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The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

New Age, Soundtracks, and World Music album by Enya and The Shore

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Dark and majestic.

  • Nov 29, 2001
  • by
Rating:
+5
Music is critically important in films where the world is magical and based in fantasy. Music helps create these worlds, and Howard Shore's Lord of the Rings score is so evocative that I can see Middle-Earth as it plays. The music is breathtaking, and I can't fathom how much it will add to the drama of the film. Although it waxes the Hollywood's conventional strings-and-percussion arrangements a bit, Shore diversifies with magnificent, gothic choirs and a very "dark" feel. Sometimes the compositions take you soaring through the skies: one particular theme plays through the album frequently, and it flows with a good feeling of heroism. The pounding "The Bridge of Khazad Dum" also raises your spirits but also employs a sense of tension in the quivering layers of strings. The mid-section of "A Journey in the Dark" is positively inspiring (although it gets back to a sinister feeling quick). "Concerning Hobbits" is the ultimate "village song," with lively melodies and a nice bucolic feel. Many tracks, however, possess an incredible sense of menace that bodes well for the movie's "dark & misty" look. "The Shadow of the Past" and "The Treason of Isengard" come to mind. Enya's contributions ("The Council of Elrond" and "May It Be") are beautiful, and representative of her work. The wordless melodies of "The Council of Elrond" are very pretty with a limpid musical background. The whole warmth of the vibe is very "elf-like." The opener, "Prophecy," is paralyzing in its shadowy splendor. One thing of note: rarely do the songs rely on one mood...they are mostly extremely dynamic compositions shifting through different symphonic textures to alter the tone appropriately. Fans of Lord of the Rings have probably already bought this, but if you like epic movie soundtracks (with choirs!), don't miss out.

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More The Lord of the Rings: The Fel... reviews
review by . July 28, 2010
Howard Shore's Lord of the Rings sountracks are easily the best movie soundtracks since Star Wars (I mean the original trilogy). This is a masterpiece. It combines beautiful, heart-rendering songs (particularly any of the Elves' themes) with great action/adventure scores (the Fellowship theme). The soundtrack has such emotional power that, even without seeing the scenes in the movie, you can just feel what's going to happen.      The Fellowship of the Ring of course …
review by . July 27, 2010
Howard Shore's Lord of the Rings sountracks are easily the best movie soundtracks since Star Wars (I mean the original trilogy). This is a masterpiece. It combines beautiful, heart-rendering songs (particularly any of the Elves' themes) with great action/adventure scores (the Fellowship theme). The soundtrack has such emotional power that, even without seeing the scenes in the movie, you can just feel what's going to happen.    The Fellowship of the Ring of course defines many …
review by . December 30, 2001
A soundtrack is usually an album that has all the vocal music to a movie, with perhaps an instrumental or two and maybe a few lines of dialogue. A score is an album that contains most of the instrumental music from a movie. Back in the day, a soundtrack included all of the music from a movie on one album. However, the studio money makers realized that they could make more money by splitting the instrumentals from the vocal songs. That's why a lot of films have both a soundtrack and a score. With …
review by . March 11, 2002
Howard Shore had a virtually impossible task. How DOES one go about composing a score for a movie based on a book beloved by hundreds of millions of people over the last half-century? Inevitably, some will approve, and some won't. Does the music match the story as the reader can imagine it? If so, the reader is likely to approve! If not, then the reader is likely to disapprove.This reader (text 20 times) and viewer (movie 3 times) feels that Shore did his job well. I can play the music (as I am …
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Clayton Reeder ()
Ranked #442
Rogue capitalist in search of all that is interesting, weird, or beautiful.      Collected here are my hundreds of reviews from Amazon.com, covering mostly music that is offensive … more
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Wiki

Score composer Howard Shore has informed this first installment of theLord of the Ringstrilogy with his distinctly modern sensibilities. Revolving loosely around a brief, heroic brass theme, this epic is infused with a powerful rhythmic thrust and a musical range that encompasses centuries (from the Renaissance pastoralism of "Concerning Hobbits" to the fiery, Prokofiev-influenced drama of "A Knife in the Dark"). Key to the score's sense of mystery and magical place are the rich choral passages that are interspersed throughout, some so ominously gothic they makeThe Phantom Menace's "Duel of the Fates" sound almost sunny by comparison. Enya's contributions ("The Council of Elrond" and the song "May It Be") add a sense of organic tranquility, but it's Shore's Wagnerian-scaled orchestral score that should long be cherished by admirers of film music and hobbits alike.--Jerry McCulley
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Details

Label: Reprise , Wea
Artist: Enya
Genre: World Music, Soundtracks, New Age
Release Date: November 20, 2001
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"Dark and majestic."
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