quotes from literature …
review by . September 12, 2006
"Reading Lolita in Tehran" (RLT) is a Persian variation on "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich." Both are about surviving cruel, arbitrary tyrants.    There was a brilliant essay on RLT in the July 19, 2004 "Washington Post" entitled "Sorry, Wrong Chador." At the time, Nafisi's book had not even been translated into Persian, but Iranians still had opinions about it:    "The problem, several Iranians said in interviews, is that Nafisi left Tehran seven …
review by . September 02, 2006
"Reading Lolita in Tehran" (RLT) is a Persian variation on "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich." Both are about surviving cruel, arbitrary tyrants.    There was a brilliant essay on RLT in the July 19, 2004 "Washington Post" entitled "Sorry, Wrong Chador." At the time, Nafisi's book had not even been translated into Persian, but Iranians still had opinions about it:    "The problem, several Iranians said in interviews, is that Nafisi left Tehran seven …
About the reviewer

Ranked #133
Thanks for viewing my profile! I am a college administrator that currently works in housing a private university. The main purpose of my job (other than providing a safe and comfortable living environment … more
Consider the Source

Use Trust Points to see how much you can rely on this review.

You
plantsandbooks
Your ratings:
rate more to improve this
About this book

Wiki

An inspired blend of memoir and literary criticism,Reading Lolita in Tehranis a moving testament to the power of art and its ability to change and improve people's lives. In 1995, after resigning from her job as a professor at a university in Tehran due to repressive policies, Azar Nafisi invited seven of her best female students to attend a weekly study of great Western literature in her home. Since the books they read were officially banned by the government, the women were forced to meet in secret, often sharing photocopied pages of the illegal novels. For two years they met to talk, share, and "shed their mandatory veils and robes and burst into color." Though most of the women were shy and intimidated at first, they soon became emboldened by the forum and used the meetings as a springboard for debating the social, cultural, and political realities of living under strict Islamic rule. They discussed their harassment at the hands of "morality guards," the daily indignities of living under the Ayatollah Khomeini's regime, the effects of the Iran-Iraq war in the 1980s, love, marriage, and life in general, giving readers a rare inside look at revolutionary Iran. The books were always the primary focus, however, and they became "essential to our lives: they were not a luxury but a necessity," she writes.

 

Threaded into the memoir are trenchant discussions of the work of Vladimir Nabokov, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jane Austen, and other ...

view wiki

Tags

Details

ISBN-10: 081297106X
ISBN-13: 978-0812971064
Author: Azar Nafisi
Genre: Religion & Spirituality
Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks
© 2014 Lunch.com, LLC All Rights Reserved
Lunch.com - Relevant reviews by real people.
()
This is you!
Ranked #
Last login
Member since
reviews
comments
ratings
questions
compliments
lists