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Lunch » Tags » Books » Reviews » The Murder of King Tut: The Plot to Kill the Child King - A Nonfiction Thriller » User review

The Murder of King Tut: The Plot to Kill the Child

A book by James Patterson and Martin Dugard

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Fun Read But Leaves You Wanting More

  • Mar 29, 2010
Rating:
+3
I am not a fan of James Patterson, which probably comes as a bit of a shock. While I have read several of his books, I am not what you would call a "fan." However, as I was perusing the new books at the library, I came across The Murder of King Tut: The Plot to Kill the Child King by James Patterson and Martin Dugard, a "nonfiction thriller." I decided that, as nonfiction, it may provide more substance than I was accustomed from the author. While there seems to be more research with this book, it falls within the normal Patterson writing pattern; short chapters, large type, and a quick read. In fact, even though the book is 332 pages, one can finish the book in a couple of days.

Jumping between the present, the 1900's, and the time of the Pharaoh's, Patterson and Dugard tell the story of Howard Carter, the man who discovered King Tut's final resting place, King Tut, and Patterson's decision to write the story and provide his hypothesis on the fate of Tut. While this is a work of nonfiction, Patterson and Dugard take liberties with Tut, in order, I believe, to make the story flow and read like a detective novel. This works, as they make this a compelling story. For those unfamiliar with Egyptology, Patterson and Dugard provide enough background to allow the reader to enjoy the rich ancient Egyptian civilization and the "fever" that gripped Howard Carter on his search for the elusive tomb of King Tut. As the reader moves between the centuries, Patterson and Dugard provide the background for what, they believe, is the murder of the Child King and the subsequent removal of his name from the list of Pharaoh's.

The Murder of King Tut: The Plot to Kill the Child King is not, in my opinion, to be held up as the definitive standard on the fate of King Tut. While Patterson and Dugard have created an exciting read, the lack of notes or a bibliography surprised me. I expected a few pages on the research they performed to create this book, especially since Patterson himself breathlessly describes his discovery to his wife, publisher, and the reader. Perhaps we are to overlook this little detail, as it may simply detract from the "thriller" aspect of the book. While I enjoyed the time spent in ancient Egypt and with Howard Carter, as he worked to discover the tomb, it was the detours into present day, spent with James Patterson, that seemed to slow the narrative. In those sections, we are treated to Patterson explaining his writing style, the number of unfinished manuscripts on his desk (numbering about 24, I believe), and his view from his office window. If he wishes to inform the reader of these items, another work, such as has been done by Larry McMurtry (Books, for example), may be in order. Those two criticisms aside, this is a highly entertaining, though light, read. A good way to spend a day, but The Murder of King Tut: The Plot to Kill the Child King will not remain with you after you have finished the last page.

Disclosure:
Obtained from: Library
Payment: Borrowed

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More The Murder of King Tut: The Pl... reviews
review by . December 07, 2009
Uber-popular adventure/mystery author Patterson teams up with popular nonfiction author Dugard for this no-reason-for-existence "thriller" about how Egyptian Pharaoh Tut died. While billed as "nonfiction" there are no footnotes or bibliography to source any of the facts, and any facts used in the making of this story are buried in invented dialog and first-person description and thought.     The book moves forward along three parallel tracks - the Egyptian history of Tut, the …
review by . June 28, 2010
James Patterson tells us with some enthusiasm, because this book is important to him, that the volume contains three stories: his own tale of how he wrote his history, the adventure of the eccentric Howard Carter who discovered King Tut’s grave, and the life of King Tut and his death. Patterson states that he is certain that Tut was murdered and promises to reveal the murderer.               He writes that he will tell us the truth. …
Quick Tip by . June 28, 2010
history at is best --a good way to be walked thru the pages
review by . June 28, 2010
James Patterson tells us with some enthusiasm, because this book is important to him, that the volume contains three stories: his own tale of how he wrote his history, the adventure of the eccentric Howard Carter who discovered King Tut's grave, and the life of King Tut and his death. Patterson states that he is certain that Tut was murdered and promises to reveal the murderer.     He writes that he will tell us the truth. "It's nothing new for histories to be speculative, but …
review by . October 02, 2009
I am not a nofiction reader. Matter of fact I make a conscience effort NOT to read non-fiction because it's so darn BORING! I concede that most non-fiction books are written to educate and NOT to entertain. I read for entertainment only, so when I do pick a non-fiction book I've done my homework and have tried to pick the "right" one. There were also two other factors in me picking this book. I read my first James Patterson book, Alex Cross's Trial, a few weeks back and LOVED it, and I love historical-fiction …
About the reviewer
Gregg Eldred ()
Ranked #75
It never ceases to amaze me how many doors have opened up for me since I started reviewing the books I read. Publishers now send me free books to read and review. Authors contact me. Kind folks at Lunch … more
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About this book

Wiki

"[The Murder of King Tut]effectively portray the exotic ancient world, including colorful insights into Tut's brief reign." (Bookpage)
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Details

ISBN-10: 0316034045
ISBN-13: 978-0316034043
Author: James Patterson, Martin Dugard
Genre: History
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
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