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The Dark Knight Rises

The 2012 film directed by Christopher Nolan based on the DC Comics character

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"Brutal, terrifying, heartbreaking, visceral, blood-pumping. A legendary spectacle."

  • Jul 26, 2012
Rating:
+5
This sort of spectacle is hardThis sort of spectacle is hard to be analyzed without being overly excited about it. Christopher Nolan's most ambitious project is flawless with all the flaws it has. The simple idea that you can progressively change the rules of the game is the most impressive thing about Nolan. This guy never stops pushing the envelope and the wonderful thing about it is that he's not doing it for money nor for fame, but because of his love and respect towards this amazing world which in many cases he called it home: the movie theater. The church of cinemaThe Dark Knight Rises concludes the first huge progressive trilogy in history, and sets it as one of the best trilogies of all time. Brutal and terrifying, emotional and heartbreaking, visceral and blood-pumping, this spectacle that rose from the ashes of the first two films, made this trilogy not only a work of art but already a legendary myth that will live for decades.to be analyzed without being overly excited about it. Christopher Nolan's most ambitious project is flawless with all the flaws it has. The simple idea that you can progressively change the rules of the game is the most impressive thing about Nolan. This guy never stops pushing the envelope and the wonderful thing about it is that he's not doing it for money nor for fame, but because of his love and respect towards this amazing world which in many cases he called it home: the movie theater. The church of cinema.

This sort of spectacle is hard to be analyzed without being overly excited about it. Christopher Nolan's most ambitious project is flawless with all the flaws it has. The simple idea that you can progressively change the rules of the game is the most impressive thing about Nolan. This guy never stops pushing the envelope and the wonderful thing about it is that he's not doing it for money nor for fame, but because of his love and respect towards this amazing world which in many cases he called it home: the movie theater. The church of cinema.


The Dark Knight Rises is not just the perfect ending to a trilogy, it's not just the denouement to the story of Bruce Wayne, but it is also -just as Batman Begins and The Dark Knight- Nolan's rhetoric on our current modern society. If in the past he took on fanaticism, crime, corruption, and terrorism, today Nolan polarized the screen with his vision of events like the "Occupy Wall Street" movement, the fanatic terrorist organizations, the so-called revolutionaries, Corporatism, all it's rotten apples and the democratic underground. Few dared to look more into the movie with a man in a black suit taking over Gotham's criminals in an oddly and surreal manor. Nolan's films, while more or less flawed, are smartly written, and crafted in a way in which only a film addict could think of. It's obvious we're talking about a filmmaker who respects the people, his audience, and wants to please his audience by offering them a smart product instead of just a colorful one. 


What is even more impressive is how he deals with his narrative content and how he paints that on film. The Dark Knight Rises is probably the less flawed Batman film. It's a wonderful story, that breathes and feeds from it's own spectacle that sets new bars in the world of action movies. It's a mesmerizing, immersive, brilliant execution that screams grandness at an unseen scale. It has never been done before in this manor. The strength of this film is not only in it's emotional and brutal story, but also in it's wonderful canvas, in it's grand portrayal of a blockbuster. The stakes have been raised so high it's impossible for me to think about what could be made better than this in the next few years. The fantastic coordination between the narrative, the actors' work, and the technical performance are the things that make me forget about all the tiny little flaws this film might have. It's a Batman movie at the end of the day, and it's the damn best one yet. 


Batman Begins started the story of Bruce Wayne and it's darker side, the Batman. A movie that treated "birth" and "fear" with respect, a title that changed the way superhero films would be seen. It was like the first time people saw Malcom X talk. A sudden surprising change in a world full of the superficial. The Dark Knight took that and brought it to a whole other level. It fed from the fear and introduced the shocking element of "chaos", making room for both Bruce Wayne and Batman to grow up and be more responsible than ever. On top of that, The Dark Knight brought the best played villain on screen since Hopkins' "Hannibal Lecter". Heath Ledger's incredible work on Joker will live forever in the glorious museum of cinema. What The Dark Knight Rises does is that it takes everything and moulds it into an emotional journey through "pain" and "sacrifice". It's a full-circle story that will never end because no story of this scale really ends.


