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Django Unchained

The 2012 film by Quentin Tarantino

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Django broke free of those chains, if only Tarantino could get back on his though.

  • Jan 5, 2013
Rating:
+3
For almost 10 years now, Tarantino has regaled us with his takes on his favorite genre of movies, the grindhouse karate and massacre exploitation variety.  This was fun for a while and while Tarantino is a skilled director and writer, this is really starting to get old hat since we have seen this before.  I'm about to take a line from Roger Ebert as tacky as that may be: "Now that we know what kind of movie Tarantino can make, it's time for him to make a better one."

Django Unchained tells us the story of a German Bounty Hunter played by Christoph Waltz who one night finds a chain gang of slave traders, carrying a seemingly unimportant man, Django who knows the whereabouts of the bounty hunter's latest targets.  Setting Django free, the two set off armed with guns, panache and in Waltz's characters case King a silver tongue.  Seems that Django knows what three of King's next targets look like and can identify them to bring in some bounty bucks.  The two strike up a friendship of a teacher and student, but King develops another plan and that or helping Django rescue his wife who he was separated from and is currently enslaved at a rich plantation owners house.

Let me deviate for a moment here and talk of Tarantino's previous work with Inglroius Basterds.  A movie whoes commercials showed us  WWII guerrilla's killing and scalping Nazis and having a grand ole time.  The movie is more about the film world gathering at a Nazi movie premire to assassinate Hitler with Brad Pitt's Basterd's playing a smaller role.

Django Unchained shows us in it's advertisement, a black slave being freed and "getting paid to kill white people."  Well after the introductions and some adventuring in the countryside, the remaining HALF of this 2 and a half hour runtime is set on the wife story and reuiniting with her and getting her freedom.

I'm not saying that either is a bad story, just in both cases it's not what I wanted or was expecting.

Tarantino has long been applauded with his dialouge and story telling and both are on display well here, but at one point you must wonder when an editor would have stepped in and cut down on some scenes.  It would feel like sacrilege to some but this is the case of stretching you're story out and out and out and ringing it clean.

The movie though inspite of my pics is a great movie.  When the action does kick in, it kicks in and Tarantino has no problem with ludicrus gibs and squibs and bodies explode into blood globs at gun fire.  Every time towards the end that the movie might be approaching a conclusion, it picks up again and gives us another scenario on top of another making you guess how the movie will end.  The conclusion won't be in too much doubt but how it gets there is part of the movie's fun.

Speaking of fun, Samuel L Jackson........I will say this.  For all the accolades that Leonardo DiCaprio is getting for his role as the main villian, Calvin Candie the plantation owner.  Samuel L Jackson should be getting just as much applause if not more playing what must be the most different role of his career.  A desecated senior house slave with no respect for himself but only for his master.  A role you could never see SAMUEL L JACKSON playing ever.  Not only is Jackson freaking awesome in this role, but you can almost tell he is enjoying playing the part and playing against type and stretching out.

Django Unchained is more fun from Tarantino, but after this, I want to see him ride off into the sunset with this part of his career over.  No more exploitation homages.  Even if he has to go back to the well with the blacksuits and sunglasses of his earlier work I want something different from this man of talent but while he revels in what he loves, a better movie you know is in the recesses of his mind.
Django broke free of those chains, if only Tarantino could get back on his though. Django broke free of those chains, if only Tarantino could get back on his though.

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January 05, 2013
Yeah, I am in agreement with you on some of your observations. This was good, I enjoyed it a lot but once it hit the 122 minute mark and it had still gone on, I wasn't too impressed with the way it rounded it up. There were some scenes that could've been edited out (especially his own cameo imho)
January 05, 2013
Ironically his own cameo was the best acting he's ever done. I say that cause he usually sucks so hard at acting.
 
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More Django Unchained reviews
review by . December 27, 2012
posted in Movie Hype
A Mash of German Legend, Spaghetti Westerns, Modern Music, Samurai Flicks and Historical References.
When I saw Quentin Tarantino’s cameo appearance in Takashi Miike’s “Sukiyaki Western Django” (please see the original uncut of Miike’s movie before you judge it), I had a small hunch that the acclaimed director was about to go into something with the ‘western’ flavor (or so he states ‘southern’), and guess what, I wasn‘t far from wrong. Tarantino’s movies often become something to be anticipated, probably because of the fact …
review by . January 03, 2013
posted in Movie Hype
I am not a Tarentino "fan", having only seen his last two movies, and both are five star classics.  Before I saw these movies, my take on Tarentino based on skimming critical reviews was that Tarentino films glorified violence and were cartoonish B-grade movies.      Neither description applies to Inglorious Basterds and Django.  What we're talking about here isn't history, its morality.  In Basterds, Tarentino ripped any semblance of respect …
review by . January 02, 2013
posted in Movie Hype
A German Bounty Hunter/Dentist played by Christopher Waltz (who we last saw in Inglorious Basterds) tries to buy Django (Jamie Foxx) from a slaver. The reason? Django can identify three brothers who Waltz is hunting for a bounty. Waltz lets Django know that if he goes with him and points out his bounty, he will free Django and pay him for his trouble.      Django agrees to Waltz's offer and Waltz can only get him from the slavers in dramatic fashion (reminicent of Gene Wilder …
review by . December 23, 2012
posted in Movie Hype
Review: 'Quentin Tarantino creates an over the top funny, graphically violent, masterpiece (video)
'Django Unchained' Movie Review   By Joan Alperin Schwartz      Quentin Tarantino has done it again with this spaghetti style western.  'Django Unchained' is set in the South, two years before the Civil War.                                            &nb …
Quick Tip by . December 29, 2012
German bounty hunter frees a black slave to show him the trade of being a manhunter and to help him find his missing wife. More fulfilling then Inglorius Basterds but takes it's time just the same.
About the reviewer
John Nelson ()
Born in Wausau Wisconsin. Move at an early age to Ventura California and lived for 8 years. Growing up in a big city landscape didn't prepare me for my next move: Archbold Ohio with a population of … more
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Movies, Western, Quentin Tarantino, Kerry Washington, Christopher Waltz, Leonard Dicaprio

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