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The Saudis (Signet)

A book by Sandra Mackey

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Informative and intriguing look into Saudi Arabian life.

  • Jan 25, 2000
Rating:
+3
This is a good introductary or pulp nonfiction book, if such a thing exists. It would be a typical best-seller. What this book does, however, is introduce readers and help them to understand the complexities of Saudi Arabian politics, economics and society at large. Sandra Mackey gives fine minute details of how women are treated, the norms of culture and traditions and the country's most powerful and lucrative export: oil. In terms of global economy -- especially for the United States -- a lot of power is tied to the actions of the Saudi government. The book explains very successfully the purpose of the Arabian-American Oil Company (ARAMCO), the Committee for the Protection of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice, the Arabian's love of power and materialism, the lifestyle of the Bedouins, the Hajj, all the way through to the purpose (socially) to the assumed sexually active Hareems. The book is packed with useful information for anyone with a novice interest in the Middle East and Saudia Arabia specifically.The author also gives a very explict and colorful portrait of the Saudi's love of camel racing. The Saudis is a good source book. However, some of the provided information ia a little out of date.It is still a good, insightful read. I would recommend Sandra Mackey's other books: The Iranians and Lebanon: Death of a Nation.

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More The Saudis (Signet) reviews
review by . May 12, 2013
This is a good introductary or pulp nonfiction book, if such a thing exists. It would be a typical best-seller. What this book does, however, is introduce readers and help them to understand the complexities of Saudi Arabian politics, economics and society at large. Sandra Mackey gives fine minute details of how women are treated, the norms of culture and traditions and the country's most powerful and lucrative export: oil. In terms of global economy -- especially for the United States -- a …
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Christian Engler ()
Ranked #652
Not much to say; my info section and likes pretty much says it all. Cheers.
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About this book

Wiki

For four years beginning in 1978, Mackey lived a double life: as a journalist and professional she objectively observed and analyzed the changes transforming Saudi Arabia; as an expatriate American she was exasperated by the inefficiences and personal inconveniences endemic to that rapidly changing society. Her book outlines the impact of the oil boom on a conservative society, filling in background on the nature of Islam and traditional Arab life. Although fond of the country, she shows little empathy, concluding that Saudi Arabia suffers as "a people who have lost their way, whose heritage proved unequal to the demands of modernization, whose leaders became corrupt, whose idols floundered . . . ." Sarcasm and intolerance undermine her factual reporting, and make this a volume that libraries can pass up.Elizabeth R. Hayford, President, Assoc. Colls. of the Midwest, Chicago
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc.--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Details

ISBN-10: 0451170512
ISBN-13: 978-0451170514
Author: Sandra Mackey
Publisher: Signet

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