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Sir Adam's Micro Review: Diving Bell and the Butterfly

  • Jan 9, 2009
  • by
Rating:
+3
Tragic and beautiful, Diving Bell takes you on an unrestricted journey of dreams and memories. Tom Waits song as the credits roll couldn't be more perfectly placed. Rewatch Factor: 4 and 1/2 Stars

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More The Diving Bell and the Butter... reviews
review by . December 31, 2010
posted in Movie Hype
**** out of ****      "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly" is a beautiful film, and there is virtually no other way to describe it. Never has a modern biopic depicted such a potent mix of emotions, humor, and humanity. Julian Schnabel's film must be something truly special in order to do what it does so wonderfully. It is a film which I could recommend to just about anyone with their humanity in-tact. The genius of the film is that without reading the memoir of the …
review by . May 02, 2008
posted in Movie Hype
Life is filled with contingencies. We worry about them; they creep up on us; they challenge us and shape us. How people adapt to tragedy, however, can be a source of fascination and inspiration. One of the best things a film can do is to get us into others' shoes and show how their inner journey unfolds for them.     Such is the case of `The Diving Bell and the Butterfly,' based on the autobiographical account of Jean-Dominique Bauby (Mathieu Almaric), the editor for Frances' …
review by . May 01, 2008
Julian Schnabel, well accepted as one of the important visual artists of our time, continues to impress with his small but elite group of films, proving that paintings and cinema are closely related as a means to reach the psyche. In 'Le Scaphandre et le papillon' ('The Diving Bell and the Butterfly') he has transformed the memoir of Jean-Dominique Bauby (with the sensitive screen adaptation by Ronald Harwood) into an experience for the mind and the heart. It is an extraordinary blend of visual …
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Adam Hunnicutt ()
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Member Since: Sep 1, 2010
Last Login: Jun 21, 2011 08:29 PM UTC
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The seemingly claustrophobic story of a man imprisoned in his paralyzed body becomes a dazzling and expansive movie about love, imagination, and the will to live. After a stroke, Jean-Dominique Bauby (Mathieu Amalric,Kings and Queen) can only move his left eye--and through that eye he learns to communicate, one letter at a time. With the help of his speech therapist (Marie-Josee Croze,Munich) and a stenographer (Anne Consigny,Anna M.), Bauby writes the stunning memoirThe Diving Bell and the Butterfly. But such a plot summary makes the movie sound like lofty, self-important medicine--far from it. Director Julian Schnabel (Basquiat,Before Night Falls), working from an elegant screenplay by Ronald Harwood (The Pianist) and with an oustanding cast (which also includesFrantic'sEmmanuelle Seigner as Bauby's neglected wife), has created a movie as engrossing and hypnotic as a thriller, a movie that wrestles with mortality yet has stubborn streaks of dark humor and eroticism, that portrays a man who overcomes unimaginable obstacles but refuses to paint him as a saint. Schnabel was once dismissed as a pompous and overblown painter, but he's crafted an intimate visual poem, a humble sonata about life at its most fragile.--Bret Fetzer
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