|
Movies Books Music Food Tv Shows Technology Politics Video Games Parenting Fashion Green Living more >

Lunch » Tags » Movies » Reviews » The Godfather: Part III » User review

On Godfather Part III

  • Jul 25, 2003
Rating:
+5
I have seen this film several times, all the way through or in parts. Frankly, I have mixed emotions about it because, when discussing it, I want to be fair and focus on it as a discrete film, judging it on its own terms; however, that is so difficult for me because it is the third of three Godfather films and its two predecessors are masterpieces. I cannot exclude vivid memories of scenes and even comments from films I first saw 18 and then 14 years before seeing this one in 1990. OK, that's my challenge. I finally decided to try to rate it on its own terms, hence the Three Stars. What it has going for it includes Pacino's talent, several plausible conflicts, brilliant cinematography, and a tone of melancholy which is consistent throughout the narrative. After years of broken promises to wife Kay (Diane Keaton), Michael has almost completed a process by which to extricate himself and his family from organized crime. However, his marriage has ended, mortal enemies remain such as Altobello (Eli Wallach) and Joey Zaza (Joe Montegna), his negotiations with the Vatican encounter unexpected complications, and finally, his physical health is poor as pressures and tensions in his life intensify. It is no wonder that he suffers a severe heart attack in his kitchen ("Just when I think I'm out....") from which he never fully recovers.

However, the film has several problems. One concerns the lack of a primary plot to give the narrative cohesion. There are hundreds of individual episodes in The Godfather and Godfather Part II (as in other films such as Lawrence of Arabia and Doctor Zhivago) but they are coordinated effectively. Not so of the episodes in this film. Sofia Coppola's performance as Mary Corleone has been savaged by most critics. In fact, she is reputed to be a late replacement for Wynona Rider, had no prior acting experience in films, and was given a role as trivial as Anne Archer's in the three Jack Ryan films. I will not join others in bashing her. Another of the film's flaws is director Coppola and the three screenwriters' failure to do more with the role of Vincent Mancini (Andy Garcia). So many missed opportunities as Garcia's great talents are under-utilized, especially when on-screen with his obviously exhausted Uncle Michael. The illegitimate son of Santino ("Sonny") Corleone, Vincent is only occasionally allowed to show some of his father's passion, providing energy which this film desperately needs and otherwise lacks.

The jumpy plot and underdeveloped characters are, in my opinion, this film's major weakness but it has several fine moments as when Vincent challenges Zaza, when Michael meets with Cardinal Lamberto (Raf Vallone), the deadly sequence as the performance in the opera house proceeds to its conclusion, and the final scene when Michael reflects upon his empty life. Judged only on its own terms, Three Stars. Let's all hope that there will be no Part IV.

What did you think of this review?

Helpful
0
Thought-Provoking
0
Fun to Read
0
Well-Organized
0
Post a Comment
More The Godfather: Part III reviews
review by . June 23, 2011
posted in Movie Hype
*** out of ****     It's been a long three nights. In this time, I watched a "Godfather" film per night. I was blown away by "The Godfather" and astounded by "The Godfather: Part II", which as I mentioned in my review, is inferior to the first, but still, in my opinion, a very good piece of film. Perhaps I should say the same for the concluding chapter of this epic trilogy. It is often considered the worst film of the three. Some even think it's a bad movie all-together. But …
review by . August 09, 2006
At the end of the 1980s, Francis Ford Coppola's Zoetrope Studios was nearly bankrupt. Zoetrope needed money, and it didn't take a genius to figure out how to get it. They would make another GODFATHER movie. And that is how, sixteen years after THE GODFATHER: PART II, we were given THE GODFATHER: PART III.    The film begins in 1979. Michael Corleone (Al Pacino) has finally given up his life of crime and is building a reputation as a respectable philanthropist. When Victor Mancini …
review by . April 15, 2005
posted in Movie Hype
I have seen this film several times, all the way through or in parts. Frankly, I have mixed emotions about it because, when discussing it, I want to be fair and focus on it as a discrete film, judging it on its own terms; however, for me at least, that is impossible because it is the third of three Godfather films and its two predecessors are masterpieces. I cannot exclude vivid memories of scenes and even comments from films I first saw 18 and then 14 years before seeing this one for the first …
review by . August 24, 2001
posted in Movie Hype
. . .feeling that it was a significant "comedown" after the first two. I differ in that opinion. I much preferred "Part III" to "Part II", feeling that the theme of attempted redemption and reconciliation was extremely powerful. Michael is again trying to keep his family intact, while coming under increasing fire from other organized crime figures (literally). He is consumed with guilt over the "hit" he had ordered on his brother. He is trying to remain connected with his children, and to make amends …
About the reviewer
Robert Morris ()
Ranked #169
Professionally, I am an independent management consultant who specializes in accelerated executive development and breakthrough high-impact organizational performance. I also review mostly business books … more
Consider the Source

Use Trust Points to see how much you can rely on this review.

You
Robert1936
Your ratings:
rate more to improve this
About this movie

Wiki

Sixteen years after Francis Ford Coppola won his second Oscar forThe Godfather II (his first was for the 1972 Godfather), the director and star Al Pacino attempted to revive the concept one more time. Despite an elaborate plot that involves Michael Corleone seeking redemption through the Vatican while simultaneously preparing his nephew (Andy Garcia) to take over the Corleone family, the film fails to take shape as a truly meaningful experience in the way the preceding movies do. Still, Pacino is very moving as an elder Michael, filled with regret and trying hard to make amends with his wife (Diane Keaton) and grown children (one of whom is played, and not all that well, by the director's daughter, Sofia Coppola).--Tom Keogh
view wiki

Details

Genre: Action, Adventure, Drama
Release Date: December 25, 1990
MPAA Rating: R
Screen Writer: Francis Ford Coppola
Runtime: 170 minutes
Studio: Paramount Pictures
Polls with this movie
8MM

The best Neo-Noirs

by

© 2014 Lunch.com, LLC All Rights Reserved
Lunch.com - Relevant reviews by real people.
()
This is you!
Ranked #
Last login
Member since
reviews
comments
ratings
questions
compliments
lists