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Who Can You Trust?

  • Mar 4, 2013
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+5
Trust is one of those fundamental concepts that all of us take more or less for granted. It is essential glue that binds all functional relationships, and thanks to trust it is possible to live in incredibly complex societies with many oftentimes very competitive interests and yet be reasonably assured of one's safety. However, once we start probing the nature of trust deeper, we realize how nuanced the notion of trust it really is. It involves much more than mare factual accuracy, knowledge, and it's not restricted to individual human beings, but it has a much wider scope.

In "Trust: A Very Short Introduction" Katherine Hawley takes on a wide-ranging tour of trust, as it is best understood today. The book focuses on cultural, psychological, and philosophical questions that are relevant for the deeper understanding of this concept. The book is fairly detailed for such a short introduction, but it still manages to be accessible and informative for a wide range of readers. Hawley is an engaging and well-informed writer, and this book was definitely a pleasure to read. It is one of the better such book in this "Very Short Introduction" series. I would definitely recommend it to anyone who is interested in the topic of trust, as well as most other curious readers who want to broaden their intellectual horizons.

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About the reviewer
Bojan Tunguz ()
Ranked #53
I am a benevolent rascal. I love lounging in bed on a Sunday morning. Rainy days make me melancholy, but in a good kind of way. I am an incorrigible chocoholic. I hate Mondays, but I get over it by Wednesday. … more
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Katherine Hawleyis Professor of Philosophy at the University of St Andrews and Head of the School of Philosophical, Anthropological and Film Studies. She is the author ofHow Things Persist(OUP, 2001) and co-editor ofPhilosophy of Science Today(with Peter Clark, OUP, 2003).
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