Now take Hannibal Lecter, Jason, and dementia and mix them all into this ferocious, terrifying, and deadly beast named Bane, and you might make for Nolan's best written villain in the franchise. This guy is not only brutal but also eloquent like all the relevant revolutionary leaders of the last century. Bane isn't that sociopath who could laugh at you and either kill your or give you a candy. He'll just settle for your head. Tom Hardy shows no remorse, no second judgment, no exception. The peak of his character is when he gets back on the ground and becomes human again. From a godlike figure, a blood-thirsty gladiator, Bane becomes a stranger to tyranny. Hardy's portrayal is just as fascinating to watch as Ledger's. You have to take in consideration that what he did he did only with his eyes, his body, and his cadence. Only a great actor could do this kind of work with half his face covered by a mask. It's also almost frightening how socially relevant this villain is and how some people complained of him not being as exciting to watch "The Joker". I'm sorry for everyone who thought like this but they missed the whole point. They are different characters, both exciting and both important to Batman, that require different traits.


However, The Dark Knight Rises is not just about Bane but about most importantly about Bruce Wayne's legacy. It's about both Bruce Wayne's and Batman's rebirth, his will not only to survive but only to succeed in defending Gotham at any cost. It's also a story about Commissioner Gordon's (Gary Oldman) redemption, about the rise of a new White Knight in the hands of Detective Blake (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), and about Alfred's (Michael Caine) father-like role that brought me close to shed a tear or two. It's also about the silent steps of a cat in the back alley. And what a lovely and erotic performance that was. Anne Hathaway as Selina Kyle was sensual, rough, almost like a sexy anecdote. These actors poured their souls into their performances. Christian Bale as Bruce Wayne had to go through moments of clarity, singularity, confusion, pain, disappointment and sacrifice, making this performance the most complete and exciting of all three. Add Marion Cotillard as Miranda Tate, executive member of the Wayne Ent. board, Morgan Freeman as Lucius Fox, Ben Mendelsohn as Dagget, an eccentric and greedy millionaire, and even Matthew Modine, the star of Full Metal Jacket, as Commissioner Foley, and you have without a doubt probably the best ensemble in years.


Technically the movie looks incredible, Wally Pfister ending his career as a DP with another Oscar-worthy work of art. There is an incredible mixture of practical and CGI effects, great sound mixing and editing, with only few flaws that could irritate people and confuse them. The jump between two scenes that were separated by months in film time could be confusing because of their sudden flip. Or for example, the bad fight coordination at times especially between the cops and the mercenaries. However, these small flaws pale in front of this huge opera orchestrated by the explosive score of Hans Zimmer. Director Christopher Nolan deserves recognition at least now for his work of mastery in this film.

The Dark Knight Rises concludes the first huge progressive trilogy in history, and sets it as one of the best trilogies of all time. Brutal and terrifying, emotional and heartbreaking, visceral and blood-pumping, this spectacle that rose from the ashes of the first two films, made this trilogy not only a work of art but already a legendary myth that will live for decades.

Storyline/Dialogue: 9.0
Acting: 9.5
Technical Execution: 9.3
Replay Value: 10
====================
OVERALL: 9.6

The Dark Knight Rises is not just the perfect ending to a trilogy, it's not just the denouement to the story of Bruce Wayne, but it is also -just as Batman Begins and The Dark Knight- Nolan's rhetoric on our current modern society. If in the past he took on fanaticism, crime, corruption, and terrorism, today Nolan polarized the screen with his vision of events like the "Occupy Wall Street" movement, the fanatic terrorist organizations, the so-called revolutionaries, Corporatism, all it's rotten apples and the democratic underground. Few dared to look more into the movie with a man in a black suit taking over Gotham's criminals in an oddly and surreal manor. Nolan's films, while more or less flawed, are smartly written, and crafted in a way in which only a film addict could think of. It's obvious we're talking about a filmmaker who respects the people, his audience, and wants to please his audience by offering them a smart product instead of just a colorful one. 

