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Quality filter that reduces UV haze and protects your lens

  • Dec 1, 2005
Rating:
+5
Why should you get a Haze (UV) filter? The benefits include correcting Ultraviolet (UV) light which may cast a bluish tint to your images and obscure distant details, and protection of your front lens element.

The UV-Haze filter will improve your images when photographing mountain and marine scenes, where increased haze threatens to make your photographs indistinct in color and clarity. Be aware that this filter reduces Ultraviolet (UV) haze, and not haze related to other reasons like smog.

Photographers tend to debate the protection aspect of UV filters. Some say it will degrade an image to a certain extent and can increase the likelihood of lens flare. These are legitimate concerns that can be minimized with a quality lens filter. If the scene you are shooting doesn't present UV haze concerns, the filter most likely isn't doing anything to improve your image.

Hoya has designed the Pro-1 filter with these problems in mind. They applied 12 layers of Super Multicoating to the surfaces of this filter to produce an average transmission of 99.7%. Coupled with maximum surface precision, this allows for increased resistance to flare. Monocoated filters (standard inexpensive type) do not resist flares nearly as much.

In my case I shoot quite a bit of amateur softball. Using Canon L lenses (expensive) the last thing I want is to wipe the dust off my front element and accidentally scratch it. I would much rather scratch a filter due to the difference in cost between replacing the filter and repairing the lens.

Even though the protection provided by this filter is invaluable when I shoot amateur softball, I leave it on for all shooting scenarios. I wouldn't think of doing so with a low quality UV filter. I only remove it when I am using other filters and I'm not interested in stacking.

Another benefit of the Pro-1 series is the double threaded super slim filter that is more than 40% lighter than standard filters. The weight difference doesn't mean a whole lot to me, but a thinner filter means one can stack filters or use on wide angle lenses with less chance of vignetting (unwanted darkening of the image's corners). With the front threaded, this filter will accept lens caps without difficulty.

PROS:
Double threaded super slim ring
Increased resistance to flare
Filters out UV light
Protects front lens element

CONS:
Shallow front lens threading

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HOYA 58MM UV SUPER HMC PRO 1
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