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Lunch » Tags » Book » Reviews » Vipers' Tangle (The Loyola Classics Series) » User review

A razor-cutting literary analysis that gets to the heart of the matter.

  • May 9, 2013
  • by
Rating:
+5
The day-to-day struggles of human existence are quite difficult for many people, and for others, they are a marvelling pleasure, and why is that? What sets one group of humanity apart from the other whereby their only connection is the gossamer thread of humanism? It is faith in Jesus Christ and how that faith is utilized in the molding and or sculpting of humanism to hopeful, healthy perfection. Yet, too, what are the molding tools that are used in the vast dichotomy of that living? The universal tool is love and sacrifice, and that is a no-holds-bar truth which is ardently championed by the Holy Catholic Church. But there are many impediments and or blockages of our own making, because we either fail or simply choose not to see the universality of that global truth, for in the acknowledging of that, it means giving up an element of one's vital self to it, and that is where we are constantly at odds; it is frightening; it requires too much; it is overwhelming; it is too good to be true, et cetera, et cetera. Sometimes we learn that lesson early in life, and sometimes we learn in the very end. It does not matter at what age one accepts that truth, as long as one does, and in the novel Viber's Tangle, the character Louis accepts it before he meets his Father, a gift from the Mysterious, a humble yet grateful yes in return. There are so many stumbling blocks that prevent people from being genuine religious carriers of faith, and for Monsieur Louis, it is greed and the evolution of it from being one of a good, practical necessity into a self-serving tactical weapon by which to negatively dominate over the lives of others; he could not see beyond his own creation and perception-the viper's tangle that surrounded his heart and soul-skewering the reality of the more careful loving domination that had easy attention on him all the while but which he chose to coldly mock and ignore, and as such, his evolvement through career and family was nothing more but an appendage to a miserable life of his own free will and making. And Love, who is Christ Jesus, is not a word or simply an experience. He is a fact. And Louis's conversion to that truth where he sees that the Word and the Man are not separated but are in actuality one-in-the-same, is a moving reading experience. In the excellent introduction by Robert Coles, he makes mention that the author wanted the reader to feel pity and be moved by the character's predicament, which is not so easy, because his deplorableness is easier to latch on to. Francois Mauriac makes it very easy for his literary creation to be despised. But upon reading the concise language and deft plotting, there is an evolution that takes place from dislike, to pity, to hope, to change, to cheering, to Love. And in the end, is that not all to whom we desire to return to?
A razor-cutting literary analysis that gets to the heart of the matter.

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More Vipers' Tangle (The Loyola Cla... reviews
review by . October 05, 2006
The day-to-day struggles of human existence are quite difficult for many people, and for others, they are a marvelling pleasure, and why is that? What sets one group of humanity apart from the other whereby their only connection is the gossamer thread of humanism? It is faith in Jesus Christ and how that faith is utilized in the molding and or sculpting of humanism to hopeful, healthy perfection. Yet, too, what are the molding tools that are used in the vast dichotomy of that living? The universal …
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This audio edition of the 1932 novel is read in a straightforward fashion by Geoffrey Howard. An old man reflects on a life without love, without letting one's guard down even to one's family. His life's work seems to have been evading love. He has plotted to disinherit his wife and children from his considerable fortune. He explains the events and thoughts that led him to such a narrow, spiteful life in a series of letters to his wife, which are never shared with her. Mauriac creates Louis as a miserable old miser devoured by bitterness. In a quest to untangle the roots of his wretchedness, Louis begins writing his life story. As he tries to explain and to justify himself, his introspection leads him to see beyond his bitterness to a more profound, deeper understanding. Make no mistakes, there is no happy ending here. Winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1952, Mauriac develops a character from the inside out, so to speak. The listener is able to move into Louis's mind, to feel and understand his motivation. The reading has little drama, as if the reader is plowing through pages of dictation. But, all in all, it rather suits the story. This is not likely to be popular with the average patron wanting recreational listening. Recommended for academic collections and large public libraries wanting to have a comprehensive audio collection.ANancy Paul, Brandon
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.--This text refers to theAudio Cassetteedition.
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ISBN-10: 0829422110
ISBN-13: 978-0829422115
Author: Francois Mauriac
Publisher: Loyola Press

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