What is even more impressive is how he deals with his narrative content and how he paints that on film. The Dark Knight Rises is probably the lesser flawed Batman film. It's a wonderful story, that breathes and feeds from it's own spectacle that sets new bars in the world of action movies. It's a mesmerizing, immersive, brilliant execution that screams grandness at an unseen scale. It has never been done before in this manor. The strength of this film is not only in it's emotional and brutal story, but also in it's wonderful canvas, in it's grand portrayal of a blockbuster. The stakes have been raised so high it's impossible for me to think about what could be made better than this in the next few years. The fantastic coordination between the narrative, the actors' work, and the technical performance are the things that make me forget about all the tiny little flaws this film might have. It's a Batman movie at the end of the day, and it's the damn best one yet. 

Batman Begins started the story of Bruce Wayne and it's darker side, the Batman. A movie that treated "birth" and "fear" with respect, a title that changed the way superhero films would be seen. It was like the first time people saw Malcom X talk. A sudden surprising change in a world full of the superficial. The Dark Knight took that and brought it to a whole other level. It fed from the fear and introduced the shocking element of "chaos", making room for both Bruce Wayne and Batman to grow up and be more responsible than ever. On top of that, The Dark Knight brought the best played villain on screen since Hopkins' "Hannibal Lecter". Heath Ledger's incredible work on Joker will live forever in the glorious museum of cinema. What The Dark Knight Rises does is that it takes everything and moulds it into an emotional journey through "pain" and "sacrifice". It's a full-circle story that will never end because no story of this scale really ends.

Now take Hannibal Lecter, Jason, and dementia and mix them all into this ferocious, terrifying, and deadly beast named Bane, and you might make for Nolan's best written villain in the franchise. This guy is not only brutal but also eloquent like all the relevant revolutionary leaders of the last century. Bane isn't that sociopath who could laugh at you and either kill your or give you a candy. He'll just settle for your head. Tom Hardy shows no remorse, no second judgment, no exception. The peak of his character is when he gets back on the ground and becomes human again. From a godlike figure, a blood-thirsty gladiator, Bane becomes a stranger to tyranny. Hardy's portrayal is just as fascinating to watch as Ledger's. You have to take in consideration that what he did he did only with his eyes, his body, and his cadence. Only a great actor could do this kind of work with half his face covered by a mask. It's also almost frightening how socially relevant this villain is and how some people complained of him not being as exciting to watch "The Joker". I'm sorry for everyone who thought like this but they missed the whole point. They are different characters, both exciting and both important to Batman, that require different traits.

However, The Dark Knight Rises is not just about Bane but about most importantly about Bruce Wayne's legacy. It's about both Bruce Wayne's and Batman's rebirth, his will not only to survive but only to succeed in defending Gotham at any cost. It's also a story about Commissioner Gordon's (Gary Oldman) redemption, about the rise of a new White Knight in the hands of Detective Blake (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), and about Alfred's (Michael Caine) father-like role that brought me close to shed a tear or two. It's also about the silent steps of a cat in the back alley. And what a lovely and erotic performance that was. Anne Hathaway as Selina Kyle was sensual, rough, almost like a sexy anecdote. These actors poured their souls into their performances. Christian Bale as Bruce Wayne had to go through moments of clarity, singularity, confusion, pain, disappointment and sacrifice, making this performance the most complete and exciting of all three. Add Marion Cotillard as Miranda Tate, executive member of the Wayne Ent. board, Morgan Freeman as Lucius Fox, Ben Mendelsohn as Dagget, an eccentric and greedy millionaire, and even Matthew Modine, the star of Full Metal Jacket, as Commissioner Foley, and you have without a doubt probably the best ensemble in years.

Technically the movie looks incredible, Wally Pfister ending his career as a DP with another Oscar-worthy work of art. There is an incredible mixture of practical and CGI effects, great sound mixing and editing, with only few flaws that could irritate people and confuse them. The jump between two scenes that were separated by months in film time could be confusing because of their sudden flip. Or for example, the bad fight coordination at times especially between the cops and the mercenaries. However, these small flaws pale in front of this huge opera orchestrated by the explosive score of Hans Zimmer. Director Christopher Nolan deserves recognition at least now for his work of mastery in this film.

