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Poutine

A dish consisting of French fries topped with fresh cheese curds, covered with brown gravy and sometimes additional ingredients.

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Happy Canada Day! Vancouver's BEST Poutine on Davie Street

  • Dec 16, 2010
  • by
Rating:
+3
Post image for Happy Canada Day! Vancouver's BEST Poutine on Davie Street

Happy Canada Day!

To celebrate Canada Day I am re-posting my poutine series on “The BEST Poutine on Davie Street”. What better way to celebrate being Canadian than to drool over our perhaps most famous authentic Canadian food: poutine!

This is Vancouver’s Best Poutine on Davie Street Part 4 of 4.

For the other posts in this Best Poutine on Davie Street series:

Please subscribe, rate & comment at my Follow Me Foodie YouTube channel. Thanks!

The following is the written conclusion and summary of The Quest for Vancouver’s BEST Poutine on Davie Street with material that may not be included in the videos.

The following is a quick recap/summary of the 3 poutines:

Poutine 1La Belle Patate

This is not representable of what is actually ordered. I’m so embarrassed…I forgot to take my picture before I started eating it. I didn’t follow usually routine because this was for the video blog.

La Belle Patate Traditional Poutine6/6

  • Small $5.50 Medium $7.50 Large $9.50
  • Red Potatoes, hand cut, skins on, freshly fried
  • The “gravy” or as they call it the “poutine sauce” is actually completely vegetarian. (A wheat based sauce)
  • They do offer meat “gravy” or meat “poutine sauce” and it’s under the name of “BBQ”
  • Best cheese curds – fresh, firm, squeaky, don’t melt
  • Authentic Montreal poutine
  • Foil to-go containers

Poutine 2La Brasserie

Truffle Poutine5/6

  • Fries, cheese curds, pork gravy, truffle oil $9
  • Kennebec potatoes, hand cut, skins on
  • Gourmet poutine
  • Best pork gravy with lots of truffle oil, a bit of a kick and freshly cracked black pepper
  • The cheese curds were part mozzarella cheese rather than an actual cheese curd.
  • It’s savoury, very aromatic with the truffle oil
  • Comfort food with a gourmet twist.

Poutine 3Fritz European Fry House

Poutine4/6

  • Small: $4.50 Medium: $5 Large: $6.50 Jumbo: $7.50
  • Russet Potatoes, hand cut, skins on, freshly fried
  • Firm and a bit crispier than the other two.
  • Layer their poutine – fries, cheese curds, gravy and repeat.
  • Good ratio of ingredients.
  • European Fry House – focus on dips
  • Gravy enhanced with black pepper and some dried herbs.
  • Mozzarella cheese curd – stringiest of all 3 places.
  • The most ooey gooey, saucy and cheesy poutine.
  • Muchies/Hangover food
  • Styrofoam to-go container

Added note: This review is a little different because it was for my video blog. Therefore the food at La Belle Patate, La Brasserie, and Fritz European Fry House was complimentary, (although I did offer to pay) but my opinions are still honest and as non-biased as I can be. The opinions and views expressed in “The Quest for Vancouver’s Best Poutine on Davie Street” review and video are those of Follow Me Foodie/Mijune only. There is no paid advertising and as always I write for the benefit of the customers and not for the restaurants.

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December 28, 2010
I'm drooling LOL...thanks so much for sharing! I haven't ever tried Poutine but, I might have to change that!
December 29, 2010
I'm happy to be the one to convince you!!
December 29, 2010
I'm happy you wrote about it :)
 
December 21, 2010
I usually don't like strong cheese (if at all), but this looks and sounds sinfully delightful, hah. Great review Mijune!
December 22, 2010
no way!! Cheese is so delicious though!! It's definitely a mild cheese similar to mozzarella so I think you'd like this one!
December 22, 2010
Hah, perfect! Mozzarella's just about the only cheese I can tolerate anyways, =]
 
1
More Poutine reviews
review by . July 26, 2009
posted in Gourmand
Poutine at Salt House
While expanding my knowledge on Wikipedia a couple of months ago, I came across the page for poutine.  I must've been looking up french fries or something, but my jaw dropped as I saw the picture and read the description.  I needed it in my belly.  It looked about as heart attack inducingly delicious as a blooming onion, but somehow, BETTER.  Must be the addition of cheese and gravy over all that fried stuff!  I had to have it.      I immediately …
About the reviewer
Mijune ()
Ranked #316
I'm a food blogger in Vancouver, but I also post internationally. Follow Me Foodie on my tasty adventures! http://followmefoodie.com @FollowMeFoodie
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Wiki

Poutine is a dish consisting of French fries topped with fresh cheese curds, covered with brown gravy and sometimes additional ingredients.

Poutine is a diner staple which originated in Quebec and can now be found across Canada. It is sold by both fast food chains (such as New York Fries, Harvey's, Ed's Subs), in small "greasy spoon" type diners (commonly known as "casse-croûtes" in Quebec) and pubs, as well as by roadside chip wagons. International chains like McDonald's, A&W, KFC and Burger King also sell mass-produced poutine. Popular Quebec restaurants that serve poutine include Chez Ashton (Quebec City), La Banquise (Montreal), Louis (Sherbrooke), Lafleur Restaurants, Franx Supreme, La Belle Province, Le Petit Québec and Dic Ann's Hamburgers. Along with fries and pizza, poutine is a very common dish sold and eaten in high school cafeterias in various parts of Canada.

The dish originated in rural Quebec, Canada, in the late 1950s. Several Québécois communities claim to be the birthplace of poutine, including Drummondville (by Jean-Paul Roy in 1964), Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, and Victoriaville. One often-cited tale is that of Fernand Lachance, from Warwick, Quebec, which claims that poutine was invented in 1957, when a customer ordered fries while waiting for his cheese curds from the Kingsey cheese factory in Kingsey Falls (now in Warwick and owned by Saputo Incorporated). Lachance is said to have exclaimed ça va...
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