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2011 Libyan Protests

A series of protests and confrontations occurring in the North African state of Libya against the Government of Libya and its de facto leader Muammar al-Gaddafi.

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To be or Not to be

  • Apr 2, 2011
Rating:
+1
Without electricity, I'm lost. Truly. I almost couldn't get anything done. Think about it, how dependent we are on it. This saturday morning, my area had a shutdown of power in order to boost up more power, we were told. The blackout? Some 12 hours. So, currently my laptop has only about 2 hours left, although I've another netbook which can provide some 10 more hours of entertainment and connections. Otherwise, the only thing that's making noise today is the radio (battery powered, remember what I said in my radio review? It comes handy especially today!). TV off, DVD off, refrigerator off, kettle off, microwave off, cellphone off (as soon as battery runs out)... now you get the drift! Even the hot water is off! Darn it, I can't even take a decent shower and get out of the house! Oh, the generator is providing power to the lifts, so I reckon most are out of the house by now!


What's got this to do with the Libyan Protests? Well, if they are depending on social media to coordinate the protests and they are out of power (as in electricity), then they are also out of luck. Well, that's history now, as with the Egyptian protests. What is more interesting is the fact that a country as advanced and rich as Japan also has had its run out where power is concerned. The earthquake on 3/11 had plenty of people without power (aka electricity) for a period of time and for those most affected, not only out of power but also food! The problem is not because the country is without, but rather, problem with distribution (due to the fear of radiation) meant things cannot get where it's most needed.


So, what did all this boil down to? Electric power! The reason why the protests in Africa and Middle East are rampant is because of rising prices and inflation. Higher food prices is a result of partly the poor weather and the escalating oil prices. These 2 factors are self-fulfilling. Bad weather are result of global warming, which in turn is the result of pollution, which is caused by our dependence on oil and carbon dioxide from burning of petroleum. Now, it becomes a cycle which propels even higher prices as oil causes bad weather and high food prices and then higher oil prices, etc...


It's been said whoever control energy controls the world. Is it about liberty that everyone is fighting for? Technically, no. It is the working of economics that's controlling human behaviors. That's why this review is under Business Matters and not on Earth Watch. People are protesting because they cannot cope with their finances. Throughout history, there are certain levels of repression citizens were able to put up with singularly until each and everyone has got it up to the neck. Only until then and there that massive voices began to be heard across the masses. 

In Libya, the government has been in power for some decades. No one has got the nerves to do anything about it. This year, with the success of the Egyptian government being overthrown, things took a turn for the Libyan too. Better or worse? It's yet to be seen. They however feel it is time. What is pertinent now is not Libya, rather, which other citizens of the world, as a group, would think it is time too! We are at a time when change is in the offing, my question is, are the governments in the world ready to cope? Are the international finances ready for a shift in power? And, most importantly, is each and everyone of us ready for an uncertain future?

Are you ready for your role in society? If so, what is your role?

 



P.S. : It's also been said that if the house of finances is in order, then everything else will be in order too...
To be or Not to be To be or Not to be

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April 02, 2011
nice one, Sharrie! it's good thing my heart is a huge nuclear reactor of awesome ness LOL!!
April 02, 2011
I hope you don't ever go heart-broken again! That would be disastrous, LOL!
 
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Sharrie ()
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I'm a traveler at heart & have been nicknamed Travel Queen by friends & colleagues alike. Traveling has been my life passion for the last decade or so. As we enter a new decade, I'm excited … more
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The 2011 Libyan protests began as a series of protests and confrontations occurring in the North African state of Libya against the Government of Libya and its de facto leader Muammar al-Gaddafi. The unrest began on 15 February 2011 and continues to the present. Media outlets have reported the unrest as being inspired by the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia, connecting the protests with the wider 2010–2011 Middle East and North Africa protests. According to Richard Engel, NBC News Chief Foreign Correspondent, who entered Libya and had reached the city of Tobruk on 22 February 2011, "the protest movement is no longer a protest movement, it's a war. It's open revolt." On 22 February, The Economist described the events as an "uprising that is trying to reclaim Libya from the world's longest-ruling autocrat."

Protests have centered on Libya's two largest cities, the capital of Tripoli in the west, and Benghazi in the east and tends to spread to other cities. On 18 February, demonstrators took control over most of Benghazi, the country's second-largest city, with some support from police and defecting military units. The government reacted by sending elite troops and mercenaries, which were resisted by Benghazi's inhabitants and insurrectionary members of the military. By 20 February, more than 200 people had been killed in Benghazi. Protests in Tripoli have centered around Green Square. On 21 February, Libyan Air Force aircraft ...
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