The Dark Knight Rises concludes the first huge progressive trilogy in history, and sets it as one of the best trilogies of all time. Brutal and terrifying, emotional and heartbreaking, visceral and blood-pumping, this spectacle that rose from the ashes of the first two films, made this trilogy not only a work of art but already a legendary myth that will live for decades.

Storyline/Dialogue: 9.0

Acting: 9.5

Technical Execution: 9.3

Replay Value: 10

================

OVERALL: 9.6
The Dark Knight Rises is not just the perfect ending to a trilogy, it's not just the denouement to the story of Bruce Wayne, but it is also -just as Batman Begins and The Dark Knight- Nolan's rhetoric on our current modern society. If in the past he took on fanaticism, crime, corruption, and terrorism, today Nolan polarized the screen with his vision of events like the "Occupy Wall Street" movement, the fanatic terrorist organizations, the so-called revolutionaries, Corporatism, all it's rotten apples and the democratic underground. Few dared to look more into the movie with a man in a black suit taking over Gotham's criminals in an oddly and surreal manor. Nolan's films, while more or less flawed, are smartly written, and crafted in a way in which only a film addict could think of. It's obvious we're talking about a filmmaker who respects the people, his audience, and wants to please his audience by offering them a smart product instead of just a colorful one. 
 
What is even more impressive is how he deals with his narrative content and how he paints that on film. The Dark Knight Rises is probably the lesser flawed Batman film. It's a wonderful story, that breathes and feeds from it's own spectacle that sets new bars in the world of action movies. It's a mesmerizing, immersive, brilliant execution that screams grandness at an unseen scale. It has never been done before in this manor. The strength of this film is not only in it's emotional and brutal story, but also in it's wonderful canvas, in it's grand portrayal of a blockbuster. The stakes have been raised so high it's impossible for me to think about what could be made better than this in the next few years. The fantastic coordination between the narrative, the actors' work, and the technical performance are the things that make me forget about all the tiny little flaws this film might have. It's a Batman movie at the end of the day, and it's the damn best one yet. 
 
Batman Begins started the story of Bruce Wayne and it's darker side, the Batman. A movie that treated "birth" and "fear" with respect, a title that changed the way superhero films would be seen. It was like the first time people saw Malcom X talk. A sudden surprising change in a world full of the superficial. The Dark Knight took that and brought it to a whole other level. It fed from the fear and introduced the shocking element of "chaos", making room for both Bruce Wayne and Batman to grow up and be more responsible than ever. On top of that, The Dark Knight brought the best played villain on screen since Hopkins' "Hannibal Lecter". Heath Ledger's incredible work on Joker will live forever in the glorious museum of cinema. What The Dark Knight Rises does is that it takes everything and moulds it into an emotional journey through "pain" and "sacrifice". It's a full-circle story that will never end because no story of this scale really ends.
 
Now take Hannibal Lecter, Jason, and dementia and mix them all into this ferocious, terrifying, and deadly beast named Bane, and you might make for Nolan's best written villain in the franchise. This guy is not only brutal but also eloquent like all the relevant revolutionary leaders of the last century. Bane isn't that sociopath who could laugh at you and either kill your or give you a candy. He'll just settle for your head. Tom Hardy shows no remorse, no second judgment, no exception. The peak of his character is when he gets back on the ground and becomes human again. From a godlike figure, a blood-thirsty gladiator, Bane becomes a stranger to tyranny. Hardy's portrayal is just as fascinating to watch as Ledger's. You have to take in consideration that what he did he did only with his eyes, his body, and his cadence. Only a great actor could do this kind of work with half his face covered by a mask. It's also almost frightening how socially relevant this villain is and how some people complained of him not being as exciting to watch "The Joker". I'm sorry for everyone who thought like this but they missed the whole point. They are different characters, both exciting and both important to Batman, that require different traits.
 
