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Things I Miss Least About Chicago

  • Jul 20, 2013
I lived in Chicago for five years and was hoping to set roots down. It's not the world's best-kept secret that I miss the place, and so I briefly considered a list of things I miss about it. 

When I started giving it some real thought, though, I realized such a list would be completely impossible. There are several reasons why, but I won't regale you with the boring ones. I'll just mention the big two: The first is that such a list would be a bit too personal for my own tastes and include concepts that are way too broad. Some of the stories I have from my life in Chicago go on quite a bit, and trying to condense them all in a list would necessitate the creation of an entire blog. (Which, by the way, I created a couple of years ago!) I would have to explain a lot of background details and in-jokes for a list like that to really fly. 

The second reason is that there are simply way too many things I miss about The Windy City. It brings me a second time to the problem of it making the list too long. 

Oh, what to do, what to do, what to do? Well, as I sat in a luxury hotel room on the set of a movie I was working on recently, Me and a few other staffers and cast members conversed about this nasty heat that's been holding the entire east coast hostage. As we lamented the heat in Buffalo, we began comparing it to the heat we had all felt in other places we had visited. Of course, the Chicago summer was what I had easily the best acquaintance with, so it became my immediate conversational victim. Then the idea hit me: I'll write an anti-Chicago list, featuring everything I hated about the city! And that's how we got to this point!
1
Summer!
The warmest season and I were never on the best of terms in Upstate New York, but while the humidity could be unbearable, the heat was at least usually temperate. People from Buffalo take great delight in telling those from out of the area the city has never had a 100-degree day, and that the city averages only three 90-degree days per year. The big lake next to Buffalo sort of conditions the air. 

Chicago's summers have the very same type of weather, but with a quantification of about ten times. It gets hot, sticky, and uncomfortable. The sun beats up on people on clear days, and when it rains, it's like the sky is taking one of those ongoing, powerful drunken leaks. All storms are severe - my first summer in Chicago, there were three tornadoes that stopped just short of the city in one month. In Mostly Harmless, Douglas Adams wrote this about New York City: "A lot of the inhabitants of New York will honk on mightily about the pleasures of spring, but if they actually knew the first thing about the pleasures of spring they would know of at least 5,983 better places to spend it than New York, and that's just on the same latitude." Ditto Chicago in summer.

Whenever I discuss the weather in Chicago, people always ask me about the cold. I always tell them that if you've spent any real time living in Buffalo, the cold isn't anything they can't handle - it's the summers they have to watch out for.
2
No Civic Pride
Buffalo knows it's never going to be the world class metropolis New York City is, and there's a kind of dignity in knowing that which lets the people here attend to their business without a care about what happens there. Yes, we hate the place politically, but that's mostly because it's so disproportionally represented at every political level. Beyond that, though, the only real thing in New York City that's of concern to upstaters is the fortunes of the New York Yankees, the favored baseball team across the state. 

In terms of civic pride, Chicago is a classic bully. Chicagoans will always be the first to attack any other city to make themselves feel good about living in Chicago, even though Chicago is a world class city in every possible way. Unless, of course, there's a possibility that the city in question might actually be some kind of rival to Chicago in some way - attacks on major cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles, or Atlanta inexplicably aren't seen that often. And if New York City is dragged into the equation, well, a cursory glance at any of the newspapers or civic websites reveals the motherload of inferiority complexes; newspapers are civic websites are always clogged with people moaning about how Chicago will never be like New York City.
3
RedEye
A daily free rag published by the Chicago Tribune, Redeye may be the most insipid newspaper on Earth. I'm saying this, and I grew up reading The Buffalo News. Redeye has lists of bars, restaurants, and events, but those lists are microscopic in terms relative to the size of the city. There's two or maybe three pages of substantial news events, all overshadowed by sports and celebrity coverage which is equal that length, written completely in bullets and blurbs, and consists mainly of photographs and captions. For the first few years I was there, it also featured a sex column written by a womanizer.

Redeye may be the very symbol of Chicago's inferiority complex. All other city-bashing starts in Redeye, and the celebrity buzz tends to treat celebrity sightings like the most amazing thing since Al's Italian Beef, even though several celebrities call Chicago home and can be found roaming the Lake Shore Trail or soaking in Cubs games. 

