|
Movies Books Music Food Tv Shows Technology Politics Video Games Parenting Fashion Green Living more >

Lunch » Tags » Youtube » Reviews » Pale Blue Dot » User review

Pale Blue Dot

Passage taken from Dr. Carl Sagan's book about how seeing earth from Voyager leaving our star system can give us a great new perspective

< read all 1 reviews

We are here: "... Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand."

  • Jan 27, 2010
  • by
Rating:
+5
This passage is, in my opinion, one of the greatest passages I've heard in the little bit of English oratory history that I know.

I grew up watching a few Carl Sagan documentaries. These are my favorite sentences from the piece:
"That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there -- on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam."

" In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves."

" Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand."

"To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known."

It's a kind call for considering our own conceit in relation to vast "emptiness" full of unknown mystery. Instead of killing ourselves and finding reasons to beat ourselves down just seeing how small the earth is from Voyager's vantage as it went far-er away than anything we've built before, it really does remind us to look again at ourselves.

Carl Sagan's voice is always full of awe and the want of understanding.  His thoughtful words are very eloquent but as a good teacher, he relates very simply. Hearing him talk about the world from this perspective helped me not only appreciate the planet, people/other living beings, and nature but also the time that we have been alive and the time we are alive right now. I have the youtube clip bookmarked and I always come back and take a listen whenever my head is somewhere else.

What did you think of this review?

Helpful
3
Thought-Provoking
3
Fun to Read
3
Well-Organized
3
Post a Comment
About the reviewer
Supun Edirisinghe ()
Ranked #269
I'm a mellow type of fellow that's calm and plain supun edirisinghe is my name
Consider the Source

Use Trust Points to see how much you can rely on this review.

You
supune
Your ratings:
rate more to improve this
About this online video

from http://www.ijourney.org/?tid=682: This excerpt from A Pale Blue Dot was inspired by an image taken, at Sagan's suggestion, by Voyager 1 on February 14, 1990. As the spacecraft left our planetary neighborhood for the fringes of the solar system, engineers turned it around for one last look at its home planet. Voyager 1 was about 6.4 billion kilometers (4 billion miles) away, and approximately 32 degrees above the ecliptic plane, when it captured this portrait of our world. Caught in the center of scattered light rays (a result of taking the picture so close to the Sun), Earth appears as a tiny point of light, a crescent only 0.12 pixel in size.

Wiki

That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there -- on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from ...

view wiki

Details

© 2014 Lunch.com, LLC All Rights Reserved
Lunch.com - Relevant reviews by real people.
()
This is you!
Ranked #
Last login
Member since
reviews
comments
ratings
questions
compliments
lists