However, The Dark Knight Rises is not just about Bane but about most importantly about Bruce Wayne's legacy. It's about both Bruce Wayne's and Batman's rebirth, his will not only to survive but only to succeed in defending Gotham at any cost. It's also a story about Commissioner Gordon's (Gary Oldman) redemption, about the rise of a new White Knight in the hands of Detective Blake (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), and about Alfred's (Michael Caine) father-like role that brought me close to shed a tear or two. It's also about the silent steps of a cat in the back alley. And what a lovely and erotic performance that was. Anne Hathaway as Selina Kyle was sensual, rough, almost like a sexy anecdote. These actors poured their souls into their performances. Christian Bale as Bruce Wayne had to go through moments of clarity, singularity, confusion, pain, disappointment and sacrifice, making this performance the most complete and exciting of all three. Add Marion Cotillard as Miranda Tate, executive member of the Wayne Ent. board, Morgan Freeman as Lucius Fox, Ben Mendelsohn as Dagget, an eccentric and greedy millionaire,  and even Matthew Modine, the star of Full Metal Jacket, as Commissioner Foley, and you have without a doubt probably the best ensemble in years.
 
Technically the movie looks incredible, Wally Pfister ending his career as a DP with another Oscar-worthy work of art. There is an incredible mixture of practical and CGI effects, great sound mixing and editing, with only few flaws that could irritate people and confuse them. The jump between two scenes that were separated by months in film time could be confusing because of their sudden flip. Or for example, the bad fight coordination at times especially between the cops and the mercenaries. However, these small flaws pale in front of this huge opera orchestrated by the explosive score of Hans Zimmer. Director Christopher Nolan deserves recognition at least now for his work of mastery in this film.
 
The Dark Knight Rises concludes the first huge progressive trilogy in history, and sets it as one of the best trilogies of all time. Brutal and terrifying, emotional and heartbreaking, visceral and blood-pumping, this spectacle that rose from the ashes of the first two films, made this trilogy not only a work of art but already a legendary myth that will live for decades.

