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Sherlock: Season One

A movie directed by Euros Lyn and Paul McGuigan

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Although overdone, this series is worth watching

  • Oct 26, 2010
Rating:
+5
It is clear that the authors of this series and the actors who act it out want to show Holmes in a strange light, but despite this, or perhaps because of it, the films are interesting and worth watching.

For example, in the first film, there are several references to Holmes being homosexual - for instance, his landlady suggests that he and Watson may not need a second bed, and Holmes seems, but it is unclear, to deny it. There is nothing wrong with he being homosexual, but it is introduced into the story in a way that makes it appear that Holmes is strange. Holmes is depicted with psychological problems, perhaps even being a sociopath - he even says so himself. Police officers call him a psychopath and justify their claim with examples of his weird behavior. One suggests that he will soon fall apart completely. Two of his family members are very concerned about him and feel strongly that he needs a watchman. They are willing to pay a person to watch him. Holmes is obsessed with the need to solve crimes. He takes no money for doing so. He calls out in delight at the complexity of a case even though his delight involves the death of four people - he likes that they are dead. He is unable to get along with people and has no friends, not one. People who like him, like him because he helped them with a case, such as his landlady who is thankful for his involvement in a case concerning her husband. His behavior is asocial: he ignores people, walks out on them, and even insults them. We hear him calling Watson a name. We see him insult a girl twice who seemingly put on lipstick to impress him and then takes it off when he says he does not like it.

Watson is also shown to have a psychological problem in this episode. His therapist says that he is depressed because he was shot during the Afghanistan War. She is wrong. It is worse. He has a need for action; he does not need to get away from action. He limps, not because of his wound, but because of his boredom. As soon as he has a chance to act, he looses his limp.

The first episode ends with no explanation of how the criminal was successful in inducing his victims to commit suicide while he was unhurt. This is not a fault. Many films and books end in this kind of obscure manner, leaving it to the watcher or reader to decide the ending. What is significant is that Holmes puts himself in danger because of his compulsion to solve the case.

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More Sherlock: Season One reviews
Quick Tip by . January 04, 2012
posted in Movie Hype
I'm jonzin so bad for more episodes I'm almost willing to hit myself in the head enough to forget the first three. The real reason I don't isn't that I'm afraid I'll mess up, I'm afraid I would wind up watching Never Let Me Go again and get all mad and confused all over again.
Quick Tip by . January 04, 2012
posted in Movie Hype
I'm jonzin so bad for more episodes I'm almost willing to hit myself in the head enough to forget the first three. The real reason I don't isn't that I'm afraid I'll mess up, I'm afraid I would wind up watching Never Let Me Go again and get all ,ad and confused all over agin
About the reviewer
Israel Drazin ()
Ranked #66
Dr. Israel Drazin is the author of twenty books, including a series of five volumes on the Aramaic translation of the Hebrew Bible, which he co-authors with Dr. Stanley M. Wagner, and a series of four … more
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About this movie

Wiki

In the wake of Guy Ritchie's reimagining, the BBC puts its own stamp on Arthur Conan Doyle's sleuth--and sets him in a London filled with cell phones and laptops. In the pilot, director Paul McGuigan (a keen visual stylist) introduces Sherlock Holmes (Atonement's Benedict Cumberbatch) as a "high-functioning sociopath" and Dr. John Watson (The Office's Martin Freeman) as an army veteran with posttraumatic stress disorder. Through a mutual friend, the two become flatmates at 221B Baker Street (Una Stubbs plays their landlady). Holmes, who consults with Scotland Yard inspector Lestrade (Rupert Graves) on his trickier cases, drafts Watson to assist him.

In "Study in Pink," four people commit suicide by poison. When Holmes sets out to establish a link, he falls right into the culprit's clutches. Other cases concern a smuggling operation ("The Blind Banker") and a mad bomber ("The Great Game"). Though he doesn't make a formal entrance until episode 3, Sherlock's archenemy, Moriarty (Andrew Scott), has a hand in each mystery, while the detective's brother, Mycroft (cocreator Mark Gatiss), first appears when he tries to hire Watson as a spy, an offer the good doctor refuses. Through his job at a medical office, Watson also meets Sarah (Zoe Telford), who becomes his girlfriend.

Part of the fun of Jeremy Brett's Holmes (and Agatha Christie's Poirot) came from the period details, so this update takes a little getting used to--as does the occasional mumbled line--but Cumberbatch and ...

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Details

DVD Release Date: November 9, 2010
Runtime: 461 minutes
Studio: BBC Warner
First to Review
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