A friend of mine once delivered a speech at a religious convention in which she used the day's Redeye as a prop. She mentioned the cover, which contained a picture of George Clooney, and got a laugh. Then she said - tongue completely in cheek - that she opened it in the hopes of finding something substantial, and got the biggest laugh of the convention.
See the full review, "RedEye - Your Eyes will Bleed Red".
4
Chicago is Not Broad-Shouldered
The Windy City is called The Windy City because the title was bestowed by a journalist who was covering Chicago's notoriously corrupt politics. He called it The Windy City in regards to the fact that the local politicians were blowing hot air. Well, when the people there tell you how tough they are, they're also spewing hot air. They take the smallest slurs against Chicago to heart. Most of them don't know anything about how to properly weather out a bad winter, either, unless it's by going to Florida for the season. This is not a populace that would ever think to lower itself to picking up snow shovels and digging out of a storm manually, as Buffalo did in 2001 when eight feet of snow fell in four days. They'll buy out the local grocery store and wait for the city plows to bail them out - and that's not a guarantee, since the snow removal department tends to run out of money.
5
Living Costs
My apartment in Chicago was one of those stereotypical walk-in closet-sized spaces. In Buffalo, it wouldn't have been $400 a month. In Chicago, it cost $800 a month, and was considered a steal. I was rarely able to buy meat.

Buffalo is one of the worst cities in the country in taxes, so people in Buffalo have a hard time believing Chicago is even worse. The city has a ten percent sales tax, which was reduced TO ten percent! With the nasty income taxes being what they were, I was basically reduced to life on a $20 budget every week because I was an independent contractor who was making sub-minimum wage before taxes. This is why my life suddenly went south - it was too expensive to live there.
6
Parking
You would think that in a city with such excellent public transportation (and I mean that; yes, I complain about the CTA, but it never fails to get me where I need to go. If you don't like it, try using the NFTA in Buffalo for a month!), more people would be willing to catch the bus and the L. Then again, there are 2.8 million people who live there.

I can't forget the time my sister visited me and had to park two blocks over from my street. Or the time me and a girl I befriended at a local hostel tried to go to Millennium Park for an afternoon, but there were no open spaces in The Loop. I didn't own a car, so this didn't affect me most of the time, but tell any car-owning out-of-town buddies to bring their walking shoes.
7
Chicago Cubs
The Cubs are one of the crown jewels of Major League Baseball, and one of its most popular teams. Yet, the fans always appear convinced that there's some great baseball conspiracy against them which keeps them out of World Series contention. Listen to fans complain about the collapse of 1969 or some rule about where the 1984 NLCS was played which they pulled out of their asses. 

In my article about the Cubs, I made a few particularly harsh blanket remarks about the fans. Now, I didn't mean them using complete blanket terminology; there are good people and devoted, knowledgeable fans in the Cubs' base. Unfortunately, there tends to be a frat party mentality surrounding Wrigleyville, and during games with big opponents or at certain times, drunkenness takes over and invites a lot of boorish behavior which isn't confined just to the stadium. Being in Wrigleyville during a Cubs game can be a trial of patience because the stadium, unlike every other baseball stadium, is right in the middle of the neighborhood. The team seems to encourage this - the Harry Caray statue in front of Wrigley Field comes off as an endorsement, and the celebrity rotation singing "Take Me Out to the Ballgame" doesn't help.

Also, the owner of Wrigley Field doesn't mind endangering the fans. The field is clearly falling apart, but it's privately owned, and so the owner keeps refusing to repair the place. The fact that he's using the White Sox' public funds as leverage is the single greatest argument American sports has against public money being involved in professional sports.
See the full review, "Grizzly Bears They're Not".
8
Cycling in the Wind
Yes, The Windy City gets its share of the blowy stuff. If you're into cycling, trying to ride a bicycle in the wind is like drinking a potion that allows you to walk through walls, then trying to walk through a cliff.
9
The Bid for the 2016 Olympics
So Mayor Richard Daley decided he wanted to wipe out a large public space in a poor neighborhood to build a big stadium and athlete housing which would have been used for two weeks. He wanted to add a fifth star to the Chicago city flag representing an Olympics he hadn't even won yet. 

This bid in and of itself, by the way, cost $50 million in taxpayer dollars. You want to know where all the tax money is going? Here's your answer. 

Frankly, one would have to be a complete fucking moron to even want and apply for the Olympics after knowing the kinds of wreckage they've been responsible for leaving in their host cities. Chicago would, in preparation, have gone through terrible traffic delays, small business shutdowns by the special, gestapo-like Olympics Police, construction, and poor people being herded out of the areas they lived in so the athletes could take over for two weeks. All on the public's dime, of course, and in a city which wasn't able to pay for it. 

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About the list creator
Nicholas Croston ()
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Hi! I'm here in part to plug my writing and let everyone know that I'm trying to take my work commercial.      Now, what about me? Well, obviously I like to write. I'm … more
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