Vegan Living
Fresh reviews for a full vegan life
Garlic

A species in the onion family

< read all 4 reviews

A Quick Tip by MariaGor

  • Apr 2, 2010
According to vedic culture garlic is not recomended, because nature of it is tamas (the lowest of the three gunas).
Share  
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
Was this helpful?
0
Post a Comment
More Garlic reviews
Quick Tip by . June 13, 2011
posted in Green Living
Health benefits, and one of the more underrated flavors. Everyone knocks it, but just the right amount can go well in certain sauces or with certain spices.
Quick Tip by . April 13, 2010
posted in Vegan Living
Yes, you might get bad breath, but darn, it tastes so good & has health benefits!
Quick Tip by . March 15, 2010
posted in Vegan Living
I hope that garlic is as good for us as tradition has it. It tastes so good.... it smells good too!
About the reviewer

Ranked #25
Member Since: Apr 2, 2010
Last Login: Apr 2, 2010 04:43 AM UTC
Consider the Source

Use Trust Points to see how much you can rely on this review.

You
MariaGor
Your ratings:
rate more to improve this
About this food

Wiki

Allium sativum, commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. Its close relatives include the onion, shallot, leek, and chive. Garlic has been used throughout recorded history for both culinary and medicinal purposes. It has a characteristic pungent, spicy flavor that mellows and sweetens considerably with cooking. A bulb of garlic, the most commonly used part of the plant, is divided into numerous fleshy sections called cloves. Single clove garlic (also called Pearl garlic or Solo garlic) also exists—it originates in the Yunnan province of China. The cloves are used as seed, for consumption (raw or cooked), and for medicinal purposes. The leaves, stems (scape), and flowers (bulbils) on the head (spathe) are also edible and are most often consumed while immature and still tender. The papery, protective layers of "skin" over various parts of the plant and the roots attached to the bulb are the only parts not considered palatable.

The ancestry of cultivated garlic, according to Zohary and Hopf, is not definitely established: "A difficulty in the identification of its wild progenitor is the sterility of the cultivars."

Allium sativum grows in the wild in areas where it has become naturalised; it probably descended from the species Allium longicuspis, which grows wild in southwestern Asia. The "wild garlic", "crow garlic", and "field garlic" of Britain are the species Allium ursinum, Allium vineale,...
view wiki

Details

© 2014 Lunch.com, LLC All Rights Reserved
Lunch.com - Relevant reviews by real people.
Vegan Living is part of the Lunch.com Network - Get this on your site
()
This is you!
Ranked #
Last login
Member since
reviews
comments
ratings
questions
compliments
lists