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More The Dark Knight Rises (2012 fi... reviews
review by . July 20, 2012
posted in Movie Hype
The Dark Knight Returns to Fall and Rise Once Again
With the glowing reviews “The Dark Knight Rises” have gotten in this site and others, I am not sure what a minor movie reviewer such as myself can add into the mix? After all, the vast majority is the one singular, collective opinion that really matters right? Not to worry, my friends, I really liked “Batman Begins” and loved “The Dark Knight”. I actually thought that the second film is the epitome of comic book adaptations and may be the measuring stick …
review by . July 20, 2012
posted in Movie Hype
Comic book movies have a strange formula about them as of late.  The first film is usually pretty good by conventional standards and then the second one blows everyone out of the water.  This usually leads to a third part that is usually a letdown after seeing the spectacle of the second.  Yet The Dark Knight Rises does not fall to this trend.  In fact, Christopher Nolan's third part spits in the face of this trend.  The movie is phenomenal in almost everywhere.  …
review by . January 21, 2013
posted in Movie Hype
Nolan made an excellent comic book film in Batman Begins.  The second film had an excellent first half but lost it in the second half with the Harvey Dent/Two Face story.  This third film is closer to the Harvey Dent portion of that second film than the joker portion of that film.  Like that Harvey Dent, the character of Bain was totally ridiculous and more comic book (a la Mad Magazine) than film character.  Ann Hathaway's Selena Kane was no better than Jennifer Garner's …
review by . July 25, 2012
posted in Movie Hype
I looked down the tunnel to see that light of hope, anything, just a speck-and thats all it was.
I knew it was going to happen.  This third Batman movie in a trilogy of movies doesn't measure up to what came before it.  Return of the Jedi, X Men 3, The Enforcer, Terminator 3.  All genre movies where it's earlier works far outweigh the latest.      Christopher Nolan's Batman movies have definetely been a step up over the previous 90's era ones with more of an emphasis on Batman, less on the villians with stronger stories and in the case of Burton's …
review by . July 19, 2012
posted in Movie Hype
  I don't know if I have ever started a review like this but I want you to do yourself a favor and stop reading after this first paragraph, in fact stop reading everything about this movie. There are no spoilers in this review, I'm not going to ruin anything but if you really want to enjoy this movie then you need to get away from it all.   If you are anything like me before you saw this movie you read everything that came out, you rewatched the previous ones, you are probably …
review by . July 26, 2012
posted in Movie Hype
*** out of ****    Eight years after The Joker terrorized Gotham; Lieutenant Jim Gordon (Gary Oldman) has assumed the role of Commissioner and the city has finally been met with peace. Batman was not needed in all those years, and Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) has considered hanging up the suit and cape for good and just locking himself up inside Wayne Manor with only his dear friend and guardian Alfred (Michael Caine) keeping him company. Enter terrorist leader Bane (Tom Hardy); …
review by . July 24, 2012
A fitting end to an amazing Series.
   In 2005 Batman Begins hit theaters; it was released to very positive reviews from critics and movie goers alike. The movie started a new trend for Comic Book movies with its dark and gritty portrayal of the Batman. As great as Batman Begins was, Christopher Nolan topped it with the Dark Knight in 2008. Heath Ledger’s performance as The Joker being the most memorable part of the movie, his dark and chaotic performance as the Joker is one not soon to be forgotten.       …
review by . July 22, 2012
posted in Movie Hype
I don't know I've ever started a review with a more conflicted mind or heavy heart.  This movie will be forever linked to the killings associated with one showing of its midnight opening in a Colorado theater.  No viewer or reviewer can see the film without that fact in mind.  When I saw the movie today a day after the opening and after the news had consumed the internet, I confess that it affected my experience of the movie more than I expected.  The scene in the movie …
review by . July 21, 2012
posted in Movie Hype
Star Rating:         Why does Christopher Nolan labor under the delusion that the Batman character should transcend his comic book image, and that the comic book movie needs to be redefined? Does he not realize that, in taking this approach, he has robbed audiences of that which makes them so entertaining? Twice before, and now with The Dark Knight Rises, he has dragged an innately escapist concept kicking and screaming from the shadowy world of make-believe into the …
review by . July 21, 2012
posted in Movie Hype
Yes, he rises, but how high?
THE DARK KNIGHT RISES Written by Jonathan Nolan and Christopher Nolan Directed by Christopher Nolan Starring Christian Bale, Tom Hardy, Anne Hathaway, Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Michael Caine   Bruce Wayne: You’re afraid that if I go back out there, I’ll fail. Alfred: No, I’m afraid you want to.   It is a rare occurrence in Hollywood for any film franchise to be as consistently incredible throughout its run as Christopher Nolan’s Batman series has been. With …
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Wiki

Warner Bros. Pictures’ and Legendary Pictures’ “The Dark Knight Rises” is the epic conclusion to filmmaker Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy,

Leading an all-star international cast, Oscar® winner Christian Bale (“The Fighter”) again plays the dual role of Bruce Wayne/Batman. The film also stars Anne Hathaway, as Selina Kyle; Tom Hardy, as Bane; Oscar® winner Marion Cotillard (“La Vie en Rose”), as Miranda Tate; and Joseph Gordon-Levitt, as John Blake.

Returning to the main cast, Oscar® winner Michael Caine (“The Cider House Rules”) plays Alfred; Gary Oldman is Commissioner Gordon; and Oscar® winner Morgan Freeman (“Million Dollar Baby”) reprises the role of Lucius Fox.

The screenplay is written by Christopher Nolan and Jonathan Nolan, story by Christopher Nolan & David S. Goyer. The film is produced by Emma Thomas, Christopher Nolan and Charles Roven, who previously teamed on “Batman Begins” and the record-breaking blockbuster “The Dark Knight.” The executive producers are Benjamin Melniker, Michael E. Uslan, Kevin De La Noy and Thomas Tull, with Jordan Goldberg serving as co-producer. The film is based upon characters appearing in comic books published by DC Comics. Batman was created by Bob Kane.
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Details

Director: Christopher Nolan
Genre: Action, Crime, Drama, Thriller
Release Date: July 20, 2012
MPAA Rating: PG-13
Studio: Warner Bros. Pictures, Syncopy Films, Legendary Pictures
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