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Lunch » Tags » Movies » Reviews » The Rules of the Game - Criterion Collection (1939) » User review

The Rules of the Game - Criterion Collection

Art House & International and Classics movie

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Sir Adam's Micro Review: The Rules of the Game

  • Jan 9, 2009
Rating:
+3
Entering the film, I wasn't sure what kind of sauce Ebert was hitting when he called this "perhaps the greatest film EVER". As it came to a close, I think it is not THE BEST, but if they were to make a WFI (World Film Institute) and create a top 100 list, this would most definitely be on it. Rewatch Factor: Four and 1/2 Stars

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Adam Hunnicutt ()
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Member Since: Sep 1, 2010
Last Login: Jun 21, 2011 08:29 PM UTC
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About this movie

Wiki

Consistently cited by critics worldwide as one of the greatest films ever made, Jean Renoir's bittersweet drama of life, love, class, and the social code of manners and behavior ("the rules of the game") is a savage critique undertaken with sensitivity and compassion. Renoir's catch-phrase through the film, "Everyone has their reasons," develops a multilayered meaning by the conclusion. A young aviator (Roland Toutain) commits a serious social faux pas by alluding to an affair on national radio. To avert a scandal, the cultured Robert de la Chesnaye (Marcel Dalio), husband to the aviator's mistress, Christine (Nora Gregor), and a philanderer in his own right, invites all to a weekend hunting party in his country mansion. The complicated maze of marriages and mistresses (social register and servant class alike) is plotted like a bedroom farce, but the tone soon takes a darker cast. Renoir, who also takes the pivotal role as Andre's jovial pal and de la Chesnaye confidant Octave, deftly blends high comedy with cutting satire as he parallels the upstairs-downstairs affairs. The film builds to a comic pitch with the hilarious performance of Julien Carette as a rabbit poacher turned groundskeeper, but soon turns tragic in a devastating conclusion. The film was roundly condemned and banned in France upon its 1939 release, but years later (out of the shadow of WWII) the film was rediscovered for the masterpiece that it is.--Sean Axmaker
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Details

DVD Release Date: January 20, 2004
Runtime: 110 minutes
Studio: Criterion

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