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Short, but it has a lot to say

  • Nov 14, 2013
Rating:
+4
The Skinny On Networking: Maximizing the Power of Numbers, Jim Randel, 2010, ISBN 9780984441815

This is another in a series of simple, but not simplistic, books that teach a "large" subject very painlessly. This one is all about networking.

Billy is a high school history teacher. He would like to be a college music teacher, but such vacancies are few and far between. Randel, the narrator, tells Billy to start by asking his network, like friends and family, if they can help. Maybe someone knows someone who knows someone. He shouldn't assume that they already know about his desire to be a college music teacher; he has to tell them, specifically. If he sends an email, he should be very careful about who gets it. Don't just send it to everyone on your e-mail list.

If that doesn't fulfill the request, expand your horizons. For instance, dust off your college yearbook, and start looking up old classmates. Cold calling is never fun, but it is an essential part of networking. The book talks about connectors, those who seem to know people in many different "groups." If you come in contact with such a person, becoming acquaintances or friends with them is a very good idea. Think of social capital as a form of karma; you can never have too much of it. Try very hard to do things for other people (increasing your social capital supply) before you ask for things from other people (reducing your social capital supply).

Billy's wife, Beth, is a lawyer who would like to be partner. She knows that it involves bringing in more clients, but she is uncomfortable asking total strangers for their business. Randel suggests that she join business and professional groups that will put her in the company of people who may need her services in the future. Networking is not supposed to be quick or easy, so don't get discouraged if "it" doesn't happen very quickly.

This is another excellent book that is made for busy people. The idea is to distill the major points from many books on a subject, like networking, into an easy to read format that still has a lot to say. Along with the rest of the series, this is very highly recommended.

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More The Skinny on Networking: Maxi... reviews
review by . December 20, 2010
The Skinny On Networking is a very useful book. This book is very easy to read. It is filled with stick drawings that are fun to look at. Jim Randel introduces the idea of a connector. A connector is a person with a broad network of people. I do not know any connector personally, but I strive to be one in my own life. Another valuable thing I learned is to reach outside of my comfort zone by trying to meet people from different fields when I am networking. I am going to try to do more of this. I …
review by . November 13, 2010
Networking is not one of the easiest things for me... or so I thought. After reading THE SKINNY ON Networking by Jim Randel I thought about that networking is something I do everyday without even thinking about it. It doesn't have to be an official "networking" event for you to network. It can be meeting people at a public place and where the conversation leads. It can also be the way you utilize the internet and social networking sites.    We always are talking, but the book …
review by . December 19, 2010
The Skinny On Networking is a very useful book. This book is very easy to read. It is filled with stick drawings that are fun to look at. Jim Randel introduces the idea of a connector. A connector is a person with a broad network of people. I do not know any connector personally, but I strive to be one in my own life. Another valuable thing I learned is to reach outside of my comfort zone by trying to meet people from different fields when I am networking. I am going to try to do more of this. I …
About the reviewer
Paul Lappen ()
Ranked #68
I am in my early 50s, single and live in Connecticut. I am a lifelong very, very avid reader and am a freelance book reviewer with my ownblog (http://www.deadtreesreview.blogspot.com). Please visit. It … more
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"It's my angry belief that most self-help and education book writers get paid by the word. Three and four hundred page books that could have been done better in 50 pages. Not so with "The Skinny On" series. These books kick rears and take names. Using entertaining writing, stick figure drawings and a comic book style layout, they use simple stories to quickly convey valuable information. Highly recommended. Author Jim Randel has created one of the best, most interesting series I've seen in a very long time." --Mercury News. The Silicon Valley Newspaper

"Who would have thought a book with stick-people illustrations could be so weighty? This one caught me off guard - tons of substance in a fun-filled one-hour read. I am very happy that someone persuaded me to read this book!" --Mike Goss, Managing Director, Bain Capital
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ISBN-10: 0984441816
ISBN-13: 978-0984441815
Author: Jim Randel
Publisher: Rand Media Co

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