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PISCO SOUR

An alcoholic drink from Peru or Chile.

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Peru's National Drink Goes Down a Little Too Easily...

  • Nov 9, 2010
Rating:
+5
A couple of years ago, I volunteered for a wonderful volunteer-abroad organization, Cross Cultural Solutions, and chose Peru as my destination. On my first evening, my mom took me to a local restaurant and told me to order a Pisco to go with my Ceviche (we were in Peru after all, and this was the National Drink and the National Dish- what a place, I was gonna love it here!). Actually, her exact words were: "Trust me, you're going to love this- it may just replace your margarita fascination." Upon first taste, it was so good that I almost ended up pounding it like a frat boy and his Natty Light Ice. My mom cautioned me to be careful, though it goes down easily, you will start to feel it. She was completely right- it's a definite creeper, meaning that at first you will feel little effect, if any, of the alcohol but, as time goes on, BAM! It hits you!
 
                                                        
A Pisco Sour balances sweet and sour perfectly, with real lemon juice and sugar (not pre-mixed whatever they put in those cocktail mixes). They both do a great job of masking the fiery taste of Pisco but, still allowing its flavors through. Pisco is made by fermenting grapes into wine and then, distilling the wine into a clear brandy.

 There is much contention on if the Pisco belongs to Chile or Peru and the two fight over it to this day. There are also two different stories on the history of Pisco: one tells the story of how the Spaniards brought the grape to the Pisco region but, in the 17th century Spain's King banned wine, so that the people of the region were forced to make another alcoholic drink from the grape. The other story says that when wine had been deemed inferior to export, it was given to local farmers who then distilled it into Pisco.


The recipe to the right is for a single serving but, since this drink is definitely a social one, I'll share with you the extremely easy recipe I was taught by one of our friends who was gracious enough to host us at his B&B in Urubamba. One of the pluses? Pisco cocktail hour every day at 5p with him and his lovely wife.
  • 4 cups of Ice
  • 3 cups of Pisco
  • 2 cups of sugar
  • 1 cup of lemon juice
  • Put all of this into a blender. Hit blend and add egg whites; blend again and top with bitters.

If you want to go hike the amazing Machu Picchu, I highly suggest planning your Peruvian trip over the first weekend in February- that Sunday is the National Pisco Sour Day. Whenever they play the National Anthem, you must finish your Pisco by the end of it or risk being looked at as another rude American tourist!
                                                 

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March 06, 2012
This looks like a good drink; however, I would recommend substituting "Equal" for the sugar.
March 06, 2012
Herbal substitutes for sugar include cinnamon or anise.
March 19, 2012
Not sure if it would affect the taste or not and I prefer sugar to the chemical substitutes such as Equal. If you substituted cinnamon or anise, it would have a completely different taste- I can't say that it would be bad, only different.
March 19, 2012
Trust me. You will appreciate the anise, cinnamon and other herbs once you get to the point of sticking your finger with needles to test blood sugar. After a couple of months of that, you'll learn to cut out sugar entirely with the exception of a few occasions during the year.
April 08, 2012
That's probably true!
April 08, 2012
It is very much true.
 
November 18, 2010
I was in Machu Picchu, Peru but I never did take to Pisco Sour as much as you did. I still prefer my Margarita! ;p
November 19, 2010
Isn't it just gorgeous? Margaritas ROCK, they're still my usual go-to at restaurants!
 
November 12, 2010
Bartender...one please! LOL! sweet write up, Sam!
November 12, 2010
Oh, woo- @devora and I found a place on the border of Hayes Valley- Pisco Latin Lounge, so you can have your very own Pisco in SF ;p
November 13, 2010
Let's go right now! I am flying to pick up Orlok! LOL!
 
November 09, 2010
After reading this review, I've decided:

1) I should make ceviche soon.
2) I need to go to Peru
3) I need to get a bottle of Pisco

:D
November 09, 2010
I'm down for all three! I had such a good time the first time around...we'll have to go through Cross Cultural Solutions so that we can drink and have a conscience ;p
 
November 09, 2010
I can see why you ordered that drink when we hung out in SF :)
November 09, 2010
:D
November 09, 2010
Wasn't it good? We'll have to that again sometime soon! Next time @devora will have to order for all of us ;p
 
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Samantha ()
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About this recipe

Wiki

  • 2 ounces Pisco
  • 1 ounce fresh lime juice
  • 1 dash Angostura Bitters
  • ¼ ounce superfine sugar
  • ½ egg white (pasteurized or fresh)

Shake all ingredients except bitters with ice. Strain into a Champagne flute. Dash with bitters.

Yield: 1 serving


Served: Straight Up without ice
view wiki

Tags

Alcoholic Beverages, Chile, Peru, Alcoholic Drinks, Pisco, South American Drinks
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