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The Horse and His Boy

The third book in C.S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia

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A Fable From a Fantasy Land.

  • Feb 9, 2006
Rating:
+3
THE HORSE AND HIS BOY is the 5th book in "The Chronicles of Narnia." Out of the whole series, this book comes off as being the weakest because there is very little connecting it to the other books.

THE HORSE AND HIS BOY tells the story of Shasta and a horse called Bree. Shasta is a poor boy raised by a cruel fisherman. He longs to explore the world around him, but is forbidden. One day a great lord of Calormene chances upon Shasta's abode. Shasta overhears his adoptive father and the lord barter over the price that Shasta will be sold as a slave. Shasta doesn't want to be a slave and longingly speaks to the horse, wishing that it could talk. Surprisingly, the horse can talk. Shasta learns that the horse is named Bree and is a talking horse from Narnia that was captured and enslaved many years ago as a youth. The horse is planning to escape to Narnia and asks Shasta to join him. Together, they begin the long journey to the "free" land of Narnia.

Along the way, they have encounters with lions, are joined by Aravis Tarkheena and her talking horse Hwin (who are fleeing from Aravis' forced marriage), meet King Edmund and Queen Susan of Narnia, and transverse the wide desert that separates Calormene from the other "free" countries of the world.

As in all the Chronicles, Lewis has a lot to say about Christianity, faith, and God. His observations that are made here are just as deep as some of the ones made in THE SILVER CHAIR.

However, THE HORSE AND HIS BOY really is the odd-book in "The Chronicles." Other than a brief mention of this story in THE SILVER CHAIR, and the appearances of Aslan, Edmund, Susan, and Lucy, there is very little continuity with this book and the rest of the Chronicles. That's not a bad thing, but it does make THE HORSE AND HIS BOY the odd book of the series. Had Lewis written a few more stories like THE HORSE AND HIS BOY, then it wouldn't seem quite as odd.

I enjoyed reading THE HORSE AND HIS BOY and it has a lot to offer. Most of it takes place in Calormene, so the whole flavor of the story has a different feel. Nevertheless, it's still a good story that has a lot of great moral truths to relay. It's just my least favorite of all "The Chronicles of Narnia."

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More The Horse and His Boy reviews
review by . October 08, 2010
THE HORSE AND HIS BOY is the 5th book in "The Chronicles of Narnia." Out of the whole series, this book comes off as being the weakest because there is very little connecting it to the other books. THE HORSE AND HIS BOY tells the story of Shasta and a horse called Bree. Shasta is a poor boy raised by a cruel fisherman. He longs to explore the world around him, but is forbidden. One day a great lord of Calormene chances upon Shasta's abode. Shasta overhears his adoptive father and the lord barter …
Quick Tip by . October 08, 2010
This is really the fifth of the Chronicles of Narnia.
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Grade 4-7-British narrator Alex Jennings does a smashing job with C. S. Lewis' delightful classic (HarperCollins Children's, 1994), the third story in the Narnia series. The tale begins with a poor slave boy named Shasta escaping from his adopted fisherman father who plans to sell him to a brutish stranger. A dignified talking war horse named Bree helps Shasta flee. Jennings plays Shasta with refreshing gentleness-listeners get a sense of the boy's sensitivity and fear as he embarks on the adventure of his life. The talented narrator plays Bree with the right amount of dignity and haughtiness. This horse amuses with his witty observations about human behavior, and sense of equine superiority. The horse and his boy hope to travel north to Narnia, and encounter numerous adventures and strange characters, all beautifully portrayed by Jennings. The most memorable supporting characters are another escaped child, a tough girl named Aravis, and her talking mare called Hwin. Jennings brings these two adventure seekers to life with his crystal clear narration. Thanks to his skills as a storyteller, the action moves rapidly from one exciting episode to the next. Evocative music plays at the beginning and end of each side of the tape. This presentation will enchant young listeners and encourage them to read the other titles in the series. It is helpful for students to have read The Magician's Nephew and The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe before enjoying this, but The...
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ISBN-10: 0064471063
ISBN-13: 978-0064471060
Author: C. S. Lewis
Publisher: HarperCollins

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