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Theodore Rex

A book by Edmund Morris

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Very worthy effort that leaves me wanting more, not less,

  • Oct 11, 2008
  • by
Rating:
+3
Don't misunderstand, this was a very good book, but it left me a little flat, because it wasn't--long enough. I know, 772 pages is plenty long, but 220 pages of that are notes and index.

The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt (Modern Library Paperbacks) by the same author, covering the years of his life up to the presidency, seemed to complete a more detailed portrait of that phase of TR's life. This book seemed to brush over the eight presidential years in watercolor fashion, much like the jacket portrait of Teddy at repose in soft focus.

Still, this is a very worthy effort that leaves me wanting more, not less, about this amazing "dynamogenic" man who as President just devoured the landscape around him (literally and figuratively), and seldom stood at repose in soft focus.

It is not a wonder that Ronald Reagan found Roosevelt his model for governing, and it is clear that after Lincoln and Washington, Roosevelt must stand as the President guiding his country through the most perilous times with the strongest hand.

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More Theodore Rex reviews
review by . June 04, 2003
Morris' second book of the trilogy on Theodore Roosevelt (TR) is a most enjoyable read. This book covers TR's White House years and gives great insight into one of Americas greatest presidents and most influential men of the twentieth century. Morris gives you an in depth but not dry look at what TR accomplished in his two terms. He created the Dept. of Interior and protected more land for posterity than any other president. He created the Food and Drug Administration after reading a book written …
review by . July 11, 2002
I recently re-read two biographies. The other is McCullough's biography of John Adams. However greatly their two subjects differ, both are written with the narrative skills of a novelist, the discipline of a consummate historian, and an objectivity which enables the reader to absorb and digest the abundance of information without manipulation by the biographer. Whereas McCullough examines Adams' entire life (1735-1826), Morris limits his attention almost entirely to a period extending from 1901 …
review by . July 11, 2002
I recently re-read two biographies. The other is McCullough's biography of John Adams. However greatly their two subjects differ, both are written with the narrative skills of a novelist, the discipline of a consummate historian, and an objectivity which enables the reader to absorb and digest the abundance of information without manipulation by the biographer. Whereas McCullough examines Adams' entire life (1735-1826), Morris limits his attention almost entirely to a period extending from 1901 …
review by . January 12, 2002
This second volume of the biography of Theodore Roosevelt has been a long time coming, but it has been worth the wait! The author has not allowed the controversy over his biography of Ronald Reagan to adversely affect his ability to do excellent and extensive research, and then put it all together into one neat package. This is quite readable and very informative; it almost makes you feel that you are experiencing history as it is being made. Roosevelt's presidency was an exciting time in our country's …
About the reviewer
Todd Stockslager ()
Ranked #38
I love reading and writing about what I have read, making the connections and marking the comparisons and contrasts. God has given man the amazing power to invent language and the means to record it which … more
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About this book

Wiki

In this lively biography, Edmund Morris returns to the gifted, energetic, and thoroughly controversial man whom the novelist Henry James called "King Theodore." In his two terms as president of the United States, Roosevelt forged an American empire, and he behaved as if it was his destiny. In this sequel to his Pulitzer Prize-winning biographyThe Rise of Theodore Roosevelt, Morris charts Roosevelt's accomplishments: the acquisition of the Panama Canal and the Philippines, the creation of national parks and monuments, and more. "Collaring Capital and Labor in either hand," Morris writes, Roosevelt made few friends, but he usually got what he wanted--and earned an enduring place in history.

Morris combines a fine command of the era's big issues with an appreciation for the daily minutiae involved in governing a nation. Less controversially inventive, but no less readable, than the Ronald Reagan biography Dutch, Theodore Rex gives readers new reason both to admire and fault an American phenomenon. --Gregory McNamee

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Details

ISBN-10: 0394555090
ISBN-13: 978-0394555096
Author: Edmund Morris
Genre: Biographies & Memoirs
Publisher: Random House
First to Review

"Excellent biography"
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