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The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Volume One

Volume I of Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill's graphic novel that brings together literary characters from different classics.

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Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill stand on the shoulders of the giants who preceded them!

  • May 29, 2010
  • by
Rating:
+5

THE LEAGUE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN, VOL 1 is a graphic novel. It is most assuredly not a comic book intended for children. Rather it is solid proof that mainstream comic books can be combined with exciting, imaginative adventure and story-telling, illustrated with serious, skilled artwork that merits close examination in each and every panel aimed at serious adult readers with eclectic tastes in classic literature. THE LEAGUE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN, VOL1 is at once a pastiche and a tribute to the skills of an extraordinary, lengthy and almost bewildering list of adventure, mystery and horror writers of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

 

Under order from the mysterious "M", the director of MI5, Britain's intelligence service, Campion Bond has recruited a team of adventurers and spies best known for their ability to get the job done in the face of daunting opposition and insurmountable obstacles. The team consists of Mina Murray, Allan Quatermain, Captain Nemo, Henry Jekyll, Edward Hyde and HG Well's invisible man, Hawley Griffin. Their task, as they understand it, is to locate and recover a container of the anti-gravity compound, Cavorite, before the nefarious Dr Fu Manchu can use it to launch an airship and attack the city of London. But, all is never as it seems, and as challenging as this assignment is, it represents only the beginning of the horrors and the difficulties that Mina Murray and her League of Extraordinary Gentlemen will face in their race to save Victorian London from devastating destruction.

 

Moore's borrowed cast of characters leaps off the page and into life under the skilled artistry of Kevin O'Neill. But alert readers will quickly discover that it doesn't end with this short list of main players and will delight in scavenging for even the most fleeting references to an almost endless list of literary luminaries - Sherlock and Mycroft Holmes, Dorian Gray, James Moriarty and Sebastian Moran, Auguste Dupin, Selwyn Cavor, Jack the Ripper, Jack Harkaway, Ishmael, Samuel Ferguson, the Artful Dodger ... the list just goes on and on!

 

Be advised. Readers who consider themselves to be faint of heart should know that Kevin O'Neill has given himself full permission to display violence, fighting, bloodletting and death in the most graphic fashion. But this is far from a criticism, it is only a caution in the full understanding that some potential readers will simply not enjoy the degree to which O'Neill has visually let loose the free flow of blood and guts. Thankfully, I am not on that list and can say that I enjoyed every single word and every single illustration immensely. I'm only sorry to realize that there are only two volumes left in the series which I will be purchasing just as soon as I finish this review.

 

Highly recommended.

 

Paul Weiss

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August 28, 2010
Great review. Just so you know, after Vol 2 and Black Dossier, Century is being published right now!
August 28, 2010
Thanks, I've read and reviewed Vol 2 but I'm looking forward to the other two in the very near future.
 
May 31, 2010
Not really sci-fi, but oh well. Nicely done, Paul. Moore is one of my favorite writers in the medium.
 
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More The League of Extraordinary Ge... reviews
review by . October 24, 2010
For those who think that reading comic books are a waste of time and that graphic novels aren't anywhere near real literature, this is one comic you should check out and which maybe even change your mind. The illustrations are amazing, capturing the essence of the time period in which the story takes place. The story is written by the great Alan Moore (what more needs to be said), so the plot is intense; the action fierce; and the characters fully developed. That in itself is enough to purchase …
Quick Tip by . December 18, 2010
Solid proof that mainstream comic books can be combined with exciting, imaginative adventure and story-telling, illustrated with serious, skilled artwork.
review by . October 14, 2010
For those who think that reading comic books are a waste of time and that graphic novels aren't anywhere near real literature, this is one comic you should check out and which maybe even change your mind. The illustrations are amazing, capturing the essence of the time period in which the story takes place. The story is written by the great Alan Moore (what more needs to be said), so the plot is intense; the action fierce; and the characters fully developed. That in itself is enough to purchase …
review by . March 16, 2008
Great literary characters have a tendency to outlive their mortal creators, by finding second and third lives in cultures far removed from those which created them. Here, in the first volume of a collection of graphic novels, a quintet of Victorian-era protagonists are enjoyably thrust into the late-20th-century medium of the comic book.    It is 1898. Mina Murray, heroine of "Dracula" with her maiden name reassumed, is charged to assemble a team of social miscreants whose skills …
review by . July 22, 2003
The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is an utterly delightful book. In it, writer Alan Moore assembles a superhero team of a completely different sort, drawing on British literary figures of the late 1800s. Writing in a style reminiscent of that era, Moore has crafted a superb story that stands with the classics of adventure, science fiction and a bit of the grotesque.Some people might be completely lost after reading pages where the only text is dialogue in Arabic, Chinese or French -- but the …
review by . February 17, 2003
For those who think that reading comic books are a waste of time and that graphic novels aren't anywhere near real literature, this is one comic you should check out and which maybe even change your mind. The illustrations are amazing, capturing the essence of the time period in which the story takes place. The story is written by the great Alan Moore (what more needs to be said), so the plot is intense; the action fierce; and the characters fully developed. That in itself is enough to purchase …
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Paul Weiss ()
Ranked #16
   A modern day dilettante with widely varied eclectic interests. A dabbler in muchbut grandmaster of none - wilderness camping in all four seasons, hiking, canoeing, world travel,philately, … more
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Wiki

(from Wikipedia)
The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is a comic book series written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Kevin O'Neill, published beginning in 1999. The series spans two six-issue limited series and a graphic novel from the America's Best Comics imprint of Wildstorm/DC, and a third miniseries published by Top Shelf and Knockabout Comics. According to Moore, the concept behind the series was initially a "Justice League of Victorian England" but quickly grew into an opportunity to merge all works of fiction into one world. Says Moore: "The planet of the imagination is as old as we are. It has been humanity's constant companion with all of its fictional locations, like Mount Olympus and the gods, and since we first came down from the trees, basically. It seems very important, otherwise, we wouldn't have it." Moore and O'Neill have revealed that they plan to map out many different eras in the League series with Allan Quatermain and Mina Murray being the two constants.
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Details

Author: Alan Moore, Kevin O'Neill
Genre: Comics & Graphic Novels, Historical Fantasy, Steampunk, Alternative Histories
Publisher: DC Comics, Wildstorm, America's Best Comics (ABC)
Date Published: March 1999 - September 2000
Format: Graphic Novel
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